Saint Louis University

Department of Communication Faculty

    
Amber Johnson
Assistant Professor
OFFICE HOURS, XH 329
Tuesday: 12-2pm
Thursday: 12-2pm
by appointment
CONTACT
e: ajohns37@slu.edu
p: 314-977-2921
f: 314-977-3195
a: Xavier Hall, 329
3733 West Pine Mall
St. Louis, MO 63108
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EDUCATION

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Department of Communication Arts and Sciences

HONORS & AWARDS

Best Article of the Year Award, National Communication Association, Ethnography Division, 2015

Johnson, A. (2014). Confessions of a Video Vixen: My Autocritography of Sexuality, Desire, and Memory. Text and Performance Quarterly, 34(2), 182-200.

Golden Anniversary Monograph Award, National Communication Association, 2014

Johnson, A. (2014). Confessions of a Video Vixen: My Autocritography of Sexuality, Desire, and Memory. Text and Performance Quarterly, 34(2), 182-200.

Outstanding Book Chapter, African American Communication & Culture Division, National Communication Association, 2014

Johnson, A. (2013). Negotiating More, (Mis)Labeling the Body: A Tale of Intersectionality. In R. Boylorn & M. Orbe Critical Autoethnography: Intersecting Cultural Identities in Everyday Life. CA: Left Coast Press.

HBCU Female Faculty of the Year Award, 2015

The Outstanding Faculty Award recognizes a faculty member who excels in teaching, research and service at an Historically Black College or University.

RESEARCH INTERESTS AND ACTIVITIES

Amber Johnson merges qualitative and rhetorical methods with a focus on digital narratives. She studies "messy" intersections of sexuality, race, class, geography, education, religion, and beauty. Dr. Johnson is an award winning author and has published articles in Critical Studies in Media and Communication, Text and Performance Quarterly, Communication Quarterly, Howard Journal of Communication, Qualitative Inquiry, Departures in Critical Qualitative Research and Health Communication Journal.

PUBLICATIONS

Johnson, A. (2016). The Face of Civility: Engaging Critical Pedagogy through Hypermodality. Qualitative Inquiry.

Johnson, A. (2016). The Face of Civility: Engaging Critical Pedagogy through Hypermodality. Qualitative Inquiry.

Johnson, A. (2015). Digital media, sex, and performance: An introduction. Liminalities: A Journal of Performance Studies, 11(1).

Johnson, A., & Boylorn, R. (2015). Starving for Representation Between Women: Performative Possibilities of Black Sexuality in Digital Media. Liminalities: A Journal of Performance Studies, 11(1).

Cooke-Jackson, A., Orbe, M., Johnson, A., Kauffman, L.(2015). Abstinence memorable message narratives: A new exploratory research study into young adult sexual narratives. Health Communication, 10.1080/10410236.2014.924045.

Johnson, A. (2014). Concrete and Dust: A Performative Review. Liminalities: A Journal of Performance Studies, 10(3.4).

Orbe, M., Johnson, A. L., Kauffman, L. D., & Cooke-Jackson, A. F. (2014). Memorable first time sexual experiences: Gendered patterns and nuances. Communication Quarterly, 62(3), 285-307.

Johnson, A. (2014). Doing It: A Rhetorical Autoethnography Religious Masturbation and Identity Negotiation. Departures in Critical Qualitative Research, 3(4) 366-388.

Johnson, A., Orbe, M. & Cook-Jackson, A. (2014). "Let's Talk about Sex:" Exploring memorable messages of students at a U.S. Historically Black College/University. Howard Journal of Communication, 25(3), 303-323.

Johnson, A. (2014). Confessions of a Video Vixen: My Autocritography of Sexuality, Desire, and Memory. Text and Performance Quarterly, 34(2), 182-200.

Kauffman, L., Orbe, M., Johnson, A., & Cooke-Jackson, A. (2013). Memorable familial messages about sex: A qualitative content analysis of college student narratives. Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality, 16.

Johnson, A. (2013). Antoine Dodson and the (Mis)Appropriation of the Homo Coon: An Intersectional Approach to the Performative Possibilities of Social Media. Critical Studies in Media and Communication, 30(2), 152-170.

 

The opinions expressed by Communication Department faculty on these pages do not necessarily represent the views of Saint Louis University or its administration. 

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