Grapher Applets in 3D

A collection of applets for graphing in 3D

The standard way to graph surfaces in 3D is in Cartesian coordinates.  In that case we typically z as a function of x and y. The 3D Cartesian Grapher applet asks for an xWindow, a yWindow, and a zWindow to give a viewing window. The user may define two functions f and g to graph.  The user can scroll x0 and y0 through the range for x and y.  The grapher gives the surface along with a point corresponding to the graph of (x0,y0) and curves through that point with one variable held constant.

The second way to graph in 3D is with cylindrical coordinates.  We typically think of r as a function of theta and z.  The Cylindrical  Grapher applet asks for a maximum value for r and for a zWindow to give a viewing window.  The user may define two functions r1 and r2 to graph.  The user can scroll theta0 and z0 through the range for theta and z.  The grapher gives the surface along with a point corresponding to the graph of (theta0,z0) and curves through that point with one variable held constant.

The third way to graph in 3D is with spherical coordinates.  We typically think of r as a function of theta and phi, where theta is the familiar angle in the x-y plane from polar coordinates and phi is the angle from the north pole.  The Spherical  Grapher applet asks for a maximum value for r to give a viewing window.  The user may define two functions r1 and r2 to graph.  The user can scroll theta0 and phi0 through the range for theta and phi.  The grapher gives the surface along with a point corresponding to the graph of (theta0,phi0) and curves through that point with one variable held constant. 



This applet was designed as by modifying an applet from a demo by Tom Banchoff at Brown University.  It is used with permission.   Go to the Banchoff Applet Help page.

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Return to the SLU Calculus Applet page.

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Last updated By Mike May, S.J. ,  October 6, 2006.