Master of Arts (Non-Thesis)

The College of Philosophy and Letters partners with SLU’s Department of Philosophy to offer students a flexible program leading to a non-thesis master’s degree in philosophy.

Course requirements give you maximum flexibility in shaping your program of studies: you may take up to nine hours of undergraduate courses (at the 4000-level) and 12 hours outside philosophy.

Students may pursue graduate coursework for two years in the College of Philosophy and Letters before they transfer officially to the philosophy graduate program in the College of Arts and Sciences in their third year.

Candidates should have completed the GRE, as well as 18 credit hours of philosophy beyond the introductory level (such as courses equivalent to PHIL 1050).

Departmental Program Requirements

  • 30 credit hours
  • 18 hours of philosophy, with a minimum of 12 graduate philosophy hours
  • Minimum of 21 graduate hours
  • Completion of the capstone project
  • One-hour oral examination on the capstone paper

The student is responsible for assembling the examination board, which normally shall consist of three faculty members from the Department of Philosophy. With the approval of the capstone course instructor, the board may include up to two faculty members from other departments.

The oral examination satisfies the requirement of an oral philosophy examination for Jesuit students on the path to priestly ordination.

Course Requirements for Philosophy and Letters Students

Jesuits and other students in the M.A. program who are preparing for eventual ordination are required to fulfill additional course requirements. Specific course requirements may be adjusted, as determined by the student’s religious superior or bishop.

Requirements Credit hours
Epistemology 3
Philosophy of Religion 3
Philosophy of Human Nature 3
Ethics 3
Ancient Philosophy 3
Medieval Philosophy 3
Modern Philosophy 3
Contemporary Philosophy 3
Special Ethics/Social Analysis 9
Two-semester capstone process 4
 

Graduate-level philosophy courses may simultaneously satisfy M.A. requirements and the philosophy courses required of students on the path to ordination.

Requirements in the history of philosophy (ancient, medieval, modern, contemporary) may be satisfied by courses on specific philosophers and not simply by survey courses.