Saint Louis University

SLUCare Infectious Disease specialists are renowned physicians, educators and researchers, fighting illnesses on three fronts: in our outpatient clinic, in hospitals and in the research lab. Our work with infectious diseases is nationally recognized, and our care is second to none.

SLUCare Infectious Diseases Clinic
Formerly known as the New Hope Clinic, the SLUCare Infectious Diseases Clinic offers diagnosis, treatment and management of complex conditions, such as HIV/AIDS, MRSA and tuberculosis (TB). We also see patients after a hospitalization for ongoing care of complex or unusual infections. The clinic director is Dr. Marcia Sokol-Anderson, recognized by her peers as one of the Best Doctors in America.

Inpatient Hospital Care
SLUCare Infectious Disease specialists provide infection control at Saint Louis University Hospital and at SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center. We diagnose, treat and manage infections for hospitalized patients, both through direct patient care and through collaboration with the attending physician. We also work to prevent hospital infections through proactive initiatives, such as our antibiotic stewardship program, to minimize risks for patients in our care.

National Leaders in Vaccine Development
Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development is one of nine research centers in the U.S. recognized by the National Institutes of Health as a Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU). VTEUs study infectious diseases, develop new or improved vaccines to protect the public, and provide rapid-response capability in the event of a public health crisis.

Our infectious disease specialists are part of this elite group, at the forefront of vaccine development for:

  • Biodefense
  • Emerging infectious diseases, such as bird flu
  • Respiratory viral diseases and influenza, such as H1N1
  • Other viral, bacterial and parasitic infections

Successes and Ongoing Trials
Infectious disease researchers at SLU proved the efficacy of nasal spray flu vaccine for children in the 1990s and quickly prepared flu vaccines for the nation in the face of an H1N1 pandemic in 2009. They've worked on vaccines for influenza, tuberculosis, smallpox, HIV and AIDS; RSV; hepatitis A, B and C; Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib); dengue; and pertussis (whooping cough).

Clinical trials are an important part of this research. Learn more about what it means to participate in a clinical trial and how you can become a volunteer.


SLUCare Infectious Diseases Locations

Infectious Diseases Clinic [map]
Drummond Hall
3691 Rutger St., Suite 100
St. Louis, MO 63110
(314) 977-9050


Center for Vaccine Development [map]
Edward A. Doisy Research Center
1100 S. Grand Blvd., 1st Floor
St. Louis, MO 63104
(314) 977-6333