Saint Louis University

Lecture Capture Policies & Guidelines

Introductory Statement

To better engage our students and to better meet a variety of learning needs, Saint Louis University is pleased to offer Tegrity, lecture capture software that records audio, presentation slides, and other class content. Lecture capture (LC) can be a powerful tool in the learning process; it offers an exciting opportunity to deliver course content in new ways and/or to make content available for students after class. While it can be of tremendous value, however, it also comes with the responsibility to make good decisions about what to capture and how to make it available to others.

The following guidelines answer common questions, offer tips and strategies for best practices, and provide links to University policies and considerations about privacy and property issues that can arise with lecture capture.

Topics Covered:
General FAQs about Lecture Capture at SLU
Student Considerations

 


Resources
References / For Further Research

General FAQs about Lecture Capture at SLU

1. What is lecture capture?
2. What tool is used for lecture capture at SLU?
3. How can lecture capture benefit students?
4. How do students use lecture capture?
5. How can lecture capture benefit faculty?
6. How do faculty use lecture capture?
7. What conditions make LC most useful?
8. What student privacy considerations are there with lecture capture?
9. What copyright considerations are there with lecture capture?
10. Can students duplicate or redistribute recorded lectures?
11. Where are recorded files stored?
12. Are the files stored at Tegrity secure?  

1. What is lecture capture?

  • Lecture capture is just what it sounds like--a way to capture or record (full or partial) lectures. With most lecture capture tools, lectures can be pre-recorded and distributed to students ahead of time, or they can be captured during a live class session and made available for review afterward.
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2. What tool is used for lecture capture at SLU?
3. How can lecture capture benefit students?
  • Lecture capture (LC) has been shown to have multiple benefits for student learning. Having a recorded lecture offers students the ability to review the material at their own pace for better understanding. (This can be particularly helpful for international and other multilingual students and students with disabilities.) This self-paced attribute also provides flexibility in their note-taking. The recordings provide additional resources that complement (not replace) the classroom experience by giving opportunities to review demonstrations, previous lectures, and guest speakers. The most obvious benefit is that students who miss the lecture in class have the opportunity to catch up on the material. A less mainstream, but growing, option for LC is that instructors have the ability to record lectures outside of the classroom, and assign them as homework. Then, class time is used for more hands-on work, more student-instructor interaction, more student peer mentoring, and other more interactive problem solving processes (Zhu, Bergom, 2010). An initial survey of SLU faculty suggests that students' exam scores have improved in classes where Tegrity has been used for review of course content.
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4. How do students use lecture capture?
  • LC works best as a supplement to traditional instruction, not a replacement for it. Students generally use the LC recordings to review material, complete homework, and review for exams and tests. This is especially useful for technical courses, like chemistry and biology, where significant amounts of detailed information are presented during each class lecture. (Fernandez, Simo, Sallian, 2009)
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5. How can lecture capture benefit faculty?
  • Faculty also benefit from lecture capture in a variety of ways. Here are just a few: faculty can save time by presenting a lecture only once, with the ability to use it multiple times; students can be directed back to the recorded lecture, if they miss class or have clarification questions; and (with Tegrity) faculty can rely on student notations during the lectures to better understand where there were common points of confusion or questions. Additionally, faculty can create mini-lectures of supplemental content, which can be accessed by only those students who most need it and opt to use it.
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6. How do faculty use lecture capture?
  • There are no hard-and-fast rules about how instructors use lecture capture. The usual approach is to use the classroom system (in our case, Tegrity) to record the instructor's PowerPoint slides (or any other content displayed on the instructor's computer) and to record the actual lecture audio. Because most students use LC to review their notes and for exams, it is good practice for the instructor to add annotations and notes to a LC recording after it has been recorded if the software allows it. Some instructors record their lectures outside of the classroom, then require the students to view/listen to the recorded lecture as homework, in preparation for the next class meeting. Then, during class time, students work problems and examples, while the instructor is present to help troubleshoot. This increasingly more common approach is sometimes referred to as "classroom flipping," since the typical content of a class period is "flipped" to homework, and homework (e.g., applied problems, case studies, etc.) is brought into the class period. This option is particularly welcome for instructors who wish to build more interactive learning into their classes.
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7. What conditions make LC most useful?
  • While recording and offering only audio versions of lectures are shown to be useful, the most benefit comes when instructors are able to record their presentation (PowerPoint, etc., or document camera) synced with the audio. Providing video of the instructor presenting the material, or having an image in its place, did not demonstrate any significant improvements in student performance or engagement. (Petherbridge, 2010)
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8. What student privacy considerations are there with lecture capture?
  • It depends on the situation. The same privacy considerations that would apply in a brick and mortar classroom, particularly to student work, apply to a lecture capture broadcast. Tegrity is primarily intended to extend accessibility of the lecture experience to students who have registered for a specific course, for a specific period of time (e.g., semester). If Tegrity is used to disseminate student presentations, small group discussions, or seminar classes beyond a defined course, faculty members will be responsible for obtaining student consent prior to distribution. Click here for a consent form. Faculty members are not required to obtain student consent when broadcasting their own image and content; when no student participation is recorded; or when incidental student participation is recorded and the broadcast is directed to a defined course.
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9. What copyright considerations are there with lecture capture?
  • Faculty, staff, and students are responsible for observing copyright law including educational fair use guidelines, obtaining appropriate permission from the copyright holder, and following University policies when incorporating third party content into a Tegrity recording. Captured lectures that contain short excerpts from a third party may be eligible for dissemination without permission subject to educational fair use guidelines. For more detail, please see the University's Copyright Policy here.
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10. Can students duplicate or redistribute recorded lectures?
  • No. In all cases, duplication or redistribution by students is prohibited. Students may not copy or redistribute lecture capture materials without the express, written permission of the course instructor. Unauthorized duplication or dissemination of lecture capture materials may violate federal or state law and University policy. Violation of University policy may result in disciplinary action.
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11. Where are recorded files stored?
  • Lectures recorded through Tegrity are stored in the Tegrity cloud (Tegrity's servers) but can be downloaded in multiple formats at the discretion of the instructor. Instructors and students can access these files either by going directly to Tegrity (https://slu.tegrity.com) or by going through Blackboard Learn.
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12. Are the files stored at Tegrity secure?
  • Tegrity is a cloud based service. Recorded lectures are stored on Tegrity's secure servers. Tegrity's default setting limits access of captured content to those individuals with appropriate access to the course in Blackboard Learn. Faculty have the option of extending access.
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Student Considerations

1. Can I make lectures of my own?
2. What are the privacy considerations for me in lecture capture?
3. What formats are available for captured lectures?
4. Why doesn't my professor put lectures in downloadable formats?

1. Can I make lectures of my own?

  • Yes. There are lots of reasons you might wish to record a lecture or other type of presentation (e.g., you could review it as a self-assessment in preparation for an in-class presentation).
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2. What are the privacy considerations for me in lecture capture?

  • For the most part, there aren't any, as long as you are recording your own lecture / presentation.
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3. What formats are available for captured lectures?

  • There are several formats available within the system, including formats for streaming audio/video and downloadable formats. Instructors will decide which ones are used within their courses, based on their own priorities and the nature of their content. The default format for Tegrity at SLU is Tegrity's streaming format based upon Windows Media Server. Instructors may also choose to make lectures available in downloadable formats, such as MP3 (audio only) or M4V (audio and presentation - MP4). However, instructors cannot do this for lectures that contact copyrighted or other protected material.
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4. Why doesn't my professor put lectures in downloadable formats?

  • In most cases, faculty make recorded material available to be used by students in a single course, in single semester. While the the default mode for recorded lectures in Tegrity is a streaming format, proprietary to Tegrity, instructors can choose to make recorded lectures downloadable, but they may decide not to do so for a variety of reasons, including intellectual property issues, copyright protection, etc.
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Resources

Relevant SLU Policies / Procedures

Campus Resources

  • For technical issues related to Tegrity: For tips on how to use the Tegrity tool at SLU, including things related to: technical matters, file formats, making files available to students, editing recordings, etc., please go to http://slu.edu/capture.
  • For copyright permission / licensing for course materials: To request assistance with copyright permissions for materials used in class, please consult the SLU Libraries. Information on copyright and fair use can be found on the SLU Libraries website.
  • For legal issues related to copyright and/or FERPA: Contact the Office of the General Counsel at (314) 977-2506.
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References / For Further Research

Fernandez, Vicenc, Pep Simo, and Jose M. Sallan.
Podcasting: A new technological tool to facilitate good practice in higher education.

Zhu, Erping and Inger Bergom.
Lecture Capture: A Guide for Effective Use.

Petherbridge, Donna.
Lecture Capture - Annotated Bibliography.

Student Surveys and Opinions from UNC Charlotte
http://teaching.uncc.edu/learning-resources/articles-books/tip-sheets/lecture-capture
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