Using the Pomodoro Technique to Help You and Your Students Be More Productive

by Chris Grabau, Instructional Developer, Reinert Center The Pomodoro Technique can be a useful approach to help dedicate time and energy to a specific task.  Developed by Francesco Cirillo in the 1980’s, the technique has become a popular method to set goals, boost productivity, and improve concentration. Named after Cirillo’s tomato shaped timer, the technique […]

Tips for Sustaining Collaborative Learning

by Dipti Subramaniam, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Reinert Center Implementing collaborative learning in the classroom is an exciting process. However, one can quickly learn that incorporating new efforts can be a daunting task for many instructors, especially for first timers. Here are four useful tips for sustaining collaborative learning in the classroom: 1. Plan Think about when […]

Reimagining What You Already Use

by Jerod Quinn, Instructional Developer, Reinert Center The summer can offer a little extra time to look around at what’s going on in the greater teaching and learning community. And because of my personality, I am drawn to new technology like a mosquito to a bug zapper. That may be why I have been thinking […]

“You say Tomato, I say Tomato…”

by Sandy Gambill, Senior Instructional Developer, Reinert Center Are you spending some time reflecting on your spring semester and wondering why the group projects you spent so much time designing fell short of your goal? We may think we’re designing collaborative projects where students are working together towards a common goal, however, students often view […]

One More Thing Before Summer

by Jerod Quinn, Instructional Developer, Reinert Center I’m going to hold off declaring that summer is officially here for just one more moment. I know the residence halls are empty, the grades are all turned in, dissertations have been defended, and that course evaluations are arriving in our mailboxes. But before officially diving headfirst into […]

What’s On Our Minds Lately: The Instructional Design Team

by Jerod Quinn, CTTL Instructional Designer. In my line of work as an instructional designer, I get to be exposed to new ideas and tools all the time. Some of those ideas manage to grab my attention and take hold of it. Here are three that I have come across in the last few months […]

Pedagogy and the Teaching of Law

Saint Louis University Law professor, Miriam Cherry, has recently conducted classroom research exploring new ways to teach about employment discrimination. The results of that research are published in the Fall 2013 issue of the Saint Louis University Law Journal. Professor Cherry’s article “explores virtual worlds as a teaching technique in the Employment Discrimination class. In […]

Teaching a Flipped Class for the Second Time

by Michael Lewis, Associate Vice President for Faculty Development,  Associate Professor of Chemistry Last year I taught the course Principles of Chemistry II using a flipped classroom approach.  This was my first time teaching the course in this manner, after having taught the course once using a traditional format.  The class was relatively large with about […]

Close Only Counts in History and Horseshoes

by Flannery Burke, Ph.D., Associate Professor in History and Fulbright Roving Scholar to Norway Here are three historical mistakes I may have conveyed in the course of teaching American culture to high school English classes in Norway as a part of that nation’s Fulbright Roving Scholars program.  Which is most egregious? 1)     Abraham Lincoln served as President […]

Motivating Student Writers to Revise

by Debie Lohe, Director, Reinert Center Recently, I was invited to facilitate a workshop with faculty on working with student writers.  It’s a topic very close to my heart; for almost 15 years, I taught composition classes to undergraduates at all levels, and I served for a time as director of a composition program.  It’s […]