Saint Louis University

The process for becoming a member of the Public Law Review is open to all Saint Louis University School of Law students whether they are first-year, second-year, full-time, or part-time students who are ranked in the top 50% of their class. Members are selected through a blind-graded write-on competition administered after Spring finals in conjunction with the Saint Louis University Law Journal which tests candidates on their editing skills and legal writing ability. In addition, membership will also be extended to those students who are ranked in the top 10% of their class after the Spring semester based on 30 or more credit hours.

Generally, the write-on competition requires each participant to submit a casenote, which is a detailed analysis of a recent case and can be written to either support or criticize the court's holding, as well as a Bluebook exercise, which requires participants to correct footnotes based on the newest edition of the Bluebook. A good casenote is one that is persuasive and well supported. The substances as well as form and citations are critical to your casenote. When submitting to the Public Law Review, write-on competition submissions are graded anonymously by members of the Editorial Board, who are asked to read and score each paper. Their evaluation focuses on analysis, writing ability, and technical skills (including Bluebook and grammar).

During the first year on the Public Law Review, members are part of editing teams that substantively edit, bluebook, and proofread the content that goes into the Public Law Review. Members are also responsible for writing a Note or Comment for possible publication. During their second year, members either become senior editors that lead editing teams or serve as editorial board members, including the Notes and Comments Editor, Executive Editor, Managing Editors, and Editor-in-Chief.

The Public Law Review strongly encourages all current Saint Louis University School of Law students to consider becoming a part of the Public Law Review. Membership offers three credit hours for service per year as well as a fun, challenging, and encouraging environment and an outstanding opportunity to make valuable contacts with successful law students and prominent attorneys in the community.

Contact the Public Law Review