Saint Louis University

CGC + ATLAS

The Sixteenth Annual Sam and Marilyn Fox Atlas Week program will be held the week of April 3 - 9, 2016. One of the main goals of the Atlas Program is to increase awareness of the global issues that confront us today in an effort not only to promote discussion, but also to inspire and inform action. It focuses on what we as global citizens can do to contribute to a better life for all people now and in the future. The Atlas Program is unique in that for one week of the year, it brings together members of the University community to focus on the global challenges that confront us in the 21st century.

The theme for the 2016 Atlas Program is "Reaching Across Borders: Embracing Our Global Community."

The keynote speaker for the week will be Kilian Kleinschmidt, an expert in humanitarian aid and refugee relief who is known as the "Mayor of Za'atari" for his work reforming the Za'atari refugee camp. The week's distinguished guest lecturer will be Dr. Mukesh Kapila, a medical doctor, humanitarian expert, and international aid diplomat known for exposing the genocide in Darfur.

Atlas Week will open with a Kick-Off event on the evening of Sunday, April 3rd. The Annual Interfaith Prayer Service will be held on Monday, April 4th in St. Francis Xavier College Church. The program will conclude on Friday, April 8th with the Parade of Nations and the Billiken World Festival.

One of the main goals of the Atlas Program is to increase awareness of the global issues that confront us today in an effort not only to promote discussion, but also to inspire and inform action. The CGC and the units that make up the Center share in Atlas Week's focus on what we as global citizens can do to contribute to a better life for all people now and in the future.

Through this collaboration, the CGC units are proud to sponsor the following Atlas Week events and invite all to attend:

Exhibit - German Immigrant Abolitionists: Fighting for a Free Missouri

February 12 - June 15
Center for Global Citizenship, Lobby Display Cases and Suite 124
Sponsored by: Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Center for International Studies, Center for Global Citizenship, and the Mellon Foundation.

Missouri is well-known for its German-American heritage, but the story of 19th-century German immigrant abolitionists is often neglected in discussions of the state's history. German Immigrant Abolitionists: Fighting for a Free Missouri tells the story of what happened when idealistic German immigrants, many highly educated and devoted to the ideals of freedom and democracy, came to a pre-Civil War slave state. Fleeing political persecution during the 1830s and 1840s, German immigrants such as Friedrich Münch, Henry Boernstein, and Franz Sigel arrived in Missouri in hopes of finding a land more congenial to their democratic ideals. When they encountered slavery, many became abolitionists and supported the Union in the emerging Civil War. German Immigrant Abolitionists: Fighting for a Free Missouri focuses on the political activism and writings of German immigrants in Missouri before and during the Civil War. Previous research on these intriguing figures has largely been confined to specialists. This exhibition contributes a compelling visual component not only for scholars but also for a wider general audience. Through a variety of photographs, historic objects, newspapers, diary entries, satirical cartoons and maps, this exhibition makes connections between the theoretical underpinnings of these activists' ideals and the realities of their everyday lives. Questions that this exhibition explores are: Who were the German abolitionists, and how did they contribute to the political landscape of pre-Civil War Missouri? Did German immigrants work closely with African-Americans in Missouri toward the common goal of ending slavery? How did the editors of and contributors to German-language newspapers in the St. Louis area change the course of the Civil War in Missouri, particularly in regards to recruiting German immigrant volunteer soldiers?

New American Wish List Collection Drive

April 3 - 9
Center for Global Citizenship Lobby & Busch Student Center North Lobby
Sponsored by: The Atlas Planning Committee

The International Institute provides new arrivals with basic household items. The Atlas Program is taking up a collection of items to donate to the organization. There will be a collection bin in the Center for Global Citizenship Lobby and Busch Student Center, North Lobby. See her for a list of needed items, and thank you for welcoming new Americans to St. Louis!

Project: ELI (Exchanging Literature Internationally) Collection Drive

April 3 - 9
Center for Global Citizenship Lobby, Busch Student Center Lobby, John Cook School of Business, School of Nursing
Sponsored by: MOVE (Motivation, Optimism, Value and Engagement) Committee

Project: ELI (Exchanging Literature Internationally), a children's book collection and distribution project, was launched on the campus of Saint Louis University (SLU) in the fall of 2013. The project seeks to create a cultural exchange of knowledge and goodwill through the sharing of children's literature. New or slightly used children's books are collected on SLU's main campus. The books are donated to children ranging in age from 6 months to 18 years of age. The project has collected 5,000 to 6,000 books and has sent and continues to send books to several locations, including Belize, Tanzania, Nepal, Madrid, Lithuania, and the St. Louis community. Through the books that Project: ELI sends to children and their communities, children are able to learn and grow while benefitting from the acquisition of English language skills that will prove to be an integral tool for them as they grow older. The books offer a cultural exchange and a new global perspective for children through the sharing of literature.
Please contact Daria Dietz (ddietz4@slu.edu) with any questions or for assistance.
For more information, click here

The Struggle Tree

April 3 - 9
Center for Global Citizenship Cubicle
Sponsored by: Housing and Residence Life, Leadership for Social Change Learning Community

The basic idea behind this Struggle Tree is to build up a physical tree to create a physical representation of the struggles of the SLU community. The Tree will be constructed using castings of people arms and hands to create a physical representation of each person. Each of these castings is supposed to be both unique and similar in the same way that our struggles are. We will then attach these castings together. We will then attach our struggles to the tree, as a way of acknowledging that these struggles are real, and allowing others to see them, and see that they are not alone. We would also like for participants to add what they think would help to mitigate these problems and help work toward a solution.


Saturday, April 2
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International Soccer Tournament

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Vandy Fields
Sponsored by: Office of International Services, International Ambassadors
This is a 5v5 soccer tournament where International and Domestic Students from SLU make teams. It is a bracket style tournament that last all day. Businesses from around SLU donate prizes. There is soccer trivia between games and people can win prizes. KSLU will DJ the event with music from around the world. Food trucks come out to serve the players, and it is a great opportunity to meet new people.
Sunday, April 3
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Atlas Kick-Off Event: A Journey Through Asia!

5:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Center for Global Citizenship Auditorium
Sponsored by: The Atlas Program, the Center for Global Citizenship, the Boeing Institute of International Business, and the Korean Student Association

Come join us for an enjoyable evening of music, dance, and delicious Asian cuisine! Atlas Week will kick-off with a performance by the Washington University student group, Samulnori. Samulnori is a traditional Korean percussion team. Saint Louis University's own Korean Student Association (KSA) will also provide a musical performance! Highlighting the rich and diverse cultural traditions of Asia, other SLU student groups will also perform, including Shakti, KOD:E, and Astha. Traditional Asian cuisine will be served from the local restaurants of Seoul Taco and Sameem Afghan and Persian Restaurant. You'll also have a chance to learn how to make origami, and you'll get a sneak preview of the Chinese Opera puppets featured in the play, "Mukashi, Muskahi", to be held during Atlas Week!

About Samulnori: "Samulnori (사물놀이) is a genre of Korean traditional percussion music. The word "samul" means "four objects" and "nori" means "play." It has its roots in Korean traditional farmers' music, which was traditionally performed in rice farming villages in order to ensure and to celebrate good harvests. Samulnori is performed with four traditional Korean musical instruments: Kkwaenggwari (a small gong), Jing (a larger gong), Janggu (an hourglass-shaped drum), and Buk (a barrel drum). These four instruments represent different weather conditions: Kkwaenggwari the thunder, Jing the wind, Janggu the rain, and Buk the clouds."


Monday, April 4
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Cultural Taste: Thai Songkran Festival

11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Center for Global Citizenship
Sponsored by: Thai Student Group, Office of International Services

Thai students will celebrate their new year, and they would like to invite all members of the SLU community to participate!

Tuesday April 5th
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Resettlement 101

10:00 - 11:00 a.m.
Center for Global Citizenship, Seminar Room 124
Sponsored by: Center for Global Citizenship, Center for International Studies, Department of Political Science

This panel will feature Bosnian and Syrian refugees and those who assist with the resettlement process. They will discuss the resettlement process, debunk common myths, and talk about help that is needed today. There will brief presentations with Q & A.

Using a Gap Year to Embrace Global Citizenship

4:45 - 5:45 p.m.
Busch Student Center 253B
Sponsored by: Center for Service and Community Engagement

Ever wondered why you have to choose your career path at such an early age? Have you ever felt that taking time off from formal education would help you figure out what you were passionate about? Have you wanted to travel, but didn't know how to set up opportunities within your budget? A "gap year" is growing more and more popular around the United States, and has become the best way for students to embrace global citizenship. At this event, students and faculty will share their experiences of a "gap year", and how it shaped their experience back at SLU. Students will also give tips on how to go about traveling with a limited budget, and how to make the most of your time ON, not off. Finally, the group will debunk myths about gap years and explain how they coincide with the mission of SLU.

Live Debate: Health Issues Across Borders

6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
Center for Global Citizenship Auditorium
Sponsored by: Center for Global Citizenship, SLU Association for International Debate, and SLU Center for Interprofessional Education and Research

The SLU Association for International Debate (SAID) promotes international understanding and the practice of communication through discussion and debates between students from Saint Louis University and from around the world. We debate topics of global significance, topics that allow us to express and discern our rights and responsibilities as global citizens. In this event, students from SAID and the IPE Health Care Systems Class (IPE 350) will debate against students from the University of New England over whether a single-payer government based health insurance system provides greater benefit to citizens than does a private-payer employer based health insurance system.

To view previous SAID debate topics and photos visit http://www.slu.edu/globalcitizenship/programs/said/said-debate-archive


Wednesday, April 6
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The Role of Non-Black People of Color in Black Lives Matter

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Center for Global Citizenship, Seminar Room 124
Sponsored by: Center for Global Citizenship, Office for Diversity and Community Engagement

Historically in the United States, the struggle for black liberation has often been accompanied by allies from other ethnic backgrounds. In a post-Ferguson SLU and St. Louis, there is often ambiguity and questioning of the role of non-black and non-white people of color in the Black Lives Matter movement. This event will have a brief presentation of the historic role of non-black people of color in the abolitionist, civil rights and anti-apartheid movements, followed by a round-table group discussion. This event will also sequel last year's ATLAS-TCK event, in focusing on the intersections of multiculturalism and activism in light of modern-day race-based social justice issues.

Speed Friendship
12:00 - 2:00 p.m.
Center for Global Citizenship Cubicles
Sponsored by: International Ambassadors, Office of International Services

In a Speed Dating-like fashion, we will engage a mix of international and domestic students with the purpose of fostering intercultural communication. 10 students in each section will sit at a table across from each other. They then will talk to the person across from them for 3 minutes. The International Ambassadors will be there to supply talking points, making sure the participants rotate until they have spoken with everyone. A contact list including student participant's names and emails will be distributed in an effort to promote further communication.

Tunnel of Oppression

1:00 - 7:00 p.m.
St. Louis Room, Busch Student Center
Sponsored by: Diversity & Global Citizenship Learning Community, Leadership for Social Change Learning Community, Women in Micah, Center for Global Citizenship, Office of International Services

Tunnel of Oppression is an impactful and informative event that draws attention to various oppressions that happen daily within SLU's community and gives participants a chance to experience, witness, and learn about those oppressions first hand. By going through different rooms in the Tunnel, each focusing on a different oppression, people can receive accurate and personal information on oppressions they may not normally consider. The Tunnel itself is a large space composed of individual rooms (office dividers), and each room contains a media piece (performance, video, scenario, etc.). Following the conclusion of the Tunnel, licensed facilitators (counselors, etc.) will lead a discussion on what participants saw and how it affected everyone. After the discussion, there is a component entitled "Wall of Hope" where students can learn more about what they can do to fight and learn more about the oppressions in the Tunnel.

Nothing to Lose but Our Chains: Student Experience in Anti-Racist Work

2:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Busch Student Center 253D
Sponsored by: MLK Scholarship Program, Cross Cultural Center, Billikens for Black Lives

The goal is to provide students the opportunity to share their experience in anti-racist work with their peers. Participants will walk away from this event with an understanding of the role of student activism within the context of a Jesuit institution. In addition, panelists and attendees will explore the benefits and challenges of undertaking an anti-racist lifestyle. The event is divided into three portions: student panel, student led small group discussions, and group share back. The panelists include Alisha Sonnier, current sophomore, MLK Scholar, and member of Tribe X, Jonathan Pulphus, junior African American Studies and Computer Science double major and initiator of OccupySLU, Sarah Nash, Show Me 15 activist and whiteness work enthusiast, and finally, Jason Ebinger, senior MLK Scholar and urban farmer. After this event, attendees will be able to define anti-racist work. Furthermore, participants will be able to understand the journey of anti-racist work, e.g. how to be an ally and understand their privileged and oppressed identities in this work. Participants will also be able to articulate how to become involved in anti-racist work. Lastly, participants will be able to establish community with others who are in the process of and/or committed to anti-racist work.

Meetings at the Margins

3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Center for Global Citizenship Auditorium
Sponsored by: Campus Ministry, Faith and Justice Collaborative, Center for Service and Community Engagement

This event features artwork created by students who went on an Immersion Experience through Campus Ministry and the Center for Service and Community Engagement over spring break. The paintings represent reflections on their experience of encountering communities in the United States that experience various forms of marginalization. While on immersion these students are challenged to: build communities that stand in solidarity with people on the margins, engage diverse expressions of spirituality, and work for justice. Students will be present to discuss how each piece reflects their experiences and those of the communities they accompanied during spring break. Communities visited by students on immersion include: rural communities in Appalachia, incarcerated individuals in Los Angeles, the L'Arche community in Mobile, Alabama, the Navajo Nation in Arizona, and the many communities affected by immigration across the southern Border of the USA and the diverse communities of St. Louis.

Faith and Justice at the US-Mexico Border: Annunciation House

7:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Center for Global Citizenship, Seminar Room 124
Sponsored by: Alpha Sigma Nu, Center for Global Citizenship, Faith and Justice Collaborative

Ruben Garcia, Founding Director of Annunciation House, will speak about his experiences operating a house of hospitality for migrants, asylum seekers, and homeless individuals at the US-Mexico border. Annunciation House has provided help to over 125,000 immigrants since it opened its doors in 1978, providing individuals a secure place to sleep, bathe, eat, and many other services. Ruben Garcia lives out his Catholic faith through service to the most vulnerable of our society. He was recently awarded "Texan of the Year" for his efforts to find shelter for the hundreds of unaccompanied minors who crossed the US border seeking refuge from the violence in their countries. El Paso Catholic Bishop Mark Seitz lauded Mr. Garcia as an exemplar of faith and justice: "In our lives we encounter many people with opinions and good causes. But only rarely do we encounter people who are so completely dedicated to their service that they will commit every aspect of their lives and every last ounce of their energy to that service. In Ruben Garcia [we] have encountered such a person."


Thursday, April 7th
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1,000 Cranes for Social Justice: Art as a Means to Building Community
9:00 - 10:00 a.m.
Center for Global Citizenship, Seminar Room 124
Sponsored by: English as a Second Language Program

The tradition of making 1,000 cranes in order to fulfill a personal hope is increasingly expanding to include community aspirations. Over the last two years, the international students and faculty in the ESL Program have made two installations of 1,000 cranes in order to provide moments of reflection on social justice in communities around the world. This presentation will focus on how the project started and then developed to include looking for donations to match the number of birds. Both installations have found sites in Ferguson, Missouri and in the historic Ville neighborhood on the north side of the City of St. Louis. The current art project involves designing and making the installation and sending it, along with a matching donation, to Project Lakota on the Lakota Nation (Pine Ridge Reservation, southwestern South Dakota). Participants will hear from representative projects receiving 1,000 cranes and find out how to help make the next project.

Tunnel of Oppression
9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Saint Louis Room, Busch Student Center
Sponsored by: Diversity & Global Citizenship Learning Community, Leadership for Social Change Community, Women in Micah, Center for Global Citizenship, Office of International Services

Tunnel of Oppression is an impactful and informative event that draws attention to various oppressions that happen daily within SLU's community and gives participants a chance to experience, witness, and learn about those oppressions first hand. By going through different rooms in the Tunnel, each focusing on a different oppression, people can receive accurate and personal information on oppressions they may not normally consider. The Tunnel itself is a large space composed of individual rooms, and each room contains a media piece. Following the conclusion of the Tunnel, licensed facilitators will lead a discussion on what participants saw and how it affected everyone. After the discussion, there is a component entitled "Wall of Hope" where students can learn more about what they can do to fight and learn more about the oppressions in the Tunnel.

1,000 Cranes for Social Justice: An Origami Demonstration
10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Center for Global Citizenship Cubicles
Sponsored by: English as a Second Language Program

Join the English as a Second Language program as they create 1,000 cranes for social justice. The first 1,000 cranes were completed in the Fall 2014 by SLU international students in order to show support for Ferguson. Stop by to learn more about the project, reflect on social justice, and to create an origami crane, or two, to be a part of the next 1,000 cranes for social justice.

Friday, April 8th
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Ethnic Minority Cultures in China: The Case of Yunnan Province

10:00 - 10:45 a.m.
Busch Student Center 253D
Sponsored by: Center for Intercultural Studies

This presentation seeks to give a general introduction to the cultures of ethnic minorities in Yunnan Province, and to provide a broad context for understanding the 55 ethnic minorities in China. Due to Yunnan's varied historical, topographical and cultural interactions, its 25 ethnic minority groups display an impressive diversity of customs and cultures. The issues China faces are conservation, transmission and sustainable development of the cultures of ethnic minorities in the face of modernization and globalization. To attain these goals, it seeks to forge a dynamic relationship among economy, ethnic culture, and ecology.

The speaker for this event will be Dr. Ling Wang, Professor at Yunnan University in China. She obtained her M.A. degree in English Linguistics and Literature from Yunnan University in 1996. From 2000 to 2001, she was a visiting scholar at the School of English Studies at the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom. She was awarded a Ph.D. degree in ethnic cultures and arts by Yunnan University in 2006. From 2009 to 2013, she was a postdoctoral researcher in arts at Fujian Normal University. Professor Wang has had over 50 papers and six books published in Chinese or English, at home and abroad.

Parade of Nations

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
West Pine Mall
Sponsored by: International Student Federation, Billiken World Festival Planning Committee, SGA International Affairs Committee, Center for Global Citizenship, Cross Cultural Center, and the Atlas Program

The Parade of Nations kicks off the Billiken World Festival activities and features SLU students carrying flags from around the world. Soldan International Studies High School's Marching Band and the Billiken will lead the Parade! If you would like to carry a flag in the Parade, please click here


Billiken World Festival

12:00 - 2:00 p.m.
Center for Global Citizenship
Sponsored by: International Student Federation, Billiken World Festival Planning Committee, SGA International Affairs Committee, Center for Global Citizenship, Cross Cultural Center, and the Atlas Program

The Parade of Nations kicks off the Billiken World Festival activities and features SLU students carrying flags from around the world. At the Billiken World Festival, student organizations offer delicious foods representing their respective cultures, heritages, and countries.
The festival also features live cultural music and dance performances. The Billiken World Festival is the first large-scale diversity program organized on campus, with more than 40 different student groups, university departments, and over eighteen hundred students coming together in a celebration of culture and diversity.

To see a complete listing of 2016 ATLAS events, click here.

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