Dr. Yeung

Endometriosis is a condition where endometrial tissue is found outside the uterus, most often in the pelvic region and even over the bowel and bladder. In addition to discomfort, endometriosis can lead to chronic pelvic pain and even infertility.

The SLUCare Center for Endometriosis offers a multidisciplinary team approach to your care. General surgeons and specialists in pain management, physical therapy and fertility design your individualized treatment plan.

The goal of surgery is the complete removal of all visible endometriosis. This approach has been shown to have the potential to eradicate disease and prevent progression when performed by an experienced surgeon, such as SLUCare's Dr. Patrick Yeung, Jr., director of the SLUCare Center for Endometriosis.

Dr. Yeung has been recognized by the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists Center of Excellence in Minimally Invasive Gynecology.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Endometriosis

Surgery to treat endometriosis is performed at the the SLUCare Center for Endometriosis through a minimally invasive technique called laparoscopy, which leads to less postoperative pain, faster recovery and better cosmetic results.

"See and treat" laparoscopy is performed, so that all the endometriosis is diagnosed and treated during the same procedure, when possible. At the SLUCare Center for Endometriosis, we also employ various techniques to prevent postoperative adhesions or scarring, which can itself cause pain and negatively affect your fertility.

Dr. Yeung has answered some frequently asked questions about endometriosis.

SLUCare Center for Endometriosis Locations

Women's Health Pavilion at SSM Health St. Mary's Hospital - St. Louis
1031 Bellevue Ave., Suite 400
St. Louis, MO 63117
(314) 977-7455

SLUCare Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health at St. Luke's Hospital
224 S. Woods Mill Road, Suite 665
St. Louis, MO 63017
(314) 977-7455

Email us at centerforendo@slu.edu

Research Trials

At the SLUCare Center for Endometriosis, recent published studies have shown the potential of complete excision in experienced hands (even without postoperative long term hormonal suppression) to eradicate disease even in teenagers, a traditionally very difficult population to treat for endometriosis. Ongoing landmark trials are also being performed to further evaluate the value and curative potential of excision in the treatment of endometriosis. Such research benefits patients by offering patients access to the most cutting edge technology and treatments.