Saint Louis University

Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

OCS 312- The study of Occupation (3)

This course defines and explores the concept of occupation and its related constructs. Meanings of occupation are derived by several methods. First, the student will explore the history of occupation and occupational science as a new academic discipline. Second, theories and classification systems currently used to frame discussions of occupation and its component elements will be examined from the perspectives of occupational science, which is studied across many disciplines. Finally, the core belief of occupational science will be introduced. This belief is that occupation, as the means by which humans construct a personal identity and create life meaning, has the potential power to directly affect the health of individuals, communities, countries, and even the world.

OCS 322 Contexts of Occupation (3)
This course introduces the student to the concept of "context" and its relationship to person and occupation. Physical, temporal, cultural, personal, virtual, political and economic contexts will be explored with regard to their effect on participation in occupation. The influence of healthy vs. unhealthy contexts as well as issues of occupational risk, access, generational influence and contextual interdependence will be examined. Contexts will be discussed with regard to how they can influence change in the community through participation in an applied community service learning experience.

OCS 332-Across Lifespan Development of Occupation (3)
This course explores the emergence of humans as occupational beings in evolutionary and developmental terms. Human biological, psychological, and sociological needs and drives for occupation relative to major life performance areas (experiences) of play/leisure/work/life transitions will be examined. Additionally, the link between being an occupational being and identity; the use of occupation to structure and adapt to life circumstances; and the relation of occupation with health and well-being will be examined.

OCS 352-Occupational Health & Wellness (3)
This course presents an overview of health and wellness from occupational, community, public health, medical and quality of life perspectives across the lifespan. Building on the foundations established in earlier occupational science coursework, this course presents a framework for understanding the relationship of typical occupational patterns, health and wellness starting from a personal viewpoint and extending into the community. Students will personally experience and gain awareness of their own wellness and processes of change or maintenance. Classroom and applied experiences will also emphasize the learner's self- awareness of health beliefs, practices and lifestyle choices. Finally, students will begin to understand how occupation can be utilized to facilitate optimal levels of health and well-being.

OCS 362-Lived Experience of Disability & Chronic Conditions (3)
This course facilitates students' understanding of and empathy with the thoughts, emotions, and experiences of a variety of people who have disabilities or chronic illnesses, and who live in a wide range of physical and cultural surroundings. Lectures and discussions will provide a venue for exploring the impact of culture, society, and public policy on the lived experience and occupational choices of individuals and their families. Discussions, exercises and written assignments will facilitate students' self-awareness, integration of new ideas, and personal development. The "lived experience" will be considered at multiple levels: the individual, the family unit, and the larger community.

OCS 372-Occupation in Diverse Communities (3)
Using St. Louis as a microcosm of global society and work as an example of global occupation, this course extends our knowledge of humans as occupational beings by introducing concepts of community, globalization, and marginalization, emphasizing diverse populations in the United States. A theme of occupational justice runs throughout the course as we critically analyze dominant American practices, international cultures, and our moral responsibility to understand "others" in a service role.

OCS 462 Clinical Conditions & Phenomenology (4)
This course will address how disability from traumatic or chronic illness disrupts occupational patterns and the role of occupational therapy in returning individuals to quality of life experiences.

 


 

Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)

MOT 500 Fundamentals of Occupational Science (1)
Foundational concepts underlying occupational science for post-baccalaureate master students. Theoretical perspectives that address the various themes and tenets of human occupation will be covered, along with the inception and evolution of the scholarly discipline of occupational science The impact of physical, economic, cultural and other aspects of context on the expression of human occupation will be explored

MOT 502 Professional Development Seminar I (1)
This seminar will introduce students to the necessary preparatory prerequisites for participation in Level II Fieldwork including progression policies and procedures. In addition to scheduled seminars students will meet in small groups and individually with the Fieldwork Coordinator.

MOT 503 Professional Development II (1)
This seminar will provide students with the necessary preparatory prerequisites for participation in level I fieldwork. This course will address evaluation of student performance during their level I fieldwork and student evaluation of level I fieldwork. Students will be introduced to the beginning process of level II fieldwork.

MOT 504 Professional Development III (1)
This seminar will provide students with the necessary preparatory prerequisites for participation in level I fieldwork. This course will address evaluation of student performance during their level I fieldwork and student evaluation of level I fieldwork. Students will be introduced to the beginning process of level II fieldwork.

MOT 515 Kinesiology (3)
Students learn biomechanical and occupation-based approaches across a range of musculoskeletal conditions. Assessment and intervention approaches are applied to congenital and acquired conditions encountered in person of middle age through older adulthood. Lab required.

MOT 517 Neuroscience in OT (4)
This course will address the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological bases of sensory perception, emotion, cognition and learning, and movement that are foundational to occupational performance. Disorders that effect the nervous system resulting in impaired functional ability will also be discussed, including management and evaluation techniques utilized by occupational therapy.
Prerequisites: Bio 110, Anat 100, Anat 400, Chem 153, PPY 254 (or their equivalent)

MOT 520 Clinical Conditions & Phenomenon (4)
This course will address how disability from traumatic or chronic illness disrupts occupational patterns and the role of occupational therapy in returning individuals to quality of life experiences.

MOT 525 OT Policy and Administration (2)
An introduction to the principles of management and organizational leadership, professional and personal development, and entrepreneurialism in traditional and non-traditional settings.

MOT 526 Problem-Based Learning (2)
This course involves a combination of weekly large group lecture-discussions and biweekly small group seminars. Small groups of students will work closely with a faculty facilitator in a problem-based learning approach to developing clinical reasoning, teamwork, and professional communication skills. Cases will allow participants to explore personal, environmental, occupational, and ethical issues through the life span, and to apply a variety of frames of reference to evaluation and intervention. Students will be encouraged to explore and evaluate their knowledge and attitudes relative to a variety of clinical, social, and policy issues. An emphasis on independent, lifelong learning and generating solutions to complex problems will be evident throughout the course. Full-group sessions will provide didactic and interactive experiences to promote professional communication, complete prerequisites for participation in level I and level II fieldwork, understand fieldwork progression policies and procedures, and understand the expectations of students for professional behaviors during fieldwork. Lab Required

MOT 530 Fundamentals of OT Practice (3)
This courses introduces the learned to fundamental, contemporary foundations of occupational therapy practice, with a continuous focus on meaningful occupation as both a means and a n outcome of therapy. The history of the profession and its evolution through a succession of paradigm shifts is explored. Professionalism within occupational therapy is emphasized including. The course includes an in-depth examination of the profession's ethical Standards of Practice, the domain and process of occupational therapy, and the therapeutic use of self. Basic skills in analyzing, selecting, modifying and using activities therapeutically are introduced and applied. Learners are introduced to the methods involved in comprehensive occupational analysis, assessment of occupational performance, and therapeutic occupation across practice areas. Lab required.

MOT 535 Theoretical Foundations of OT (3)
Students in this course will understand the nature and components of a scientific theory, and how theories relate to clinical application as frames of reference, and ways to evaluate the worth of any theory. A variety of theories that inform contemporary OT practice will be reviewed and applied through the beginning use of clinical reasoning. Students will understand the fundamental concepts and language of each theory reviewed, the population and practice settings typically addressed, examples of evaluation and intervention approaches supported by each theory, and example of research that has tested aspects of each theory.

MOT 540 OT in Rehabilitation (3)
Assessment, treatment planning and use of clinical reasoning to develop intervention strategies for clients. Premeditative, compensatory and adaptive approaches to psychosocial and physical dysfunction will be explored through case studies and community experiences. Lab required.

MOT 541 OT in Behavioral Health I: Theory, Evaluation and Treatment Planning (3)
This course includes a core self-reflection component designed to assist the student to achieve optimal therapeutic use of self, and to broaden their communication and interviewing skills, Assessment, treatment planning and use of clinical reasoning to develop intervention strategies for clients is introduced, with an emphasis upon a greater understanding of the psychosocial needs to be addressed with all clients. Development of occupational analysis skills will continue. Students will work in teams, with virtual clients through case studies, and will undertake community experiences. Lab required.

MOT 545 Occupational Performance and Assessment of Infants and Children (3)
From a developmental perspective, this course will address how environment, activities, tasks, and roles of a client are used as meaningful occupations in planning interventions. This course will address child/adolescent meaningful occupations. Lab required.

MOT 546 OT with Aging Adults (3)
This course addresses the role of occupational therapy with older adults throughout the continuum of care, with the emphasis upon service provision with those living in the community. Learning experiences include a range of applied primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions with elders and their families, including screening, assessment and intervention services. Lab required.

MOT 549 Applied Research Seminar - I (1)
This course introduces students to the research process within the occupational therapy profession. Students develop skills with searching and analyzing research literature, and apply evidence-based research concepts. An integrative approach in class is utilized to 1facilitate the discovery of research questions and approaches that relate directly to the needs of the OT academic and practice setting. . The emphasis for this semester is on qualitative methodology and students develop skills in collecting data via observation and interviewing techniques, and in data analysis. The option to complete a research project with faculty mentors is introduced and students who elect to engage in this process identify and initiate a research project with the faculty mentor.

MOT 550 Applied Research Seminar - II (1)
As the second course in the Applied Research Seminar series, this course continues to introduce the student to the importance of scholarly inquiry in occupational science and occupational therapy and, for those students opting to do the Masters Project, to support the ongoing development of that project. An integrative adult learner approach is used to develop critical reasoning skills and the ability to assess research perspectives in OS/OT and actively engage in application of research in the context of service learning. The focus of the course is on developing competencies in translating research into evidence-based practice. It is thus not so much on how to conduct research, as it is on how to use research in clinical/professional settings.


MOT 555 OT in Rehabilitation II (0-3)
Assessment, treatment planning and use of clinical reasoning to develop intervention strategies for adult client conditions. Compensatory and adaptive approaches to neurological and physical dysfunction will be explored through case studies and community experiences. Lab required.

MOT 556 OT in Behavioral Health II : Intervention and Group Skills (3)
Students continue to develop their skills with assessment, treatment planning and use of clinical reasoning to develop intervention strategies for adult client conditions. Compensatory and adaptive approaches to psychosocial and psychiatric dysfunction will be explored through case studies and community experiences. Lab work included in course.

MOT 560 OT with Infants and Children (4)
Assessment, treatment planning and use of clinical reasoning to develop intervention strategies for child/adolescent client conditions. Compensatory and adaptive approaches to psychosocial, psychiatric, and physical dysfunction will be explored through case studies and community experiences. Lab required.

MOT 565 Applied Research Seminar III (1-2)
Building upon the foundation established in the previous two Applied Research courses, this seminar course lays additional groundwork for an entry-level occupational therapy practitioner's appreciation of the role of scientific inquiry in the field. Those students with Masters Projects typically complete that process, which is related to their faculty mentor's scholarship.

MOT 566 Applied Research Seminar IV (1-3)
Additional time is provided via this seminar for those students whose Masters Projects require extension beyond the scope of the first three seminars.

MOT 570 Level II Fieldwork (6)
Building on the foundation established in the MOT courses, Level II Fieldwork provides students with the opportunity to integrate academic knowledge with application of skills in a practice setting. Further, Level II Fieldwork is designed to develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupational therapists.

MOT 575 Level II Fieldwork (6)
Building on the foundation established in the MOT courses, Level II Fieldwork provides students with the opportunity to integrate academic knowledge with application of skills in a practice setting. Further, Level II Fieldwork is designed to develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupational therapists.

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