Wednesday, 13 March 2013

Wednesday of the Fourth Week of Lent

IS 49:8-15

PS 145:8-9, 13CD-14, 17-18

JN 5:17-30

The readings for the day can be found here.

 

Today’s readings fill me with hope despite my human tendency to dwell in the darkness – the desert of doubt.  Too often, we visualize God through the lens of our human shortcomings – our tendency to be so busy that we do not consider the pain in others; our inability to walk in deep and abiding love with our students and colleagues, and our doubt in the faithfulness of family and friends.  We have difficulty accepting God’s faithfulness to us and question his attention to all aspects of our lives because our sight is clouded by our imperfections in these areas. We consider the challenges and tragedies of life with far more frequency than we do the joy of God’s presence and the hope of salvation through God’s infinite mercy.  We find it difficult to love each other unconditionally and we are often unwilling to believe that God loves us without exception.

The hope of today’s readings is that God is faithfully present in our lives.  Each Lent we are reminded that God gave his beloved Son over to death so that we could live in the fullness of God’s love.  Today’s readings remind us of God’s infinite mercy, tenderness and limitless caring for our spiritual, physical and emotional needs.  We look to Easter and the knowledge of the joy of resurrection.  In the meantime God gives us countless examples of his love for us: a gloriously colorful sunrise the day after a dear friend’s death; a daffodil in bloom in the midst of snow; the touch of a friend seeking to ease our pain; the kiss of a puppy, and the laughter of a young child.  These are the springs of water to which God guides us and through which God is near to us.  God is always faithful and loving; we need only to quiet our lives enough to recognize that truth.

Darina Sargeant is Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training.

 

 

 

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