Urban Poverty Studies (Minor)

Saint Louis University's minor in urban poverty studies allows you to explore promising solutions to the most pressing problems faced by people living on the margins in American cities.

Saint Louis University’s urban poverty studies minor is administered through the Micah Program — a faith-based program that brings students together to seek long-term solutions to problems of the urban poor — but is available to students of all majors. 

The program combines coursework, hands-on learning in neighborhoods near the University and research.

The minor requires 18 hours of coursework and 120 hours of community service during your SLU career. Students must also complete a final capstone project.


Beginning with general courses on social justice and urban problems, the minor incorporates study of a particular issue followed by three courses in an area of specialization. The last of these is the senior capstone, a research project carried out under the guidance of a faculty mentor. 

Areas of specialization include cycles of exclusion, immigration and globalization, health care and theories of social justice. 

  • ASTD 2700: Women and Social Justice
  • PHIL 1050: Introduction to Philosophy: Self and Reality
  • THEO 1000: Theological Foundations
  • SOC 1500: The Urban Community: Race, Class and Spatial Justice
  • THEO 2515: Social Justice
  • THEO 3515: Poverty, Wealth and Justice

Courses in the urban poverty studies minor are taught by experts in such fields as American studies, African-American studies, English, Latino-American studies, philosophy, sociology, social work, theology, and women’s studies.

  • Donald Stump, Ph.D., Micah director