Saint Louis University

Director: Joe Weixlmann, Ph.D 



*Spring 2016 Courses

Master's Program | Doctoral Program | Student Involvement | Student Resources 

Our Graduate Program provides students scholarly training in English language and literature. Encountering courses that span the full experience of works in the English language--from Old Norse to Mark Twain and Gertrude Stein, and from Chaucer and Shakespeare to contemporary and post-colonial writing--students in the Program have the chance to pursue specializations in a great variety of literary fields and in the study of rhetoric and composition. Responsive to interdisciplinary interests and to all of the theoretical discourses that connect the study of English language and literature to other literatures and cultures, the Program is committed to equipping students with the disciplines and methods of linguistic and literary analysis that will prepare them professionally for the careers they seek.

Representatives in their training from some of the most distinguished research institutions, our faculty are also representative in their scholarship and teaching of the spectrum of interests that currently enliven the study of English. Our faculty are active in such interdisciplinary programs as Women's and Gender Studies and the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and we host several journals, including African American Review and Fugue.

No small part of the vitality of our Program, however, comes from our students who  bring a diversity of perspectives and interests to our graduate classes. Our program prospers most from the opportunities it affords for close interactions between students and faculty and among the students themselves.

Both our master's and doctoral students select their own examination advisors and have a prominent voice in shaping examination and thesis boards. Reinforcing the voice our students have in important elements of their program is the English Graduate Organization (EGO!), an active group that works with the faculty to promote the professionalization of graduate students through activities such as workshops on career preparation, trips to learned conferences, and on-campus symposia.