Saturday Schedule

November 10, 2012

Description: Midwest Clinical Conference 2012

SATURDAY

Time
Location
Event/ Topic/Presenters
8-9 AM
Vincent Immel Atrium
Breakfast

9-10:15 AM

Morrissey Hall
William H. Kniep Courtroom

Plenary
Top 20 Things Students Should Know Before Graduation

John Ammann, Saint Louis University School of Law
Patricia Harrison, Saint Louis University School of Law

10:30-11:45 AM

Concurrent Sessions:

Track A
Morrissey Hall
Room 302

Three Generations and Two-Tiers: How Opportunties to Participate in Law School Clinics have Led to and will Ultimately End the "Second-Class Citizen" Status of Clinical Law Professors

This presentation explores how generational differences in clinical education may lead to changes in tenure status for current and future clinicians. This presentation posits that because of the increase in clinical opportunities over several decades and personal experiences in law school clinics, younger faculty members will be more inclined to recognize the importance of clinical legal education and therefore more likely to support a version of a unified tenure status for current and future clinicians. This presentation further addresses how this development may raise concerns for the future of clinical legal education.

Todd Beger, Syracuse University-College of Law
Praveen Kosuri, University of Pennsylvania School of Law

Track B
Morrissey Hall
Room 304

Breaking Bad . . . News

Through interactive, hands-on exercises and videos from both the medical and legal fields, this workshop will examine how we teach students to break bad news to clients, as well as how we break bad news to students--in our clinics, in our doctrinal courses, and in our working relationships with students as research assistants. We will also consider how we ourselves receive bad news and how we can learn from our own experiences. 

Mary Prosser, University of Wisconsin Law School
Emily Hughes, University of Iowa College of Law

Track C
Morrissey Hall
Room 307

One Clinician's Path: Reshaping a Venerable Clinic to Broaden Students' Experiences and to Address a Community in Crisis

I will describe how and why I moved the Consumer Law Clinic (CLC) in new directions since becoming its Director in 2008. The most important change was to provide limited services to homeowners in foreclosure as a complement to the CLC’s traditional focus on consumer protection litigation. This has provided students with many opportunities to develop practical skills while increasing access to the courts for the clients.

Sarah J. Orr, University of Wisconsin Law School

11:45 AM-1:15 PM

St. Louis Room, Busch Center

Lunch

Doreen Dodson, Stolar Partnership and former clinical faculty, Saint Louis University School of Law

1:15-2:25 PM
Concurrent Sessions:

Track A
Morrissey Hall
Room 302

Generational Differences and Criminal Justice Issues in Clinical Courses: From Perry Mason and Andy Griffith to LA Law and Hill Street Blues to Law & Order and the Wire

This interactive session addresses generational differences and the criminal justice system. Law student and faculty perceptions of the criminal justice system are shaped in many ways including their personal experiences and the media’s portrayal of the accused, police, prosecutors, and defense lawyers. Media depictions of criminal justice in America create powerful cultural narratives that build on popular attitudes towards crime, punishment, and the social order. Experiences and attitudes about the criminal justice system and related issues, including race, socio-economic differences, and the role of the police, have changed over time, but has our teaching kept up? This session will address questions such as: Why is understanding the effects of the media on the portrayal of actors in the criminal justice system important to our teaching? How do both media portrayals of the criminal justice system and the experiences of law students and newer faculty today compare with those of prior generations? What can we learn from each other and our students to help us improve our teaching? The session will include survey results, film clips, discussion, and small group interactions.

Bradford Colbert, William Mitchell College of Law
Sarah Jane Forman, Detroit Mercy School of Law
Peter Joy, Washington University School of Law

Track B
Morrissey Hall
Room 304

Rethinking the Goal of Cultural Competence in Clinical Teaching,
With Apologies to Sue Bryant and Jean Koh Peters

Mary Jo B. Hunter, Hamline University School of Law

Track C
Morrissey Hall
Room 307

Ethics in Practice: Developing Practice-Ready Graduates
in a Field Placement Course that Teaches Legal Ethics

As law schools work toward producing graduates better prepared for practice, opportunities arise to design a field placement course with a complementary ethics seminar that enables students to engage in meaningful reflection which connects the practical experience in their externship field work with their developing knowledge of the doctrinal concepts of professional responsibility. By embedding the rules of professional conduct into the third apprenticeship of professional development in this way, students’ readiness to apply legal ethics in practice is enhanced. This program will discuss considerations in developing a field placement course that teaches legal ethics in a concurrent seminar class, as well as one model for doing so.

Denise Platfoot Lacey, University of Dayton School of Law
Liz Ryan Cole, Vermont Law School

2:25-2:35 PM
Break

2:35-3:45 PM

Concurrent Sessions:

Track A
Morrissey Hall
Room 302

Practice Ready?

Barbara J. Gilchrist, Saint Louis University School of Law
Brendan Roediger, Saint Louis University School of Law

Track B
Morrissey Hall
Room 304

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Diversity But Were Afraid to Ask

Susan McGraugh, Saint Louis University School of Law
Lauren Choate, Saint Louis University School of Law

Track C
Morrissey Hall
Room 307

Precise and Concise: the Clinic Daily Brief (CDB) Exercise

Dakota S. Rudesill, Georgetown University Law Center

3:45-4 PM
Break

4-5:15 PM

Morrissey Hall
William H. Kniep Courtroom

Plenary
The Potential for Community-Based Clinics to Advance Social Justice and Provide Clinical Education for Law Graduates: Personal, Political, and Pedagogical Challenges and Rewards

In this plenary we will examine the idea of “community lawyering” – what it means, why it is important, and how it can improve access to justice.  We will address the challenges of translating community lawyering aspirations into the context of clinical law teaching and learning.  The panelists will focus on three key components to effective community lawyering:  interfacing with client communities and building partnerships, student/client self-direction and empowerment, and collaboration.  We will pull these three components together by asking participants to engage in an exercise designed to help them explore the concepts in their own community, law school, and program contexts. The plenary will close with an opportunity for questions and an exchange of ideas.

Christine Cimini, University of Vermont
Nancy Cook, University of Minnesota Law School
Karen Tokarz, Washington University School of Law

5:30
Dinner on your own. See Restaurant Guide for suggestions.
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