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Supply Chain Management Programs

Through the Center for Supply Chain Management, the Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business offers programs that provide every member of the supply chain industry significant opportunities to improve both corporate profitability and return on assets.

The certificate programs are designed for those who have at least three years of experience in any of the functional areas of supply chain management.

A candidate who completes the certificate requirements within an 18-month period will receive a certificate of completion from Saint Louis University Center for Supply Chain Management. This non-academic credit certificate will establish a permanent record within the Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business at Saint Louis University, documenting the recipient’s exposure to state-of-the-art supply chain management techniques. 

Members of the Center for Supply Chain Management can redeem member discounts on program tuition. Contact the center at 314-977-3617 or cscms@slu.edu to obtain your discount code before beginning the registration process.

Integrated Supply Chain Management Certificate 

SLU’s Integrated Supply Chain Management Certificate offers comprehensive management development techniques and tools for professionals involved in inventory management, purchasing, warehousing/transportation, project management, lean principles in the overall supply chain pipeline. The certificate program is offered in the fall and includes the following courses. 

Business Analytics

Business analytics is the art of analyzing business data for decision-making. In the context of supply chain management, business analytics is about combining supply chain related data and solve specific SCM problems. An example of such problem is finalizing a location of a new distribution center by analyzing the variables: city population, cost of living, proximity to suppliers, customers, ports and airports.

This course provides a foundation for analytical concepts, techniques and tools required for supply-chain decision-making. Participants learn the basic concepts of analytics and acquire necessary skills for developing business dashboards. They also get hands-on exposure to business analytics software and create visualizations to solve specific SCM problems.

Topic preview:

  • Importance of analytics in supply chain management
  • Key database and statistical concepts related to analytics
  • Developing supply chain metrics
  • Business dashboard design
  • Supply chain based decision making with current analytics tools

Participants learn to:

  • Develop supply chain metrics for analysis
  • Combine different dashboard components such as containers, maps, and charts
  • Use supply chain metrics to develop business dashboards
  • Analyze supply chain dashboards for decision-making
Finance for Supply Chain Professionals

Implementation of a supply chain is expensive and risky. It requires substantial investment in the areas of finance and human capital with unknown results. Supply chain operations profoundly impact a company’s income and financial statements in various ways, including purchasing, sourcing, product design, manufacturing, transportation, logistics, packaging, storage and distributions. Nevertheless, many supply chain professionals have no or little knowledge of how their work contributes to the financial and income statements. Days inventory, days in sales outstanding and days in payable profoundly affect the company’s cash flow.

The purpose of this one-day workshop is to outline how integrated supply chain tools improve the financial health of companies. Fundamentals of supply chain principles have to be firmly in place before any attempts to use expensive information technologies and supply chain tools. Key metrics that contribute to a company’s financial health will be addressed to understand the basics of financial and income ow within and between supply chain partners.

Topic preview:

  • Fundamentals of supply chain principles
  • Common traits for top supply chain performers
  • Fundamentals of income statements
  • Profitability: Return on investment, return on asset and economic profit
  • Return on equity
  • Flow of financial information within supply chain networks
  • Days in inventory
Managing Inventories for Increased Profitability

Inventory management is a science primarily about specifying the shape and percentage of stocked goods. It is required at different locations within a facility or within many locations of a supply network to precede the regular and planned course of production and stock of materials.

The scope of inventory management concerns the fine lines between replenishment lead time, carrying costs of inventory, asset management, inventory forecasting, inventory valuation, inventory visibility, future inventory price forecasting, physical inventory, available physical space for inventory, quality management, replenishment, returns and defective goods and demand forecasting. Balancing these competing requirements leads to optimal inventory levels, which is an ongoing process as the business needs shift and react to the wider environment.

Management of the inventories, with the primary objective of determining/controlling stock levels within the physical distribution system, functions to balance the need for product availability against the need for minimizing stock holding and handling costs.

Topic preview:

  • Importance of inventory as an investment
  • Functions of inventory
  • Sales and operations planning
  • Forecasting
  • Inventory stratification and analysis
  • Service levels and safety stock
  • Performance metrics
  • Current topics affecting inventory management

Participants learn:

  • The importance of inventory to the enterprise
  • To describe the critical functions of inventory in the supply chain
  • How to apply sales and operations planning concepts to optimize supply chain performance
  • How to understand methods and value of inventory stratification
  • About selected “tools” for managing inventory management
  • How to use metrics in managing inventory
Project Management

This one-day workshop is a part of the Integrated Supply Chain Management Certificate Program managed by the Center for Supply Chain Management at Saint Louis University.

A supply chain is a complex structure involving multiple partners, companies and even countries. Communication is vital to the ability of the supply chain to meet customer needs while effectively utilizing resources. Through a simple simulation, participants understand the importance of clear communication in a supply chain. Operating in teams, they use financial metrics and dashboards to measure the success of their efforts.

As part of the Integrated Supply Chain Management Certificate Program, teams select and complete a process improvement project for a company of their choosing. This project must completed within the time frame of the certificate program. The workshop equips them with basic project management concepts and tools that will support successful completion of the selected project.

Participants learn:

  • How to perform a computer-based, multi-cycle supply chain simulation
  • How to identify issues arising from the simulation, suggest improvements, and test a revised simulation scenario
  • How to form project teams and evaluate possible supply chain projects to be completed within the Integrated Supply Chain Certificate program
  • The four phases of a project
  • About the key tools used in preparing and executing a successful project plan
Strategic Sourcing and Supplier Relationship Management

Strategic sourcing is an institutional procurement process that continuously improves and re-evaluates the purchasing activities of a company. Procurement is the acquisition of goods, services or works from an external source. It is favorable that the goods, services or works are appropriate and that they are procured at the best possible cost to meet the need of the purchaser in terms of quality and quantity, time and location. Corporations and public bodies offer define processes intended to promote fair and open competition for their business while minimizing exposure to fraud and collusion.

Supplier relationship management (SRM) is the discipline of strategically planning for and managing all interactions with third-party organizations that supply goods or services to an organization to maximize the value of those interactions. In practice, SRM entails creating closer, more collaborative relationships with key suppliers to uncover and realize new value and reduce risk.

Topic preview:

  • What is strategic sourcing?
  • Total cost and decision-making process
  • The importance of systems thinking and stability
  • Global sourcing issues
  • How to calculate total cost
  • Supplier relationships
  • Supplier collaboration
  • Supplier evaluation and scorecards

Participants learn:

  • How to determine total landed cost and the importance of it
  • To determine when to buy versus make
  • To understand long-term supply requirements
  • Determine appropriate supplier categories based spend
  • How to manage supplier performance
  • System performance stability techniques
  • The complexities of global sourcing
  • Techniques to measure, evaluate and manage suppliers and costs
Sales and operations planning  

Sales and operations planning (S&OP) is an integrated business management process developed by Oliver Wright through which the executive/leadership team continually achieves focus, alignment and synchronization among all functions of the organization.

S&OP planning includes an updated forecast that leads to a sales plan, production plan, inventory plan, customer lead-time (backlog) plan, new product development plan, strategic initiative plan and resulting financial plan.

Plan frequency and planning horizon depend on the specifics of the industry. Short product life cycles and high demand volatility require a tighter S&OP planning than a steadily consumed product.

An effective S&OP process routinely reviews customer demand and supply resources and “re-plans” quantitatively across an agreed rolling horizon. The re-planning process focuses on changes from the previously agreed sales and operations plan.

While it helps the management team to understand how the company achieved its current level of performance, its primary focus is on future actions and anticipated results.

Companies that have an integrated business management process use the S&OP process to monitor the execution of their strategies.

Topic preview:

  • Establishing production plans
  • How S&OP help improve business
  • How to manage forecasts
  • The critical nature of S&OP and customer service
  • Resource planning to meet demand requirements
  • S&OP and strategic issues
  • How to optimize S&OP based with organizational constraints

Participants learn:

  • Create forecasts for demand management
  • Develop S&OP plans
  • Use resource planning to validate S&OP
  • Establish performance metrics
  • Initiate corrective actions
  • Disaggregate S&OP from the master schedule
  • Develop teamwork to achieve S&OP objectives
Transportation and Warehouse Management 

Transportation is the movement of goods from one location to another. Modes of transport include air, rail, road, water, cable, pipeline and space. The field can be divided into infrastructure, vehicle and operations. Transportation infrastructure consists of the fixed installations necessary for transport, including roads, railway, airway, waterways, canals and pipelines and terminals such as airports, railway stations, bus stations, warehousing, trucking terminals, refueling depots (including fueling docks and fuel stations) and seaports. Terminals may be used both for the interchange of passengers and cargo and for maintenance.

Warehouse management involves the receipt, storage and movement of goods (normally finished goods) to intermediate storage locations or a final customer. In the multi-echelon model for distribution there may be multiple levels of warehouses. This includes a central warehouse,  regional warehouses (serviced by the central warehouse) and potentially retail warehouses (serviced by the regional warehouses). Warehouse design and process design within the warehouse (e.g. wave picking) is also part of warehouse management.

Topic preview:

  • Why supply chain management?
  • The supply chain and financial performance
  • Deploying the supply chain
  • Supply performance measurement
  • Selected SCM tools
  • Efficient customer response
  • Collaborative management
  • SRM (supplier relationship management)

 

Participants learn:

  • The fundamental concepts of supply chain management
  • The basic design of a supply chain
  • To understand how supply chain operations affect financial statements
  • How best in class companies outperform the competition
  • Gain an understanding selected tools used in supply chain management
  • How to use metrics in managing supply chain performance
  • An awareness of the trends in supply chain management
Reducing and Mitigating Variability in Supply Chain

Variability is the dominant cause of mismatches between supply and demand, from daily inflections in demand to large-scale supply chain disruptions.

In this course, we examine the influence of variability throughout the supply chain, from its impact on simples processes to its effect on complex networks. We also discuss variability mitigation strategies designed to improve supply chain responsiveness and profitability.

The course material applies to a broad audience from executives to tactical-level employees. Both manufacturing and service industries employees will benefit from the topics covered.

Topic preview:

  • Understanding the impact of variability
  • Supply chain performance evaluation
  • Influence of variability on supply chain performance
  • Variability reeducation and mitigation of supply variances
  • Variability reduction strategies
  • Variability buffering
  • Variability pooling

Participants learn:

  • The relationship among the key supply chain performance measures
  • The impact of variability on WIP, decreasing flow rate and decreasing flow time
  • Why high utilization intensifies the effects on variability
  • Strategies to reduce processing time and input variability
  • Tactics to buffer against variability via inventor, capacity and time
  • Why variability pooling can decrease the amount of buffering required to achieve a given level of performance

 

Global Supply Chain Management Certificate 

SLU’s Global Supply Chain Management Certificate prepares individuals for positions as managers, directors and integral leaders within corporate supply chains. Students emerge with strengthened leadership abilities in the areas of strategic and operational alignment, global business practices and the overall execution, control and oversight needed to build a competitive global infrastructure. The certificate program is offered in the spring and includes the following courses.

Sign up for a single course

Business Analytics

Business analytics is the art of analyzing business data for decision-making. In the context of supply chain management, business analytics is about combining supply chain related data and solve specific SCM problems. An example of such problem is finalizing a location of a new distribution center by analyzing the variables: city population, cost of living, proximity to suppliers, customers, ports and airports.

This course provides a foundation for analytical concepts, techniques and tools required for supply-chain decision-making. Participants learn the basic concepts of analytics and acquire necessary skills for developing business dashboards. They also get hands-on exposure to business analytics software and create visualizations to solve specific SCM problems.

Topic preview:

  • Importance of analytics in supply chain management
  • Key database and statistical concepts related to analytics
  • Developing supply chain metrics
  • Business dashboard design
  • Supply chain based decision making with current analytics tools

Participants learn:

  • Develop supply chain metrics for analysis
  • Combine different dashboard components such as containers, maps, and charts
  • Use supply chain metrics to develop business dashboards
  • Analyze supply chain dashboards for decision-making
Global Trade Management Compliance

International Trade is the exchange of capital goods and services across international borders or territories. In most countries, such trade represents a significant share of gross domestic product (GDP). While global trade has been present throughout much of history, the economic, social and political importance has increased. Industrialization, advanced transportation, globalization, multinational corporations, and outsourcing are all having a major impact on the international trade system.

Trade compliance and conformance with international law has become more complex. The multiple points of failure across a global supply chain that a compliance-related issue can bring can negatively affect a company's reputation.

Topic preview:

  • An overview of trade compliance
  • Key FCPA and other compliance regulations
  • Compliance and security strategies
  • Key U.S. agencies that control exports
  • INCO terms and recent changes
  • Export compliance
  • Import compliance
  • Resources for compliance assistance and information


Participants learn:

  • Importance of trade compliance
  • Legal and regulatory requirements
  • The need for record keepying
  • Export guidelines and documentation
  • Import guidelines and documentation
  • FCPA - in depth
  • Technology and other systems to enable import/export activies
Global Legal Trade Environment

International trade is the exchange of capital, goods and services across international borders or territories. In most countries, such trade represents a significant share of the gross domestic product. While international trade has been present throughout much of history, the economic, social and political importance has increased. Industrialization, advanced transportation, globalization, multinational corporations, and outsourcing are all having a major impact on the international trade system.

Topic preview:

  • An overview of trade compliance
  • Key FCPA and other compliance regulations
  • Compliance and security strategies
  • Key U.S. agencies that control exports
  • INCO terms and recent changes
  • Export compliance
  • Import compliance
  • Resources for compliance assistance and information
Global Supply Chain Security

Supply chain security refers to efforts to enhance the security of the supply chain, the transport and logistics system for the world’s cargo. It combines traditional practices of supply chain management with the security requirements driven by threats such as terrorism, piracy and theft. Guaranteeing acceptable conditions in a global supply chain can be a complex challenge. As part of their efforts to demonstrate ethical practices, many large companies and global brands are integrating codes of conduct and guidelines into their corporate cultures and management systems. Through these, corporations are making demands on their suppliers (facilities, farms, subcontracted services such as cleaning, canteen, security, etc.) and verifying, through social audits, that they are complying with the required standard.

Topic preview:

  • Risk and rewards of global security participation
  • The role of the World Trade Organization and U.S. regulation
  • Key global security programs
  • Organizational preparedness
  • Domestic and foreign site validation
  • Security practices and compliance
  • Importance of senior management endorsement
  • Best practices for program certification
Project Management

Project management knowledge, skills and tools provide the processes and mechanisms for effectively implementing change in the complex supply chain management environment.

The need for effective project management techniques continues to grow as supply chain managers face challenges created by the geographical distribution of systems, the outsourcing of development and maintenance activities and the increased reliance on enterprise system software.

This two-day workshop provides a basic introduction to the various concepts and techniques of project management in enough detail to be immediately useful in the working environment.

Project management is an expansive domain that merits continued and extensive study. This workshops focuses on the project management concepts and techniques needed from the early stages of the project through execution.

Participants learn to:

  • Identify supply chain project managers in the St. Louis area
  • Identify the project management life cycle for a supply chain project
  • Understand Variances in supply chain “organizational” structures to support projects
  • Use methods to clarify the project scope, business objective, project objective and stakeholder analysis
  • Identify and articulate project assumptions and constraints.
  • How to consider process integration in project scope and definition
    Prepare a project communication plan that acknowledges the supply chain project network
  • Assess resource requirements and approach assigning resources.
    Identify and plan for risk (including socio-cultural risk)
Risk Management 

Risk management is the identification, assessment and prioritization of risks followed by coordinated and economical application of resources to minimize, monitor and control the probability or impact of unfortunate events or to maximize the realization of opportunities.

Risks can come from uncertainty in financial markets, project failures (at any phase in design, development, production or sustainment life-cycles), legal liabilities, credit risk, accidents, natural causes and disasters. The strategies to manage risk typically include transferring the risk to another party, avoiding the risk, reducing the negative effect or probability of the risk, or even accepting some or all of the potential or actual consequences of a particular risk.

Topic preview:

  • Perspectives in supply chain risk
  • Supply chain risk domains and methods
  • Risks related to strategic control chain
  • Technology risks
  • Supply chain structure and incentive alignment
  • Boheedrop’s supply chain risk matrix
  • Organizing for supply chain risk
  • What is at the heart of supply chain risk?
Supply Chain Trade Operations

Explore the variety of regulations, procedures, financial tools, and documents that are necessary to successfully trade goods from one region of the globe to another. Topics will include market risk analysis, transaction process flow, tools such as credit insurance, internet-based bank documentation, and services and resources provided by national and international organizations. Frequent guest speakers will share their experience and advice in conducting business globally, with an emphasis on the challenges faced within emerging markets.

With improvements in transportation and communication, international business grew rapidly after the beginning of the 20th century. International business includes all commercial transactions (that take place between two or more regions, countries and nations beyond their political boundary. Such international diversification is tied with firm performance and innovation.

Topic preview:

  • Strategic or not?
  • Components of global operations
  • The global trade process
  • Developing the scope of global trade operations
  • Organizational alignment
  • Managing global trade
  • Global trade and compliance and the performance continuum
  • Global trade policy

 Participants learn:

  • An understanding of global trade management
  • How the process affects business performance
  • The role of 3PL and other service providers in international trade
  • The best process to ensure organizational alignment
  • Key regulatory and compliance issues
  • Best practices in global trade
Transportation and Warehouse Management 

Transportation is the movement of goods from one location to another. Modes of transport include air, rail, road, water, cable, pipeline and space. The field can be divided into infrastructure, vehicle and operations. Transportation infrastructure consists of the fixed installations necessary for transport, including roads, railway, airway, waterways, canals and pipelines and terminals such as airports, railway stations, bus stations, warehousing, trucking terminals, refueling depots (including fueling docks and fuel stations) and seaports. Terminals may be used both for the interchange of passengers and cargo and for maintenance.

Warehouse management involves the receipt, storage and movement of goods (normally finished goods) to intermediate storage locations or a final customer. In the multi-echelon model for distribution there may be multiple levels of warehouses. This includes a central warehouse,  regional warehouses (serviced by the central warehouse) and potentially retail warehouses (serviced by the regional warehouses). Warehouse design and process design within the warehouse (e.g. wave picking) is also part of warehouse management.

Topic preview:

  • Why supply chain management?
  • The supply chain and financial performance
  • Deploying the supply chain
  • Supply performance measurement
  • Selected SCM tools
  • Efficient customer response
  • Collaborative management
  • SRM (supplier relationship management)

Participants learn:

  • The fundamental concepts of supply chain management
  • The basic design of a supply chain
  • To understand how supply chain operations affect financial statements
  • How best in class companies outperform the competition
  • Gain an understanding selected tools used in supply chain management
  • How to use metrics in managing supply chain performance
  • An awareness of the trends in supply chain management