Taking Another Look at the Project-Based Class

by Gina Merys, Associate Director, Reinert Center In a recent article, “The Road to a Project-Based Classroom,” Gintaras Duda explains how he has moved from lecture to projects in his quantum mechanics course. The course he describes is one that has gone through three iterations as it has evolved into the wholly project-based class that […]

Learner-Centered Pedagogy: The Fear of Losing Control

by Kenneth L. Parker, Steber Professor in Theological Studies In the spring of 1991, I returned to teaching after more than five years as a Benedictine monk. The monastery had been founded in China in the 1920s, and when exiled after the Chinese Revolution, the community had relocated to the Mojave Desert in California. During my […]

Teaching Today’s Students: The Conversations Continue

by Debie Lohe, Director, Reinert Center This spring, we’re continuing to focus on our theme for the year, Teaching Today’s Students.  The theme provides an opportunity to highlight the most important element of context – our students – and to explore the many aspects of who “today’s students” are and what is needed to “teach” […]

Teaching Students to Think like Experts

by Kelly McEnerny, Graduate Assistant, Reinert Center  An expert guitarist might hear Tom Petty’s “Free Falling” and be able to discern patterns related to a chromatic scale and relate those patterns to other songs – I recently learned from a colleague and professional musician that The Kingsmen’s “Louie Louie” shares the same pattern as “Free […]

Moving from “Why Aren’t They Reading?” to Creating a Culture of Reading

by Elisabeth Hedrick-Moser, Graduate Assistant, Reinert Center Skeptical that your students did the reading?  Chances are you’re probably right to be.  Studies show that on any given day, about 1/3 of the students will have read the assignment (Hobson 2).  Eric Hobson’s IDEA paper*, “Getting Students to Read:  Fourteen Tips,” offers a diagnosis of student […]

Ferguson at the Clock Tower: When community-based inquiry comes to campus

by Lauren Arend, Assistant Professor, Education On the morning of Monday, October 13, the day the SLU campus woke to protestors and activists setting up camp at the clock tower, I was busy preparing for my School and Community class for preservice teachers.  As has happened often over the two semesters I have taught this course, […]

“Metanoia” in PhD Mentoring

by Kenneth L. Parker, Steber Professor in Theological Studies, Department of Theological Studies Metanoia is a transliteration of the Greek word, μετάνοια, and means “change of mind, repentance, regret.” While the Greek word means far more than the English terms “repentance” or “regret” can convey, the expression “change of mind” is too vague to carry the force of […]

Student Engagement Technique: Liven Up Class Discussions with the IF-AT Form

By Elizabeth Sweeny Block, Assistant Professor, Department of Theological Studies Have you ever posed a question to your students only to be met with blank stares and silence?  Have you wondered how you could better facilitate discussion in class?  Have you wished that you could motivate your students to participate in class conversations?  The IF-AT […]

Students’ Perspectives on the Meaning of Course Relevance

by Kelly McEnerny, Graduate Assistant, Reinert Center Imagine attending a course that seemed not to relate to your goals and showed little compatibility with your interests. For anyone who can remember furtively glancing at the clock in the back of the classroom, this exercise should be easy. Your experience would likely have involved some lack […]

Power Over or Power To?

Has the balance of power changed in classrooms full of millennial students? Jennifer Waldeck, in a short article in The Teaching Professor*, “Reflections on Teacher Power in the Contemporary Classroom,” argues that current student behaviors challenge “traditional assumptions” about the power teachers have to influence students.  She lists conventional ways of influencing students: Using “rewards” […]