Saint Louis University

Masters in World History

World History Graduate Program
The discipline of world history has emerged in recent years as one of the most important and innovative fields of historical scholarship. Historians from various areas of specialization have gone beyond traditional borders to examine trans-regional developments that affected contemporary societies and that shaped the modern world. This scholarship has focused on such units of analysis as migration streams, diasporas, empire-building, colonialism, epidemiological patterns, climatic and environmental changes, long-distance trade, and religious proselytizing. The effects of these global phenomena have become tangible as scholars have connected them to local peoples in their nations, cities, villages, tribes, and families. Thus, the reciprocity between global processes and local affairs illustrate the unfolding human condition in specific historical moments. Greater attention to the local effects of global interactions has prompted a wide range of scholars to examine the interconnections between peoples in past times to understand the interdependencies in the world today.

The History Department offers advanced historical training for professional participation in global affairs. History as a discipline aims to analyze geopolitics, labor regimes, environments, societies, cultures, and gender constructions. As a Department, we work to help graduate students in World History to understand the interplay of these units over time, as we attempt to integrate local developments in international settings. The combined expertise and interest in world history among many faculty provide the opportunity to push students to think comparatively and connectedly, and in terms of themes that span geographically dispersed areas of world-trade, migration, disease, religion, state formation, colonialism, and post-colonialism.

The overarching aim of the M.A. in World History is to train graduate students in the methodologies of the discipline, expose them to a broad spectrum of topics in comparative and connected history, and enable them to carry out in-depth research based on primary and secondary sources.


Professor Torrie Hester: Migration in U.S. History, Globalization and the Pacific Rim, Global Systems and Capitalism.
Professor Thomas Madden: The Crusades.
Professor Filippo Marsili: Silk Roads, Central Asian Nomadic Empires, China, Japan and the
West since 1600; Missionaries in Central Asia, China, and Japan; Comparative Approaches to Religious Practices and Institutions, Gender, and Political Ethics.
Professor Nathaniel Millett: Atlantic World; Slavery in the Atlantic World; Native American
History; Borderlands; Comparative Revolutions; Comparative Empires.
Professor George Ndege: Medicine and Disease in Cross-Cultural Perspective; African
Professor Charles Parker: Early Modern Empires; Disease in the Early Modern World; Comparative Missionary Encounters (Christian, Muslim, Buddhist).
Professor Michal Rozbicki: Intercultural Relations.
Professor Damian Smith: Christian-Muslim Interaction; Mediterranean as a Cultural
Professor Luke Yarbrough: The Middle East and the World since Antiquity; Inclusion and
Exclusion in Comparative Perspective; Islamic Empires.

Associated Programs
Center for Global Citizenship
Center for Intercultural Studies
Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

The St. Louis Room and Vatican Film Library at Pius Memorial Library offers a very rich collection that pertains to religion, ethnography, and intellectual exchange from the Middle Ages through the Nineteenth Century. The library also subscribes to substantial databases, such as ECCO (Eighteenth Century Collections Online) and EEBO (Early English Books) relevant to research on world history.

More Information
For more information see the Department of History's Graduate Studies page or contact one of our faculty members directly. To apply please visit the Graduate Education website.

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