Supply Chain Management Programs

Through our Center for Supply Chain Management, Saint Louis University offers programs that allow every member of the supply chain industry significant opportunities to improve both corporate profitability and return on assets.

Members of the Center for Supply Chain Management can redeem member discounts on the program tuition. Contact the center at 314-977-3617 or cscms@slu.edu to obtain your discount code before beginning the registration process.

Integrated Supply Chain Management Program

SLU’s Integrated Supply Chain Management Certificate Program offers comprehensive management development techniques and tools for professionals involved in inventory management, purchasing, warehousing/transportation, project management, lean principles in the overall supply chain pipeline.

This certificate program is designed for those who have at least three years of experience in any of the functional areas of supply chain management.

A candidate who completes the certificate requirements within an 18-month period will receive a certificate of completion from Saint Louis University Center for Supply Chain Management.

This non-academic credit certificate will establish a permanent record within the John Cook School of Business at Saint Louis University, documenting the recipient’s exposure to state-of-the-art supply chain management techniques. Each of the required seminars will be offered at least twice a year.

Outcomes

Participants will:

  • Obtain the ability to identify and analyze a supply chain’s functions, processes and activities, including their interactions within a firm, as well as across firms that create cost to cost and cost to service trade-offs.
  • Develop an understanding of the role of managing supply chain inventories in the business environment.
  • Identify specific customer service variables (the output of the supply chain process) that will provide a differential advantage in the marketplace.
  • Understand the role of managing supply chain inventories in the business environment.
  • Understand the supply chain system components and their inter-relationships within individual companies.
  • Understand a variety of analytical tools, skills and techniques that can be used to solve supply chain problems.
  • Gain an understanding of the role of logistics/supply chain management in business, government and military environments.
  • Gain an understanding of the system components of a typical logistics network, including their inter-relationships.

Registration

Individuals may take the modules as stand-alone courses, but to be awarded the certificate all modules must be registered for and completed.

Unless otherwise noted, courses meet at the following times and locations:

  • Registration and breakfast: 7:30 a.m.
  • Course: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Location: Cook Hall, Room 230

Fall 2017 Schedule

  • Finance for Supply Chain Professionals: Aug. 24
  • Supply Chain Simulation and Project Management: Aug. 25
  • Managing Inventories for Increased Profitability: Sept. 21-22
  • Quality and Change Management: Oct. 5
  • Reducing and Mitigating Variability: Oct. 6
  • Strategic Sourcing and Supplier Relationship Management: Oct. 19-20
  • Business Analytics: Nov. 3
  • Sales and Operations Planning: Nov. 10
  • Transportation and Warehouse Management: Nov. 16-17
  • Project Presentations and Graduation: Dec. 8
Global Supply Chain Management Certificate Program

SLU’s Global Supply Chain Management Certificate prepares individuals for positions as managers, directors and integral leaders within corporate supply chains. Students emerge with strengthened leadership abilities in the areas of strategic and operational alignment, global business practices and the overall execution, control and oversight needed to build a competitive global infrastructure. Students engage in both classroom and experiential-based learning opportunities within the areas of global trade and compliance, international trade law, cyber-security, global sustainability and much more.

This certificate program is designed for those who have at least three years of experience in any of the functional areas of supply chain management.

A candidate who completes the certificate requirements within an 18-month period will receive a certificate of completion from Saint Louis University Center for Supply Chain Management.

This non-academic credit certificate will establish a permanent record within the John Cook School of Business at Saint Louis University, documenting the recipient’s exposure to state-of-the-art supply chain management techniques. Each of the required seminars will be offered at least twice a year.

Registration

Individuals may take the modules as stand-alone courses, but in order to be awarded the certificate all modules must be registered for and completed.

Unless otherwise noted, courses meet at the following times and locations:

  • Registration and breakfast 7:30 a.m.
  • Course: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
  • Class Location: Cook Hall, Room 230

Spring 2017 Schedule

  • Global Trade Management Compliance: Feb. 9-10
  • Global Trade Legal Environment: March 16
  • Global Supply Chain Security: March 17
  • Risk Management: April 10
  • Supply Chain Trade Operations: May 4-5
Business Analytics

Business analytics is the art of analyzing business data for decision-making. In the context of supply chain management, business analytics is about combining supply chain related data and solve specific SCM problems. An example of such problem is finalizing a location of a new distribution center by analyzing the variables: city population, cost of living, proximity to suppliers, customers, ports and airports.

This course provides a foundation for analytical concepts, techniques and tools required for supply-chain decision-making. Participants learn the basic concepts of analytics and acquire necessary skills for developing business dashboards. They also get hands-on exposure to business analytics software and create visualizations to solve specific SCM problems.

Topic preview:

  • Importance of analytics in supply chain management
  • Key database and statistical concepts related to analytics
  • Developing supply chain metrics
  • Business dashboard design
  • Supply chain based decision making with current analytics tools

Participants learn to:

  • Develop supply chain metrics for analysis
  • Combine different dashboard components such as containers, maps, and charts
  • Use supply chain metrics to develop business dashboards
  • Analyze supply chain dashboards for decision-making

Registration

Individuals have the option to take both Part I and Part II of the program or they may opt to only take one module.

Unless otherwise noted, courses meet at the following times and locations:

  • Registration and breakfast 7:30 a.m.
  • Course: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Class Location: Cook Hall, Room 230

Fall 2017 Schedule

  • Business Analytics, Palash Bera, Ph.D., on Nov. 3, 2017

Register Online

Quality and Change Management

There’s no escaping change. And organizations that cling to the tried and true — whether it be existing business models and processes or perceptions of market conditions and customer preferences — are doomed to continually play catch-up in the marketplace, and may eventually go out of business.

Even recognizing the inevitability of change isn’t the same as managing the challenges it presents. Satisfactory change management isn’t enough, however. Change and quality management are dynamic equilibriums for successful organizations, and quality is required as the central component of success. Yet, experience and the literature demonstrates that modern, post-industrial projects often mention quality, but only nominally employ it.

Facilitating change is more critical now than ever as organizations are affected by economic conditions and are driven to improve efficiency, productivity and quality. This program establishes a comprehensive quality and change approach that lets organizations and individuals model change and quality leadership. The coursework is immediately applied to your current situations through application exercises, case studies and interactive program modules. Stop struggling to implement quality and change into your corporate strategic endeavors. Work through the complexities of the process to effectively integrate quality expertise and to employ change management solutions that drive business success.

This presentation offers students a multi-faceted approach to integrating change and quality management efforts by assimilating key concepts in a way that ensures the correctness of the deliverables.

Through the science of modern disciplines and via the application of a practical implementation by the quality and change manager, the team is guided to the timely delivery of customer needs and organizational promises.

The program format is both online and interactive. The students participate in individual exercises online. Case study methods are also used to enhance the real world nature of this course.

Fall 2017 Schedule

  • Quality and Change Management: Oct. 5, 2017

Register Online

Finance for Supply Chain Professionals

Implementation of a supply chain is expensive and risky. It requires substantial investment in the areas of finance and human capital with unknown results. Supply chain operations profoundly impact a company’s income and financial statements in various ways, including purchasing, sourcing, product design, manufacturing, transportation, logistics, packaging, storage and distributions. Nevertheless, many supply chain professionals have no or little knowledge of how their work contributes to the financial and income statements. Days inventory, days in sales outstanding and days in payable profoundly affect the company’s cash flow.

The purpose of this one-day workshop is to outline how integrated supply chain tools improve the financial health of companies. Fundamentals of supply chain principles have to be firmly in place before any attempts to use expensive information technologies and supply chain tools. Key metrics that contribute to a company’s financial health will be addressed to understand the basics of financial and income ow within and between supply chain partners.

Topic preview

  • Fundamentals of supply chain principles
  • Common traits for top supply chain performers
  • Fundamentals of income statements
  • Profitability: Return on investment, return on asset and economic profit
  • Return on equity
  • Flow of financial information within supply chain networks
  • Days in inventory

Fall 2017 Schedule

  • Finance for Supply Chain Managers Aug. 25

Register Online

Global Legal Trade Environment

International trade is the exchange of capital, goods and services across international borders or territories. In most countries, such trade represents a significant share of the gross domestic product. While international trade has been present throughout much of history, the economic, social and political importance has increased. Industrialization, advanced transportation, globalization, multinational corporations, and outsourcing are all having a major impact on the international trade system.

Topic preview:

  • An overview of trade compliance
  • Key FCPA and other compliance regulations
  • Compliance and security strategies
  • Key U.S. agencies that control exports
  • INCO terms and recent changes
  • Export compliance
  • Import compliance
  • Resources for compliance assistance and information

Spring 2018 Schedule

  • Global Trade Management Compliance, Feb. 9-10
Global Supply Chain Security

Supply chain security refers to efforts to enhance the security of the supply chain, the transport and logistics system for the world’s cargo. It combines traditional practices of supply chain management with the security requirements driven by threats such as terrorism, piracy and theft. Guaranteeing acceptable conditions in a global supply chain can be a complex challenge. As part of their efforts to demonstrate ethical practices, many large companies and global brands are integrating codes of conduct and guidelines into their corporate cultures and management systems. Through these, corporations are making demands on their suppliers (facilities, farms, subcontracted services such as cleaning, canteen, security, etc.) and verifying, through social audits, that they are complying with the required standard.

Topic preview:

  • Risk and rewards of global security participation
  • The role of the World Trade Organization and U.S. regulation
  • Key global security programs
  • Organizational preparedness
  • Domestic and foreign site validation
  • Security practices and compliance
  • Importance of senior management endorsement
  • Best practices for program certification

Spring 2018 Schedule

  • Global Supply Chain Security, March 17

Register Online

Lean Logistics Program

A goal of lean logistics is to eliminate waste, decrease work-in-process inventories, and, in turn, decrease process and manufacturing lead-times; ultimately increasing supply chain velocity and flow. Supply chain velocity and flow are paramount to lean thinking, as the ultimate goal of lean is to improve organizational effectiveness and profitability.

Lean logistics also has a vital cultural element that is crucial to the logistician.

The lean practitioner does not focus on individual cost factors such as transportation or warehousing, but rather, it focuses on “total logistics cost.” With inventory carrying costs representing 15 to 40 percent of total logistics costs for many industries, making decisions based on total cost has dramatic implications for the logistician.

This program includes both lectures and interactive formats. Students participate in individual and group exercises. Case study methods are also used to enhance the real-world nature of this course.

Target audience:

  • Supply chain professionals at all levels
  • Logistics professionals at all levels
  • Material managers
  • Production control managers transportation, warehousing and purchasing managers

Outcomes

Participants learn to:

  • Analyze and articulate demand and demand patterns on the logistics network
  • Understand logistics from a “systems” point of view
  • Begin the development of a lean logistics operational strategy
  • Gain awareness to more fully understand and calculate total logistics cost
  • Identify and eliminate waste in the logistics network
  • Develop a lean logistics tool kit and understanding of how to use these lean tools in the logistics function
  • Articulate the value of logistics to overall organizational performance
  • Overcome the constraints when bridging logistics planning and operational realities
  • Understand the importance of cross-functional teamwork in the logistics function
  • Reduce inventories, reduce costs and significantly increase operational performance
Managing Inventories for Increased Profitability

Inventory management is a science primarily about specifying the shape and percentage of stocked goods. It is required at different locations within a facility or within many locations of a supply network to precede the regular and planned course of production and stock of materials.

The scope of inventory management concerns the fine lines between replenishment lead time, carrying costs of inventory, asset management, inventory forecasting, inventory valuation, inventory visibility, future inventory price forecasting, physical inventory, available physical space for inventory, quality management, replenishment, returns and defective goods and demand forecasting. Balancing these competing requirements leads to optimal inventory levels, which is an ongoing process as the business needs shift and react to the wider environment.

Management of the inventories, with the primary objective of determining/controlling stock levels within the physical distribution system, functions to balance the need for product availability against the need for minimizing stock holding and handling costs.

Topic preview:

  • Importance of inventory as an investment
  • Functions of inventory
  • Sales and operations planning
  • Forecasting
  • Inventory stratification and analysis
  • Service levels and safety stock
  • Performance metrics
  • Current topics affecting inventory management

Participants learn:

  • The importance of inventory to the enterprise
  • To describe the critical functions of inventory in the supply chain
  • How to apply sales and operations planning concepts to optimize supply chain performance
  • How to understand methods and value of inventory stratification
  • About selected “tools” for managing inventory management
  • How to use metrics in managing inventory

Fall 2017 Schedule

  • Managing Inventories for Increased Profitability, Sept. 21-22
Negotiations

Negotiation occurs in business, non-profit organizations, government branches, legal proceedings, among nations, and in personal situations such as marriage, divorce, parenting, and everyday life.

The study of the subject is called negotiation theory. Professional negotiators are often specialized, such as union negotiators, leverage buyout negotiators, peace negotiators, hostage negotiators, or may work under other titles, such as diplomats, legislators or brokers.

Topic preview:

  • What is negotiation?
  • Different negotiation strategies
  • Negotiation tactics
  • How to achieve compromise
  • Negotiation styles
  • Types of negotiators
  • Understanding non-verbal communications
  • Team negotiations

Outcomes

Participants learn to:

  • Achieve the best negotiated solution
  • Use specific strategies in specific situations
  • Understand the other parties negotiation style
  • Understand aspects of communication that can help ensure negotiation success
  • Decipher when team negotiations are best
  • Work successfully with differing negotiation styles
  • Utilize current trends in negotiation
  • Integrate lessons learned from other business organizations

Registration

Unless otherwise noted, courses meet at the following times and locations:

  • Registration and breakfast 7:30 a.m.
  • Course: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Class Location: Cook Hall, Room 230

Spring 2018 Schedule 

Negotiations, April 6-7, 2017

Register Online

Project Management

Project management knowledge, skills and tools provide the processes and mechanisms for effectively implementing change in the complex supply chain management environment.

The need for effective project management techniques continues to grow as supply chain managers face challenges created by the geographical distribution of systems, the outsourcing of development and maintenance activities and the increased reliance on enterprise system software.

This two-day workshop provides a basic introduction to the various concepts and techniques of project management in enough detail to be immediately useful in the working environment.

Project management is an expansive domain that merits continued and extensive study. This workshops focuses on the project management concepts and techniques needed from the early stages of the project through execution.

Outcomes

Participants learn to:

  • Identify supply chain project managers in the St. Louis area
  • Identify the project management life cycle for a supply chain project
  • Understand Variances in supply chain “organizational” structures to support projects
  • Use methods to clarify the project scope, business objective, project objective and stakeholder analysis
  • Identify and articulate project assumptions and constraints.
  • How to consider process integration in project scope and definition
  • Prepare a project communication plan that acknowledges the supply chain project network
  • Assess resource requirements and approach assigning resources.
  • Identify and plan for risk (including socio-cultural risk)

Project Management and Supply Chain Simulation (fall session)

This one-day workshop is a part of the Integrated Supply Chain Management Certificate Program managed by the Center for Supply Chain Management at Saint Louis University.

A supply chain is a complex structure involving multiple partners, companies and even countries. Communication is vital to the ability of the supply chain to meet customer needs while effectively utilizing resources. Through a simple simulation, participants understand the importance of clear communication in a supply chain. Operating in teams, they use financial metrics and dashboards to measure the success of their efforts.

As part of the Integrated Supply Chain Management Certificate Program, teams select and complete a process improvement project for a company of their choosing. This project must completed within the time frame of the certificate program. The workshop equips them with basic project management concepts and tools that will support successful completion of the selected project.

Outcomes

Participants learn:

  • How to perform a computer-based, multi-cycle supply chain simulation
  • How to identify issues arising from the simulation, suggest improvements, and test a revised simulation scenario
  • How to form project teams and evaluate possible supply chain projects to be completed within the Integrated Supply Chain Certificate program
  • The four phases of a project
  • About the key tools used in preparing and executing a successful project plan

Registration

Individuals have the option to take both Part I and Part II of the program or they may opt to only take one module.

Unless otherwise noted, courses meet at the following times and locations:

  • Registration and breakfast 7:30 a.m.
  • Course: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Class Location: Cook Hall, Room 230

Fall 2017 Schedule

  • Project Management and Supply Chain Simulation Aug. 25

Register Online

Risk Management
 

Risks can come from uncertainty in financial markets, project failures (at any phase in design, development, production, or sustainment life-cycles), legal liabilities, credit risk, accidents, natural causes and disasters.

Risk management is the identification, assessment and prioritization of risks (defined in ISO 31000 as the effect of uncertainty on objectives, whether positive or negative) followed by coordinated and economical application of resources to minimize, monitor and control the probability or impact of unfortunate events or to maximize the realization of opportunities.

The strategies to manage risk typically include transferring the risk to another party, avoiding the risk, reducing the negative effect or probability of the risk, or even accepting some or all of the potential or actual consequences of a particular risk.

Topic preview

  • Perspectives in supply chain risk
  • Supply chain risk domains and methods
  • Risk related to strategic control chain
  • Technology risks
  • Supply chain structure and incentive alignment
  • Boheedrop’s supply chain risk matrix
  • Organizing for supply chain risk

Outcomes

Participants learn:

  • How to identify key capabilities and competencies for risk management
  • The importance of leadership in the risk management process
  • How to develop roadmaps for deploying risk management systems
  • About the total value of risk in supply chain
  • Emerging trends and practices
  • How to develop risk analysis framework
  • How to organize supply chain risk

Risk Management (global program)

Risk management is the identification, assessment and prioritization of risks followed by coordinated and economical application of resources to minimize, monitor and control the probability or impact of unfortunate events or to maximize the realization of opportunities.

Risks can come from uncertainty in financial markets, project failures (at any phase in design, development, production or sustainment life-cycles), legal liabilities, credit risk, accidents, natural causes and disasters. The strategies to manage risk typically include transferring the risk to another party, avoiding the risk, reducing the negative effect or probability of the risk, or even accepting some or all of the potential or actual consequences of a particular risk.

Topic preview:

  • Perspectives in supply chain risk
  • Supply chain risk domains and methods
  • Risks related to strategic control chain
  • Technology risks
  • Supply chain structure and incentive alignment
  • Boheedrop’s supply chain risk matrix
  • Organizing for supply chain risk
  • What is at the heart of supply chain risk?

Spring 2018 Schedule

  • Negotiations April 10, 2017

Register Online

Strategic Sourcing and Supplier Relationship Management

Strategic sourcing is an institutional procurement process that continuously improves and re-evaluates the purchasing activities of a company. Procurement is the acquisition of goods, services or works from an external source. It is favorable that the goods, services or works are appropriate and that they are procured at the best possible cost to meet the need of the purchaser in terms of quality and quantity, time and location. Corporations and public bodies offer define processes intended to promote fair and open competition for their business while minimizing exposure to fraud and collusion.

Supplier relationship management (SRM) is the discipline of strategically planning for and managing all interactions with third-party organizations that supply goods or services to an organization to maximize the value of those interactions. In practice, SRM entails creating closer, more collaborative relationships with key suppliers to uncover and realize new value and reduce risk.

Topic preview:

  • What is strategic sourcing?
  • Total cost and decision-making process
  • The importance of systems thinking and stability
  • Global sourcing issues
  • How to calculate total cost
  • Supplier relationships
  • Supplier collaboration
  • Supplier evaluation and scorecards

Participants learn:

  • How to determine total landed cost and the importance of it
  • To determine when to buy versus make
  • To understand long-term supply requirements
  • Determine appropriate supplier categories based spend
  • How to manage supplier performance
  • System performance stability techniques
  • The complexities of global sourcing
  • Techniques to measure, evaluate and manage suppliers and costs

Fall 2017 Schedule

Strategic Sourcing and Supplier Relationship Management, Oct. 19-20

Register Online

Sales and Operations Program

Sales and operations planning (S&OP) is an integrated business management process developed by Oliver Wright through which the executive/leadership team continually achieves focus, alignment and synchronization among all functions of the organization.

S&OP planning includes an updated forecast that leads to a sales plan, production plan, inventory plan, customer lead-time (backlog) plan, new product development plan, strategic initiative plan and resulting financial plan.

Plan frequency and planning horizon depend on the specifics of the industry. Short product life cycles and high demand volatility require a tighter S&OP planning than a steadily consumed product.

An effective S&OP process routinely reviews customer demand and supply resources and “re-plans” quantitatively across an agreed rolling horizon. The re-planning process focuses on changes from the previously agreed sales and operations plan.

While it helps the management team to understand how the company achieved its current level of performance, its primary focus is on future actions and anticipated results.

Companies that have an integrated business management process use the S&OP process to monitor the execution of their strategies.

Topic preview:

  • Establishing production plans
  • How S&OP help improve business
  • How to manage forecasts
  • The critical nature of S&OP and customer service
  • Resource planning to meet demand requirements
  • S&OP and strategic issues
  • How to optimize S&OP based with organizational constraints

Outcomes

Participants learn:

  • Create forecasts for demand management
  • Develop S&OP plans
  • Use resource planning to validate S&OP
  • Establish performance metrics
  • Initiate corrective actions
  • Disaggregate S&OP from the master schedule
  • Develop teamwork to achieve S&OP objectives

Registration

Unless otherwise noted, courses meet at the following times and locations:

  • Registration and breakfast 7:30 a.m.
  • Course: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Class Location: Cook Hall, Room 230

Fall 2017 Schedule

  • Sales and Operation Planning Nov. 10, 2017

Register Online

Supply Chain Management 101

Our Supply Chain Management 101 workshop introduces basic supply chain tools that have been used in industries, public sectors, health care areas and other fields. It is known from various research studies that strategic use of supply chain tools has a significant impact on financial statements.

The Supply Chain Management 101 workshop attempts to demonstrate the link between successful use of supply chain principles and tools and financial performance of firms.

Target audience

This workshop is intended for beginners to supply chain management or professionals who are not directly involved in daily supply chain operations but wish to know more about the discipline. It has drawn people from the fields of accounting, law, health care, marketing, finance, information technology and professionals from the supply chain area who wish to refresh their skills.

Outcomes

Participants learn:

  • To understand supply chain management concepts and principles
  • How to engage supply chain management tools
  • How to manage supply chain costs
  • How to evaluate supply chain management performance in financial statement
  • To understand the key measures of supply chain management performances
  • To identify supply chain management improvement opportunities

Schedule

  • Introduction to Supply Chain Management, Aug. 19, 2016
  • Introduction to Supply Chain Management, Jan. 20, 2017

Register Online

Supply Chain Trade Operations

Explore the variety of regulations, procedures, financial tools, and documents that are necessary to successfully trade goods from one region of the globe to another. Topics will include market risk analysis, transaction process flow, tools such as credit insurance, internet-based bank documentation, and services and resources provided by national and international organizations. Frequent guest speakers will share their experience and advice in conducting business globally, with an emphasis on the challenges faced within emerging markets.

With improvements in transportation and communication, international business grew rapidly after the beginning of the 20th century. International business includes all commercial transactions (that take place between two or more regions, countries and nations beyond their political boundary. Such international diversification is tied with firm performance and innovation.

Topic preview:

  • Strategic or not?
  • Components of global operations
  • The global trade process
  • Developing the scope of global trade operations
  • Organizational alignment
  • Managing global trade
  • Global trade and compliance and the performance continuum
  • Global trade policy

What you will learn:

  • An understanding of global trade management
  • How the process affects business performance
  • The role of 3PL and other service providers in international trade
  • The best process to ensure organizational alignment
  • Key regulatory and compliance issues
  • Best practices in global trade

Spring 2017 Schedule

Supply Chain Trade Operations,  May 4-5, 2017

Register Online

Transportation and Warehouse Management

Transportation is the movement of goods from one location to another. Modes of transport include air, rail, road, water, cable, pipeline and space. The field can be divided into infrastructure, vehicle and operations. Transportation infrastructure consists of the fixed installations necessary for transport, including roads, railway, airway, waterways, canals and pipelines and terminals such as airports, railway stations, bus stations, warehousing, trucking terminals, refueling depots (including fueling docks and fuel stations) and seaports. Terminals may be used both for the interchange of passengers and cargo and for maintenance.

Warehouse management involves the receipt, storage and movement of goods (normally finished goods) to intermediate storage locations or a final customer. In the multi-echelon model for distribution there may be multiple levels of warehouses. This includes a central warehouse,  regional warehouses (serviced by the central warehouse) and potentially retail warehouses (serviced by the regional warehouses). Warehouse design and process design within the warehouse (e.g. wave picking) is also part of warehouse management.

Topic preview:

  • Why supply chain management?
  • The supply chain and financial performance
  • Deploying the supply chain
  • Supply performance measurement
  • Selected SCM tools
  • Efficient customer response
  • Collaborative management
  • SRM (supplier relationship management)

Participants learn:

  • The fundamental concepts of supply chain management
  • The basic design of a supply chain
  • To understand how supply chain operations affect financial statements
  • How best in class companies outperform the competition
  • Gain an understanding selected tools used in supply chain management
  • How to use metrics in managing supply chain performance
  • An awareness of the trends in supply chain management

Fall 2017 Schedule

  • Transportation and Warehouse Management, Nov. 16-17

Register Online

Variability in Supply Chain Program

Variability is the dominant cause of mismatches between supply and demand, from daily inflections in demand to large-scale supply chain disruptions.

In this course, we examine the influence of variability throughout the supply chain, from its impact on simples processes to its effect on complex networks. We also discuss variability mitigation strategies designed to improve supply chain responsiveness and profitability.

The course material applies to a broad audience from executives to tactical-level employees. Both manufacturing and service industries employees will benefit from the topics covered.

Topic preview:

  • Understanding the impact of variability
  • Supply chain performance evaluation
  • Influence of variability on supply chain performance
  • Variability reeducation and mitigation of supply variances
  • Variability reduction strategies
  • Variability buffering
  • Variability pooling

Outcomes

Participants learn:

  • The relationship among the key supply chain performance measures
  • The impact of variability on WIP, decreasing flow rate and decreasing flow time
  • Why high utilization intensifies the effects on variability
  • Strategies to reduce processing time and input variability
  • Tactics to buffer against variability via inventor, capacity and time
  • Why variability pooling can decrease the amount of buffering required to achieve a given level of performance

Registration

Unless otherwise noted, courses meet at the following times and locations:

  • Registration and breakfast 7:30 a.m.
  • Course: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Class Location: Cook Hall, Room 230

Schedule 

  • Reducing and Mitigating Variability in the Supply Chain, Oct. 6

Register Online