Saint Louis University

Course Information

Explore the 1818 Advanced College Credit Program college course offerings at the high schools.


Course Descriptions

We invite you to explore the college offerings by clicking on the disciplines below to see the full extent of  college courses available to high school students.

Quicklinks to Discipline:

 


 

Important Updates:

  1. The University has adopted a new 4-digit course numbering system that begins in Fall 2015. Course listings below notate both the current 4-digit number and prior 3-digit number for courses.
  2. New Offerings for 15-16: Chinese (CHIN 1010, 1020, and 2010); Music (MUSC 1400:Lower Division Class Music); ARTH 1010: History of Western Art; Education (EDF 2010, EDF 2020; EDF 2030; EDF 2040); THEO 2790: Studies in Non-Christian Religious Traditions.
  3. Modern and Classical Languages is now Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.
  4. The English Department has approved a new curriculum that will affect 1818 ACC English course offerings.Implementation Plan for English Curriculum is as follows for 1818 ACC: Fall 2014 - "Early Adopters" - New 200 level courses which are ready to roll out with the on-campus sections; Spring 2015 - Optional implementation for those courses ready to make the change; Fall 2015 - Full implementation for all 200 level 1818 ACC English courses. See old and new courses.

Anthropology and Sociology

SOC 1100 (formerly SOC 110) - Introduction to Sociology (3)
This introductory course emphasizes fundamental concepts in sociology and their application to contemporary society for the purpose of enhancing the students understanding of the world in which they live.

SOC 1200 (formerly SOC 120) - Introduction to Anthropology (3)
This course provides an introduction to the primary theories, concepts, and methodologies relating to anthropology.  The main subfields of cultural anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistics, and applied anthropology are surveyed and their integration is highlighted for a more in-depth understanding of the complexities in modern human societies and behavior.

SOC 2600 (foremrly SOC 260) - Intro to Forensic Sciences (3)
Forensic science is the application of science to the law and involves various scientific disciplines. This course introduces the various methodologies and applications used in forensics. The objectives of the course are to introduce various disciplines and methodologies of forensic sciences, understand the roles of various disciplines in crime investigation, and demonstrate the use of forensic science in actual cases.

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Biology

BIOL 1040 (formerly BIOL 104) - Principles of Biology I (4)*
First semester of the two-semester Principles of Biology sequence (followed by BIOL 106). Course content includes principles of: nature of science, defining properties of living systems, biological macromolecules, structure and function of cells, cellular metabolism, heredity, and animal structure, function and development. Lecture & Laboratory course.

BIOL 1060 (formerly BIOL 106) - Principles of Biology II (4) *
Second semester of the two-semester Principles of Biology freshman sequence (preceded by BIOL-1060). Course content includes evolution, phylogenetics, diversity of life, ecology and plant biology.

* Students planning to enter the Pre-professional Health Program are advised to enroll in this course as a matriculated (on-campus) student.

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Chemistry

CHEM 1110 & CHEM 1115 (formerly CHEM 163 & 165) -  General Chemistry I Lecture (3) & General Chemistry I Lab (1) *
Introduction to the theoretical and mathematical models of chemistry, including periodic table and the elements, naming compounds, basic atomic structure, principles of chemical bonding, gas laws, chemical reactions. Lecture three hours, laboratory (CHEM 1115) one hour.

CHEM 1120 & CHEM 1125 (formerly CHEM 164 & 166) - Introduction to Chemistry II (3) & General Chemistry Lab II (1) *
Prerequisite: CHEM 1110. Continuation of Chemistry 1110 covering redox reactions and electrochemistry, chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, transition metal chemistry, and descriptive chemistry of the elements. Lecture three hours, laboratory (CHEM 1125) one hour.

* Students planning to enter the Pre-professional Health Program are advised to enroll in this course as a matriculated (on-campus) student.

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Communication

COMM 1200 (formerly COMM 120) -  Public Speaking (3)

Students are introduced to principles of effective public speaking and provided with opportunities to develop public speaking skills. In addition, standards of evaluation for public communication are established for the use in evaluating their own and other's public speaking performances.

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Education

NEW STARTING 2015-2016

EDF 2010 (formerly EDF 201) - Foundations of Early Childhood Education (3)
A systematic analysis of how social issues impact schools forcing continual change and reform. Each part of educational system will be analyzed including organization philosophy, environment, management, and assessment. Field experiences are required and structured to focus on early childhood education (pre-K - K).

EDF 2020 (formerly EDF 202) - Foundations of Elementary Education (3)
A systematic analysis of how social issues impact schools forcing continual change and reform. Each part of educational system will be analyzed including organization philosophy, environment, management, and assessment. Field experiences are required and structured to focus on early childhood education (1 - 6).

EDF 2030 (formerly EDF 203) - Foundations of Middle School Education (3)
A systematic analysis of how social issues impact schools forcing continual change and reform. Each part of educational system will be analyzed including organization philosophy, environment, management, and assessment. Field experiences are required and structured to focus on early childhood education (5 - 9).

EFDF 2040 (formerly EDF 204) - Foundations of Secondary Education (3)
A systematic analysis of how social issues impact schools forcing continual change and reform. Each part of educational system will be analyzed including organization philosophy, environment, management, and assessment. Field experiences are required and structured to focus on early childhood education (9 - 12).

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English

ENGL 1500 (formerly ENGL 150) - The Process of Composition (3)
Develops effective personal and expository prose writing skills, including methods of invention, organization, audience analysis, and style. Focuses on the compositional process.

ENGL 1900 (formerly ENGL 190) - Advanced Strategies of Rhetoric and Research (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 1500 or its equivalent. Studies complex structures of language, including its logical and persuasive possibilities. Emphasizes analytical reading, critical thinking, and research methodology skills.

ENGL 2250 (replaces former ENGL 200-level courses) - Conflict, Social Justice and Literature (3)
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Cultural Conflict and Social Justice. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.

ENGL 2350 (replaces former ENGL 200-level courses) - Faith, Doubt and Literature (3)
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Faith and Doubt. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - this course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.

ENGL 2450 (replaces former ENGL 200-level courses) - Nature, Ecology and Literature  (3)
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Nature and Ecology. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.

ENGL 2550 (replaces former ENGL 200-level courses) - Gender, Identity and Literature  (3)
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Gender and Identity. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.

ENGL 2650 (replaces former ENGL 200-level courses) - Technology, Media and Literature (3)
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Technology and Media. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.

ENGL 2750 (replaces former ENGL 200-level courses) - Film, Culture and Literature (3)
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Film and Culture. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.

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Fine & Performing Arts

 

ART HISTORY

ARTH 1000 (formerly ARTH 100) - Approaching the Arts: Art (3)
Presents an introduction to the world of the visual arts with the goal of developing an understanding of important themes, functions, media, principles of design, and visual characteristics found in art.

ARTH 1010 (formerly ARTH 101) - History of Western Art (3) - NEW STARTING 2015-2016
Presents a chronological survey of the major periods of art history (ancient, medieval, early modern, and modern) and introduces students to key concepts, terminology, analytical strategies, and critical questions relevant to understanding art.

 

MUSIC

MUSC 1000 (formerly MUSC 100) - Approaching the Arts: Music (3)
Introduction to the appreciation and understanding of the basic elements, genres, and style periods of Western music. Classical and popular styles will be presented; some live concert attendance will be required.

MUSC 1400 (formerly MUSC 140) - Lower Division Music Class (2) - NEW STARTING 2015-2016
Small group instruction in class voice or instrumental family.

 

THEATRE

THR 1000 (formerly THR 100) - Approaching the Arts: Theatre (3)
Objectives: 1. To examine some public impressions of the role of the arts in American society; 2. To demonstrate to students, through lecture and discussion, some of the key features of a play in performance which critics, fans, and theatre artists have sought in contemporary productions; 3. To introduce some of the students to the standard tasks and procedures brought to bear in play productions; 4.To apply all of these studies to the appreciation of plays by viewing several live productions during the semester.

 

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History

HIST 1110 (formerly HIST 111) - Origins of the Modern World to 1500 (3)
An historical approach to understanding the development of the modern world to 1500. The course will examine ancient civilizations, the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, Christianity, Islam, Byzantium, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and encounters between cultures and regions of the globe.

HIST 1120 (formerly HIST 112) - Origins of the Modern World, 1500 to the Present (3)
An historical approach to understanding the development of the modern world from 1500 to the present. The course will examine the cross-cultural impact of European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the Scientific Revolution, absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French and Industrial Revolutions, nineteenth and twentieth century thought, the World Wars, totalitarian and liberation movements, and the challenges of the new global age.

HIST 2600 (formerly HIST 260) - History of the U.S. to 1865 (3)
This survey course examines the development of the United States from its pre-Columbian origins through the Civil War.

HIST 2610 (formerly HIST 261) - History of the U.S. since 1865 (3)
This survey course examines the U.S. from Reconstruction through the present.

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International Studies

ISTD 1100 (formerly ISTD 110) - Introduction to International Studies (1)
This is an introduction to the literature and themes of International Studies. It emphasizes intercultural awareness, cultural interaction, and problem solving in an international context.

ISTD 2900 (foremerly ISTD 290 - Intercultural Seminar and Practicum (3)
This course develops and studies "intercultural awareness, cultural interaction, and problem solving in an international context." International Studies is the interdisciplinary analysis of global processes that shape international trends and lives of human beings throughout the world. This course gives students a chance to further develop awareness of the methods and topics of International Studies through a broad, humanistic socio-political approach that will serve as a foundation for further international studies in numerous fields offered at Saint Louis University. Seminar-style instruction and discussion will be paired with a practicum element taking advantage of the course's unique format and structure. 

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Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

CHINESE - NEW STARTING FALL 2015!

CHIN 1010 (formerly CHIN 110) - Communicating in Chinese I (3)
Introduction to basic pronunciation (pinyin), simple sentence structure. Simple oral comprehension and speaking Chinese. Vocabulary items and useful phrases for surviving simple daily life and travel in China.

CHIN 1020 (formerly CHIN 115) - Communicating in Chinese II (3)
Development of Chinese vocabulary, oral comprehension, fundamentals of Chinese grammar, reading, writing and speaking capabilities. Introduction to Chinese culture.

CHIN 2010 (formerly CHIN 210) - Intermediate Chinese: Language and Culture (3)
Development and refinement of Chinese vocabulary, oral comprehension, fundamentals of Chinese grammar, reading, writing and speaking capabilities. Introduction to Chinese culture and business protocols.

 

FRENCH

FREN 1010 (formerly FREN 110) - Communicating in French I (3)
Introduction to French language and culture: reading, writing, speaking, listening. The course emphasizes the acquisition of communicative skills.

FREN 1020 (formerly FREN 115) - Communicating in French II (3)
Prerequisite: Two years of high school French or placement. Continuation of FREN 1010. Expansion of oral and written communication skills in areas of immediate needs, personal interests and daily life.

FREN 2010 (formerly FREN 210) - Intermediate French: Language and Culture (3)
Prerequisite: FREN 1020. Continued practice in and development of all language skills, enabling the student to function in an increased number of areas. Materials and discussion relating to French culture.

 

GERMAN

GR 1010 (formerly GR 110)- Communicating in German I (3)
Introduction to German language and culture: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Emphasis on the acquisition of communicative skills.

GR 1020 (formerly GR 115) - Communicating in German II (3)
Prerequisite: Two years of high school German or placement. Continuation of GR 1010. Expansion of all language skills, enabling the student to function in simple situations related to immediate needs, personal interests and daily life.

GR 2010 (formerly GR 210) - Intermediate German: Language and Culture (3)
Prerequisite: GR 1020. Continued practice in and development of all language skills, enabling the student to function in an increased number of areas. Materials and discussion relating to German culture.

 

GREEK

GK 1010 (formerly GK 110) - Reading Greek I (3)
Pronunciation, vocabulary, morphology, syntax, and practice in reading.

GK 1020 (formerly GK 115) - Reading Greek II (3)
Vocabulary, morphology, syntax, and practice in reading. Easier Greek authors introduced.

GK 2010 (formerly GK 210) - Intermediate Greek Lang & Lit (3)
Vocabulary; intermediate grammar; more extensive reading in easier authors; selections from more difficult ancient authors.

 

LATIN

LATN 1010 (formerly LATN 110) - Reading in Latin I (3)
Pronunciation, vocabulary, morphology, syntax, and practice in reading. Material includes the first through the fourth declensions; the indicative forms of sum and of the regular verbs; some demonstrative, interrogative, personal, reflexive, possessive, relative, and intensive pronouns.

LATN 1020 (formerly LATN 115) - Reading in Latin II (3)
Prerequisite: Two years of high school Latin or placement. Review of first semester material. Vocabulary, morphology, syntax, and practice in reading. New material includes the regular verb, some irregular verbs, the fifth declension, the comparison of adjectives, the formation and comparison of adverbs, numerals, constructions of time and place, subordinate clauses, and uses of the subjunctive.

LATN 1020 (formerly LATN 210) - Intermediate Latin: Language and Literature (3)
Prerequisite: LATN 1020. Review of material learned during the first two semesters and coverage of remaining grammar; further vocabulary-extensions; extensive practice in reading continuous Latin prose.

 

RUSSIAN

RUSS 1010 (formerly RUSS 110) - Communicating in Russian I (3)
Introduction to Russian: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis on the acquisition of communicative skills in simple situations related to personal interests and daily and academic life. Fall Semester.

RUSS 1020 (formerly RUSS 115) - Communicating in Russian II (3)
Prerequisite: Two years of high school Russian or placement. Continuation of RUSS 1010. Offered Spring semester.

RUSS 2010 (formerly RUSS 210) - Intermediate Russian: Language and Culture (3)
Prerequisite: RUSS 1020. Continued practice in speaking, emphasis on functional skills. Gerunds and participles. Readings in and discussion of culture. Offered Fall semester.

 

SPANISH

SPAN 1010 (formerly SPAN 110) - Communicating in Spanish I (3) *
Introduction to Spanish language and culture. Prepares student to operate within areas of immediate needs and simple situations.

SPAN 1020 (formerly SPAN 115) - Communicating in Spanish II (3) *
Prerequisite: Two years of high school Spanish or placement. Continuation of SPAN 1010. Prepares the student to function in simple situations related to personal interests and daily life.

SPAN 2010 (formerly SPAN 210) - Intermediate Spanish: Language and Culture (3) *
Prerequisite: SPAN 1020. Continued practice in all skills. Readings in and discussion of Hispanic Culture.

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Mathematics & Computer Science

CSCI 1300 (formerly CSCI 150) - Intro Obj Orient Program (4)
An introduction to computer programming based upon early coverage of object-oriented principles, such as classes, methods, inheritance and polymorphism, together with treatment of traditional flow of control structures. Good software development practices will also be established, including issues of design, documentation, and testing.

MATH 1300 (formerly MATH 130) - Elementary Statistics with Computers (3)
Prerequisite: College Algebra (Math 1200 or its equivalent). Data production and analysis; probability basics, distributions; sampling, estimation with confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test; correlation and regression; cross tabulations and chi-square. Students learn to use a statistical package such as SPSS. Option to offer this course in one semester or two semesters in the same academic year. If the course is offered across two semesters, students will enroll in the spring.

MATH 1510 (formerly 142) - Calculus I (4)
Prerequisite: A grade of "C-" or better in MATH 1400 or equivalent (numbers, sets, polynomials, rational functions, systems of equations, and inequalities). Elementary functions; differentiation and integration from geometric and symbolic viewpoints; limits, continuity; applications. Offered Fall and Spring semesters. Option to offer this course in one semester or two semesters in the same academic year. If the course is offered across two semesters, students will enroll in the spring.

MATH 1520 (formerly 143) - Calculus II (4)
Pre-requisite: A grade of "C-" or better in MATH 1510. Symbolic and numerical techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, infinite series, power series, Taylor series, differential equations; polar coordinates, applications. Option to offer this course across two semesters in the same academic year. If this course is offered across the year, students will enroll in the spring.

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Philosophy

PHIL 1050 (formerly PHIL 105) - Introduction to Philosophy: Self and Reality (3)
This course will focus primarily on the writings of Plato and Aristotle as central figures in that historical period when Western humanity began to use and to develop reason systematically as an instrument for understanding the world and its place in that world. Students will be introduced to the Greek contributions to logic, metaphysics, and ethics.

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Physics

PHYS 1220 (formerly PHYS 122) - Physics I (4)*
Prerequisite: High school algebra. Lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory in mechanics and heat.

PHYS 1240 (formerly PHYS 124) - Physics II (4)*
Prerequisite: PHYS 122. Lectures, demonstrations and laboratory in electricity, magnetism, wave motion, sound, optics and modern physics.

* Physics for non-majors. Students planning to enter the Pre-professional Health Program are advised to enroll in this course as a matriculated (on-campus) student.

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Political Science

POLS 1100 (formerly POLS 110) - American Politics (3)
Basic principles of American systems of government; relations of citizens to government; structure, organization, powers and procedures of governmental agencies.

POL 1500 (formerly POLS 150) - Introduction to Comparative Politics (3)
This course introduces students to the logic, method, and theoretical approaches of comparative politics. It examines the institutions of government in various kinds of political systems around the world, particularly liberal democratic systems in advanced industrial countries, post-communist regimes, and new democracies in developing countries. It also investigates the process of political change, particularly modernization, democratization, globalization, state-building, and pressures on welfare state.

POLS 1600 (formerly POLS 160) - Introduction to International Politics (3)
Role of power, ethics, law, public opinion, effectiveness of various techniques of international relations; diplomacy, propaganda, subversion. Crucial problems. Proliferation of nuclear weapons, revolutionary warfare, hunger. How should we respond to the challenge?

POLS 2520 (formerly POLS 252) - Introduction to African Politics (3)
Study of governments and political processes in Africa. Examines salient themes, such as the nature of African traditional heritage; the colonial experience; nationalism and independence; the challenge of nation-building; African political parties; the role of the military and contributions of different theories to the understanding of African politics.

POLS 2820 (formerly POLS 282) - American Foreign Policy (3)
Assessment of extent of formal and informal influence within the decision-making process exerted by governmental and non-governmental agencies on current U.S. foreign policy.

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Psychology

PSY 1010 (formerly PSY 101) - General Psychology (3)
Provides a basic and general knowledge of the theoretical, scientific, and conceptual foundations of psychology, including biological, cognitive, emotional, developmental, cultural and social aspects. Includes key concepts and principles, methods for collecting and evaluating evidence, and application of psychological knowledge.

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Theology

THEO 1000 (formerly THEO 100) - Theological Foundations (3)
This course begins the disciplined reflection on religion in the university. Along with providing the basic vocabulary, method of theology, and key theological concepts, it equips the student with the historical, textual, and comparative methods and skills that are foundational for further study on the university level.

THEO 2790 (formerly THEO 279) - Studies in Non-Christian Religious Traditions (3)
Courses on the 200 level are more advanced and more specific studies of comparative theology, biblical studies, historical and systematic theology which have all received a fundamental treatment in the 100 level course. Thus, there are courses in oriental religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. There are focused courses on the Hebrew Scriptures and the Christian New Testament. There are historical courses on early, medieval, and American Christianity. And there are systematic courses on specific themes in systematic theology like God, Jesus, Church, Sacraments and the like.

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Women's and Gender Studies

WGST 1900 (formerly WGST 197) - Introduction to Women's Studies (3)
Examines issues concerning women in a variety of disciplines, including the humanities, the social sciences, the sciences, and art.  Special focus given to enabling students to recognize and critically analyze the notion of gender and patterns of gender roles.

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