Saint Louis University

Nathan Grant, Ph.D.



Associate Professor

Adorjan 317



Nathan Grant received his doctorate from New York University in New York City. Before becoming faculty at SLU, he was an associate professor at SUNY/Buffalo. His interests include African American literature and cultural studies, and he has also written on theater, film, and television. He has also joined SLU as the editor of African American Review.




M.A. New York University (1984)
Ph.D. New York University (1994)




African American literature, culture and intellectual history; the Harlem Renaissance; African diasporic literature; cultural studies.


Masculinist Impulses: Toomer, Hurston, Black Writing and Modernity (University of Missouri Press, 2004).




"Owen Dodson: Poet, Fiction Writer, Playwright: A Special Section" (with previously unpublished poems of Dodson's, Nathan Grant, ed.), Callaloo 20:3 (1998), pp. 619-626.

"Extending the Ladder: A Remembrance of Owen Dodson," Callaloo 20:3, (1998), pp. 640-645.  


"Sacrifices of Self and Voice in Jean Toomer's 'Kabnis,'" Q/W/E/R/T/Y 7 (October 1997, Université de Pau, France), pp. 137-144.


"Men, Women and Culture: A Conversation with August Wilson," American Drama 5:2 (Spring 1996), pp. 100-122.


"Hughes/Lawrence/Douglass: Power and Resistance in The Ways of White Folks," Afro-Americans in New York Life and History 19:2 (Spring 1995), pp. 43-52.



"Intimate Knowledge and Transnational Contingencies: Julia Collins's The Curse of Caste and the Legend of the Lindaraja Mirador." New Essays on Julia Collins and The Curse of Caste, Veta P. Tucker, ed. (in progress).


"Teaching Jean Toomer's Cane." Teaching the Harlem Renaissance, Michael Soto, ed., Peter Lang, 2008, pp. 193-199.


"Mirror's Fade to Black: Masculinity, Misogyny and Class Ideation in The Cosby Show and Martin." Progressive Black Masculinities, Athena D. Mutua, ed., Routledge, 2006, pp. 177-189.


"Countee Cullen," in African American Writers, vol. 1, 2nd ed., Valerie A. Smith, gen. ed., Charles Scribner & Sons, 2001, pp. 135-147.


"Notes of a Prodigal Son: James Baldwin and the Apostasy of Soul." Soul: Black Power, Politics and Pleasure, Monique Guillory and Richard C. Green, eds., NYU Press, 1998, pp. 32-44.


"Innocence and Ambiguity in the Films of Charles Burnett." Representing Blackness: Issues in Film and Video, Valerie A. Smith, gen. ed., Rutgers University Press, 1997, pp. 135-155.


"The Frustrated Project of Soul in the Drama of Ed Bullins." Language, Rhythm, and Sound: Black Popular Cultures toward the Twenty-first Century, Joseph Adjaye and Adrianne Andrews, eds., University of Pittsburgh Press, 1997, pp. 90-102.



"Black Fascisms: African American Literature and Culture between the Wars by Mark Christian Thompson." Modern Fiction Studies (in progress).


"Zora Neale Hurston and a History of Southern Life by Tiffany Ruby Patterson." African American Review 40:3 (Winter 2007), 593-595.


"Tough Notes: A Healing Call for Creating Exceptional Black Men by Haki R. Madhubuti" and "Constructing the Black Masculine by Maurice O. Wallace." The Washington Post Book World, Wednesday, September 4, 2002, p. C11.


"Ed Bullins: A Literary Biography by Samuel A. Hay." African American Review 33:2 (Summer 1999), pp. 369-371.

"The Harlem Renaissance in Black and White by George Hutchinson." Afro-Americans in New York Life and History, 22:1 (Winter 1998), pp. 88-94.  

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