Saint Louis University
Matt Carlson

Associate Professor
Department of Communication

fleur-de-lis
courses taught: CMM 100, CMM 206, CMM 280, CMM 384, CMM 443, CMM 510, CMM 512
email: mcarls10@slu.edu
phone: 314-977-3344
fax: 314-977-3195
address: Xavier Hall, 310
3733 West Pine Mall
St. Louis , MO   63108
maps: Campus Map | Google Map
office hours: Tue 3-4 ; Wed 2-3
links:
drmattcarlson.wordpress.com


Member of the
SLU community
since 2007
Degree: Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
2007
Degree: M.A.C.
University of Pennsylvania
2002
Professional 
experience:
Researcher, 2002-2004, Project for Excellence in Journalism
Publications:

Carlson, Matt (2015). When News Sites Go Native: Redefining the Advertising-Editorial Divide in Response to Native Advertising. Journalism, forthcoming.

Carlson, Matt (2015) The Robotic Reporter: Automated Journalism and the Redefinition of Labor, Compositional Forms, and Journalistic Authority. Digital Journalism, forthcoming.

Carlson, Matt & Peifer, Jason (2013) The Impudence of Being Earnest: Jon Stewart and the Boundaries of Discursive Responsibility. Journal of Communication, 63(2), 333-350.

Presentations 
and Speaking 
Engagements:
“What’s All the Fuss About? Metajournalistic Discourse as Methodological Intervention in a Time of Media Upheaval” Qualitative Political Communication Research pre-conference, International Communication Association, Seattle, May 2014 “Telling the Crisis at the New York Times: The Page One Documentary and Journalistic Authority” Social Trends Institute, Barcelona, Spain, May 2014 “On Platitudes and Public Attitudes: Connecting Metajournalistic Discourse, Boundary Work, and journalistic Authority” Rethinking Journalism II: The Societal Role & Relevance of Journalism in a Digital Age, Groningen, Netherlands, January 2014.
Research 
Interests:
Journalism studies / Media studies / Cultural studies
Narrative: My work employs a cultural perspective to assess journalism within a changing media and cultural landscape in which basic notions of journalistic authority, identity, and professionalism have come to be questioned and challenged. Other research explores tensions between old and new media forms, the development of new media technology, and the role of collective memory among interpretive communities.
Service:
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