Saint Louis University

The Center for Vaccine Development seeks volunteers for a study of experimental flu vaccines.

Potential volunteers must be between 18 and 64 years of age and not have received a flu vaccine in the past six months. This study involves two visits to the Vaccine Center approximately one month apart, and two phone calls, approximately eight days and six months after the first visit.
Participants will be asked to take a temperature daily for seven days after vaccination and record any symptoms observed between the two visits. Volunteers will be compensated for time and travel.

Influenza (commonly referred to as "the flu") is a common respiratory infection caused by several related viruses. It can be easily passed from person to person through coughing and sneezing or through contact with fluids from an infected person's mouth or nose.

Vaccination is the most effective medical action to prevent the flu. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends everyone six months and older receive an annual flu vaccine. Vaccination is especially recommended for people who have poor health (for example, heart or lung disease), because they are at higher risk of catching the flu. Vaccination is also recommended for people who risk infecting others within their home or work environment, such as parents of young children and health-care professionals.

The purpose of this trial is to see if the investigational vaccine (Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine-Intradermal), which contains four flu strains, works the same as the control vaccine (Fluzone Intradermal), an approved vaccine that contains three flu strains. More specifically, this trial will test whether the investigational vaccine is safe and if it will cause the immune system to create antibodies (proteins that help prevent infection) against the flu.

To learn more about this study, contact the Center for Vaccine Development at 314-977-6333 or 1-866-410-6333 (toll free); email vaccine@slu.edu; or visit http://vaccine.slu.edu. Ask about study number 293.