Saint Louis University

Interested in Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation?

 

We are currently seeking students to be considered for the 2013-14 Intergroup Dialogue peer facilitator cohort. Intergroup dialogue utilizes undergraduate students who are trained as peer facilitators to lead weekly discussions over the course of a semester that explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences at both the interpersonal and the social/community levels.

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Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation FAQs

What is intergroup dialogue?
Who can be a facilitator? 
What is the expected time commitment?
What is the Training Timeline?
What skills are students expected to gain as facilitators?
Where can my intergroup dialogue experience be applied?
Is there compensation or incentives involved?


What is intergroup dialogue?

Intergroup dialogue utilizes undergraduate students who are trained as peer facilitators to lead weekly discussions over the course of a semester that explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences at both the interpersonal and the social/community levels. The Intergroup Dialogue (IGD) Program is a collaborative cross-division initiative between the College of Arts and Sciences and the Division of Student Development that offers social identity-based (e.g. race/ethnicity, gender, religion/faith) courses for credit to undergraduate students. 

Who can be a facilitator?

There are no required prerequisites for facilitation, although it helps to have taken an intergroup dialogue course prior to beginning facilitation training to have some experience with dialogic communication and social justice education theory. Individuals being considering for facilitation should exhibit a responsibility and commitment to the pursuit of inclusion and social justice, and a desire to learn, teach, and grow with others. Sophomores, juniors and seniors will be considered, and sophomore students in particular are strongly encouraged to apply.

What is the expected time commitment?

We are asking students for a two-semester commitment, first for training and second for actual facilitating. Facilitation is demanding, creative, and extraordinary!  Students admitted to the training are expected to attend all training sessions, including a weekend retreat. If training is successfully completed, students will be offered the opportunity to co-facilitate intergroup dialogue the following semester. Approximately 25 hours of training are involved.

Facilitation requires at least 10 hours per week as co-facilitators are able to tailor many sessions to the group's needs and interests.  Selecting readings, designing activities, and debriefing occur in conjunction with on-going facilitator training and team development. The group work is intense and supportive. Therefore, we ask that you apply only if you feel that you can COMMIT fully to this role and to your cohort of co-facilitators. 

What is the Training Timeline?

Training provides students with a conceptual, theoretical, and empirical knowledge base related to difference, dominance, social justice, and empowerment. Facilitators are also trained in communication, group building, conflict surfacing and de-escalation, and social justice education. Training begins with a full day retreat on Saturday, September 21, 2013. In addition, students are expected to attend four training sessions from 6p-8pm on:

  • Monday,  September 23
  • Monday, September 30
  • Monday, October 7
  • Monday, October 14

Students are required to attend all training sessions in order to be eligible to facilitate any future dialogue courses.

What skills are students expected to gain as facilitators?

Through the training and facilitating, students will develop valuable life skills not only in facilitation, but in intergroup communication, group dynamics, and teamwork. Some include:

  • Exploration of conceptual and theoretical social justice models
  • Group facilitation skills
  • Conflict management/mediation skills
  • Active listening skills
  • Effective communication with those different from self
  • Group management of diverse groups

Where can my intergroup dialogue experience be applied?

The facilitator position is a great leadership opportunity! Becoming a facilitator has the potential to increase and enhance a student’s university experience and beyond. These skill sets are emerging as high priority from potential employers. Facilitation and dialogue skills can be applied in:

  • Any meeting or group setting,
  • Mentorship programs,
  • Leadership development programs,
  • Student Orientation Leaders,
  • Resident Advisors,
  • Student Government Association Leaders,
  • Counseling settings,
  • Educational settings,
  • Other organizational settings,
  • Community settings,
  • And more… 

Is there compensation or incentives involved?

Upon completing training, students have the option of receiving course credit for facilitation, and also receive up to $300 in Billiken Bucks for their service to the program.


 

Click here for the Link to the 2013 Intergroup Dialogue Facilitator Application

 

Questions regarding applications and the selection process should be directed to Patrice French, Program Coordinator of Multicultural Education, by email at pfrench4@slu.edu, by phone, 314-977-2826, or in person at the Cross Cultural Center, Suite 134 in the Center for Global Citizenship. 

Application Deadline is August 30, 2013

 

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