Saint Louis University


Dr. James Ginther, Ph.D.


                          


 

I've working in digital humanities since 1999 when I began the Electronic Grosseteste Project. Since coming to SLU I've managed four more major projects, from 3DRT models of historic sites to digital corpora to a digital critical edition. The Center's last completed project, T-PEN, fulfilled a long dream of mine: to create effective digital tools that support the arduous task of editing unpublished texts. T-PEN has become the foundational tool and we will spent the next few years working on other editing tools.

My training as a medievalist and historical theologian (my PhD is from the Center for Medieval Studies, Toronto) has disposed me to collaborative and interdisciplinary work. I strongly believe that the more we work together as scholars and students, the better work we will produce. That collaborative spirit has infected the design and development of tools I have overseen. The other influence is a conviction that the power of digital humanities can be realized by aligning digital tools with existing practices and scholarly methods. I am in great admiration of those in this field who are on the vanguard with new approaches. My bailiwick, however, is to bring up the rearguard of scholars who are somewhat hesitant to enter the domain of digital humanities. I want the Center for Digital Theology to create tools and resources that will demonstrate the benefits of the digital world, especially the potential of wide-scale collaboration.

In addition to grant writing and management of the Center, I continue my research in the history of medieval theology and especially the life and works of Robert Grosseteste. I am currently completing a critical edition of Grosseteste's commentary on the Psalms, the last unedited work from his time as a university theologian at Oxford. 

 

 

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