Engaging Students to Improve Academic Integrity

by Kim Levenhagen, Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Therapy & Athletic Training On March 24, 2015, Provost John Etchemendy wrote a letter to all faculty at Stanford University regarding an increasing number of allegations regarding academic dishonesty.  He wrote, “Dishonesty is corrosive in an academic community.”  In his letter he implored faculty to define academic […]

Broadening our Definition of Expert

by Lauren Arend, Assistant Professor, Education I’m always looking for ways to connect my students at SLU to the broader St. Louis community.  One of the ways that I have done this is to bring local school and non-profit leaders into the classroom as guest speakers.  These guests are framed as experts who can insert a […]

Real Life, Online Service Learning: One Teacher’s Path

by Kasi Williamson, Assistant Professor & Assistant Chair, Organizational Studies Context: What, Where, and Who I Teach In the School for Professional Studies (SPS) at SLU, I teach communication courses to adult learners, in eight-week terms, in online and on-ground formats. In other words: I get to teach transformative concepts to extraordinary students in a format […]

Data Literacy Tools for the Classroom

by Rebecca Hyde, Research & Instruction Librarian, Associate Professor, Pius XII Memorial Library “Data literacy” is used to mean many different things, but I recently came across a simple definition that really resonated with me: Data literacy is “the ability to interpret, evaluate, and communicate statistical information” (Beauchamp 2015). I like this broad definition because it encompasses […]

The Purpose of College: Career-making or Soul-making?

by Elisabeth Hedrick-Moser, Graduate Assistant, Reinert Center Dan Berrett’s recent Chronicle article traces “the day the purpose of college changed” to the day that Ronald Reagan suggested that, in a time of economic downturn, “there are certain intellectual luxuries that perhaps we could do without.”  From this day in 1967, Barrett traces a change in […]

Taking Another Look at the Project-Based Class

by Gina Merys, Associate Director, Reinert Center In a recent article, “The Road to a Project-Based Classroom,” Gintaras Duda explains how he has moved from lecture to projects in his quantum mechanics course. The course he describes is one that has gone through three iterations as it has evolved into the wholly project-based class that […]

Learner-Centered Pedagogy: The Fear of Losing Control

by Kenneth L. Parker, Steber Professor in Theological Studies In the spring of 1991, I returned to teaching after more than five years as a Benedictine monk. The monastery had been founded in China in the 1920s, and when exiled after the Chinese Revolution, the community had relocated to the Mojave Desert in California. During my […]

Teaching Today’s Students: The Conversations Continue

by Debie Lohe, Director, Reinert Center This spring, we’re continuing to focus on our theme for the year, Teaching Today’s Students.  The theme provides an opportunity to highlight the most important element of context – our students – and to explore the many aspects of who “today’s students” are and what is needed to “teach” […]

Teaching Students to Think like Experts

by Kelly McEnerny, Graduate Assistant, Reinert Center  An expert guitarist might hear Tom Petty’s “Free Falling” and be able to discern patterns related to a chromatic scale and relate those patterns to other songs – I recently learned from a colleague and professional musician that The Kingsmen’s “Louie Louie” shares the same pattern as “Free […]

Moving from “Why Aren’t They Reading?” to Creating a Culture of Reading

by Elisabeth Hedrick-Moser, Graduate Assistant, Reinert Center Skeptical that your students did the reading?  Chances are you’re probably right to be.  Studies show that on any given day, about 1/3 of the students will have read the assignment (Hobson 2).  Eric Hobson’s IDEA paper*, “Getting Students to Read:  Fourteen Tips,” offers a diagnosis of student […]