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Senior Design

Senior Design Graphic

During the fall and spring semesters of their senior year, engineering and aviation students participate in a capstone experience, called Senior Design. 

Students form teams to research, design, and even produce a prototype of an original system of their own design. These courses bring together many  concepts that were introduced in the undergraduate curriculum.

2021 Senior Design Projects

Aerospace Engineering

image of UAVProject CERES

Minasse Bakri,  Klaus Damasceno, Jordan Harris, Francesco Moro

Project CERES aims to provide farmers with personalized, drone-based solutions for pesticide application, land surveying, flight planning, risk management, and more. Our program interface streamlines the consultation process by assessing the farmer's situation from a few simple questions.   Based on the regional atmospheric conditions, the farmer is provided with a tailored catalog of affordable drone products and services as well as an interactive simulation of the drone's performance, all with the goal of optimizing the farmer's success.

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logo of plane with additional wingsProject Local Hawk

Max Friesen, Grant Lehmkuhl,  Anthony Nwajei,  Jaimin Shah, Will Tihen

The current drones that are fielded for extended surveillance are large aircraft that operate from dedicated airfields, or smaller drones used for tactical level surveillance for short durations. The larger drones are easily spotted and shot down, while smaller drones like quadcopters are ill suited for longer range missions. Team Local Hawk seeks to fill the gap by providing a fixed-wing aircraft that surveys a target one mile away for one hour.  We are building a drone with a 6 foot wing span that can survey a target at a distance of 1 to 2 miles 400 feet in the sky (limited by FAA regulations) for a period of 1 hour. The drone will be able to fly FPV and have a camera. The mission statement is as follows: The aircraft will be able to provide continuous surveillance of an area within one mile of the ground station at a low altitude for at least one hour on a standard day while maintaining a low visual and acoustic profile. 

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square group photo of members of the senior design projectProject Magnus

Joseph Doyle, David Ferrante, Kyle Goldman, Cody Powers, Steven Solloway, Clayton Staszewski

The landscape of the aerospace market is changing significantly today. Aircraft are required to obtain new levels of maneuverability and efficiency as the global market expands into commercializing small vehicle flight in dense urban centers. Examples of such expansions include the use of small unmanned vehicles to deliver packages and aerial taxi services to transport passengers from place to place. To meet this need, Project Magnus is looking to innovate an entirely new flight control system on a small aircraft platform. The objective of this project is to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of a Magnus Effect-based flight control system. The aerodynamic functions of traditional control effectors can be transferred to rotating cylinders positioned at locations on the aircraft that are analogous to the traditional effectors. The benefits of this system include improved handling characteristics during low-speed flight (i.e. near stall, during takeoff, and during landing) and a diminished necessity for an advantageous angle of attack, as is the case for the traditional counterpart control surface. By spinning the cylinders at different angular speeds and in different directions, the aerodynamic forces on the aircraft body can be manipulated in both a stabilizing and controlling manner. Furthermore, the cylinder geometry can be varied to optimize for different flight regimes. Preliminary tests have validated early mathematical and numerical analyses, which predicted that the effectiveness of these control surfaces would be dictated by the freestream airflow, angular velocity of the cylinder, cylinder dimensions, and cylinder positioning. This project currently entails applying the Magnus Effect system to a custom manufactured remote-control aircraft in order to corroborate the findings from the preliminary tests and computational analysis. After collecting flight test data, the group will be able to better assess the effectiveness and successful implementation of Magnus Effect control effectors in comparison to traditional aircraft control surfaces.

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Group Photo in the McDonnell Douglas Hall Rotunda Project SPIRL

Abby Harris, John Kloser, Damian Oven, Celia Taylor-Puckett, Brian Thomas

Spacecraft Prototype Investigating Reduced Lifetime (Project SPIRL) is a demonstration mission of a deployable de-orbit device intended for use on CubeSats to achieve the internationally agreed upon requirement of deorbit within 25 years of a spacecraft’s end of operation. The de-orbit device is being developed for use on CubeSats between the 3U and 6U standard sizes in orbits up to 700 km. The mission consists of two spacecraft named Fibonacci SPIRL, which will use active attitude control methods, and Euler SPIRL, which will use passive attitude control methods. The device consists of four spooled booms and a mylar sail that is deployed with a burn wire. The booms are swept back to increase aerodynamic stability. A full analysis of the de-orbit of each spacecraft with the designed device is being completed using an open-source attitude simulation and the High-Performance Orbit Propagator from AGI’s Systems Tool Kit (STK). 

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Group members pose with the prototype they designedProject Sweet Lightning

Daniel Angkiat, Justin Fantroy, Zhulien Donchev, Haochen Rong, Kevin Rohrkaste

Project Sweet Lightning is a capstone design project with a team consisting of five aerospace engineering undergraduate seniors at Saint Louis University. The project itself entails the design, fabrication, and flight testing of a fixed wing drone platform to compete in the Student Unmanned Aerial Systems (SUAS) competition hosted by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). Team members are using experience from research involvement and internships, as well as knowledge obtained from classroom to successfully design, build and fly a platform for the student competition.

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Group members standing in the rotunda of McDonnell Douglas HallProject Wayfinder in Space, Descending Onto Moon (WIS•DOM): A Mission Concept for CubeSat Lunar Landers

Caleb Burlison, Samantha Carlowicz, Megan Estrada, Claire Schuessler

The Wayfinder In Space, Descending Onto Moon (WIS•DOM) mission seeks to extend the low-cost, low-risk mission model Small Satellites are known for in Earth orbit to interplanetary missions with the goal of making deep space exploration more accessible than the current space market allows. The objective of this Senior Design project was to conduct a feasibility study on the design of a CubeSat rideshare spacecraft whose purpose is to deliver generic 1U-sized payloads to the lunar surface via controlled landing upon deployment from a rideshare platform. This Phase A study served to establish a foundation for the CubeSat lunar lander concept rather than a definitive path to flight. The results of analysis proved the design infeasible at the chosen mission parameters but with potential to succeed given adjustments to the mission profile.

Aviation Science

senios design group standing in front of wallBiometric Security and Protecting Privacy

Malik Larcher, Austin Lu, Johanes Munua, Harrison Niswonger, Brad Terjelian

We currently live in a digital age where everything is linked to the cloud, but how do we protect people’s information using the biometrics systems to help curb those that want to fake their identity? Countries in Europe have successfully implemented third party biometric systems with government regulation. Can the United States use a similar system or approach with biometric authentication? Use of the government will help set a standard to hold third party companies accountable to protect people’s 4th amendment rights. Is this biometric system going to be a viable long term solution? What costs would be involved with going through with this approach compared to what the FAA has already done with NextGen? The goal of putting together this system along with implementing biometrics is to add an extra layer of security when it comes to air travel while also protecting people’s 4th amendment rights.

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Biomedical Engineering

Headshot of Charles WestBiomimetic Sponges and Gelatin Based Microspheres for Controlled Drug Delivery in Treatment of VML Injury

Charles West

Volumetric muscle loss (VML) injuries are characterized by a heightened and persistent inflammatory response involving both the innate and adaptive immune system. An overactive and dysregulated immune response is associated with fibrotic tissue deposition and impaired muscle regeneration. 
To modulate the inflammatory response in VML injured muscles, the sustained delivery of an immunosuppressant drug, FK-506, will be used in this project. Previous research has shown that implantation of biomimetic sponges that contain ECM proteins such as gelatin, collagen, and laminin-111 support muscle regeneration following VML. To improve the extent of muscle regeneration, we hope to bioengineer a sustained delivery system for FK-506 using the biomimetic sponges. FK-506 can be encapsulated into gelatin microbeads which can be incorporated into the three- dimensional sponge matrix.  During my senior year, I will develop a sustained release drug delivery system. Briefly, I will develop a method for creating FK-506 loaded gelatin microspheres. A range of FK-506 concentrations between 25-100 µM will be tested. The microspheres will be incorporated in biomimetic sponges that are composed of gelatin, collagen, laminin-111, and are cross-linked with EDC. The drug release will be measured using an ELISA kit and spectroscopy measurements. This combination will then be implanted and tested in a rodent VML model during my 5th year.

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Photo of Austin KrohnCharged, Functionalized PEG Cryogels for Articular Cartilage Regeneration

Austin Krohn

This project combines the two fields of polymer chemistry and tissue engineering to create a novel device for increased collagen deposition in-vitro. To accomplish this, functionalized PEG cryogels with the RGDS sequence will be made with three different charges, positive, neutral, and negative, using peptide chains built into the scaffold. By growing cells in a charged PEG cryogel, this will allow the cells to grow in a crowded environment more similar to in-vivo conditions; thus, allowing for a higher degree of collagen deposition and articular cartilage formation. The ultimate goal of this project is to grow articular cartilage in laboratories for implantation into patients. 

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Candid photo of Madeline AndresDevelopment of a technique for controlled anisotropy in chitosan-gelatin cryogels for use in bone tissue engineering

Madeline Andres

In tissue engineering, development of an appropriate scaffold is crucial to support positive cell interaction. The use of cryogel scaffolds, specifically in bone tissue engineering, shows promise due to their macroporous structure, but the pore size, distribution, and interconnectivity is highly variable depending on the fabrication process. The objective of the current research is to provide a technique for controlled anisotropy in chitosan-gelatin cryogels to create scaffolds which are better suited for tissue engineering. Cryogel pore structure can be controlled through alteration of certain freezing parameters, so to achieve the desired structure, several molds were designed using CAD software to be used in the freezing process. After freezing in the molds, the resulting pore structure was observed using scanning electron microscopy which showed pores that were larger, aligned with each other, and had greater interconnectivity when compared to the control. Further testing includes additional pore analysis and mechanical testing. 

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Photo of Alyssa Brown and Juliana Modde in the labDevelopment of a Tibial Fracture Callus Model and Appropriate Testing Apparatus 

Alyssa Brown and Juliana Modde

The focus of our project was to design a model of a tibial fracture and appropriate testing set-up to evaluate the model when sound waves from an ultrasound were applied. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound is currently used for treatment of non-unions in which the healing phases have ceased. This therapy does have some contradicting results, so our research was an attempt to further investigate how the waves from the ultrasound moves through a fracture site. The fracture model was fabricated using PolyJet printing, with materials chosen based on mechanical and acoustic testing to verify similarity to bone. Fused-deposition modeling was used to create a specific fracture holder so that the model was held when ultrasound was applied and a hydrophone measured the magnitudes of the waves passing through the model. this is just one step in research that needs to be done to further support the use of LIPUS to treat non-unions. 

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Photo of Katelyn CavinessFabrication of Radiopaque Resorbable Polyethylene Glycol Microspheres using Microfluidics for Chemoembolization Procedures to Treat Prostate Cancer

Katelyn Caviness

This project seeks to develop radiopaque hydrogel microsphere embolic particles to be used in a novel, minimally invasive, and localized chemoembolization treatment for prostate cancer. My research aims to characterize the amount of barium sulfate needed to achieve linear attenuation values greater than cortical bone, allowing the microspheres to be seen on intraoperative clinical CT. Research also aims to develop microspheres with consistent and homogenous radiopacity throughout the microspheres and clinically relevant degradation times.

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Mesenchymal Stem Cell-derived Exosomes in VML Injury Model

Allison Paoli

Exosomes are nanovesicles secreted by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for intercellular communication. The major advantage to using exosomes over MSCs is that they can avoid issues associated with stem cell transplantation such as poor cell survival and engraftment, and potential pulmonary embolism. Using established techniques, the exosomes are isolated and characterized to be used in a murine model, using an optimized delivery method. This model will involve a volumetric muscle loss (VML) injury, which is characterized by damage to the muscle greater than 20%.

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Opisense prototype - white plastic with branded nameOpisense

Mariam Akbani, Nicole Bajerek, Annalise Hilker, William Speciale, Kenji Yanaba

Opisense is a wearable biosensor and mobile health application that records patient data in real time and compiles it for use by their care team during visits. In providing this physiological data, Opisense significantly increases patient engagement and quality of care.
Opisense is a solution that provides real-time noninvasive health data collection and streamlined event analysis to enhance clinical decision making. The biosensor itself measures heart rate, respiration, skin temperature, and electrodermal activity. Each of these parameters can indicate both withdrawal and abuse episodes. Raw data is then fed to the Opisense application via Bluetooth, where it is stored, processed, analyzed, and compiled for the patient and their care team.

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 Photo of Jeffrey Au and Hannah ChauvinOptimization of Electrical Stimulation as Treatment for Volumetric Muscle Loss

Jeffrey Au and Hannah Chauvin 

The goal of this project is to develop a technique for performing eccentric exercise training using electrical stimulation of the peroneal nerve in VML injured rat hindlimbs. Based on previous studies, each rat should perform 4 sets of 5 eccentric contractions twice weekly for 4-5 weeks. Using the Aurora Scientific equipment in the lab, eccentric contractions can be performed by stretching the anterior crural muscles from 19° of ankle dorsiflexion to 19° of ankle plantarflexion, simultaneous to stimulating the nerve using subcutaneous electrodes. The parameters to optimize include stimulation current (20-40 mA) and frequency (50-150 Hz). The aim is to prevent muscle fatigue and damage while allowing for strength gains over time. Measurement of peak force will be used to determine the extent of fatigue, damage, or strength gain.

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photo of Jan MangulabnanRobotic Echocardiogram

Jan Mangulabnan

According to the American Heart Association, approximately 48% of Americans have some form of cardiac disease and for many, cause irreversible damage to the heart. Cardiac disease can be diagnosed early using echocardiograms to prevent damage; however, echo procedures have limited efficiency and accessibility. The usage of medical robotics and machine learning can help mediate this issue. The robotic echocardiogram system studied in this project will us an ultrasound transducer probe attached to a KUKA robotic arm for later use with a program for real-time echo analysis to adjust the probe position and obtain the necessary echocardiogram. This system will execute an automatic procedure that would reduce the time necessary for performing the echo and finding a diagnosis in applications of remote consultation. This research has implications for improving patient needs for early detection to prevent progression of cardiac disease and further interdisciplinary research in medical robotics and machine learning.

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Biomedical, Computer and Electrical Engineering 

Collage of team members in Team NASRABiosensor for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Team NASRA: Madi Feldman, Zach Goliszewski, Trent Mortera, Akash Patel

Within the device, there is a temperature sensor aspect to this product allowing for body temperature to be measured. Body temperature of NAS babies is necessary to know so when a fever is present, the product will be able to detect and notify the user of this. This product will have an app to collude with the biosensor in order to provide the user with the most accurate data. The app prompts the user with multiple questions pertaining to the baby’s well-being. A product to prevent prolonged and unnecessary stays along with prevention of long term complications and sometimes even death is required. The device being developed will provide critical data related to the instantaneous status of the NAS baby. Therefore, eliminating complications and allowing for a safer NICU experience. 

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Team members in BME-EE Team Clyindric-AIDCylindric-AID

Zahraa Al-Ater, Brendan Hennessy, Darren O'Brien, Nicole St. Clair, Christian Witte

Cylindric-AID is a text reader for the visually impaired designed to extract and relay information from objects that typically do not work with other text readers due to irregular shapes. A common problem identified with current text readers on the market is that they cannot accurately read labels that are on irregular objects, such as prescription bottles and canned goods. This device provides information from labels and accurately reads expiration dates; a common nuisance among those that are visually impaired. This is accomplished by placing an object on a turntable which then rotates and takes images. These images are then processed using image stitching and optical character recognition to obtain information that is relayed through text to speech to the user. 

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Team members in front of the statue in the McDonnell Douglas Hall RotundaFall Alert

Caleb Berberet, Atanasio de Erausquin, Samuel Hughes, Caleb Potter

 The device will use pressure sensors to collect meaningful data that can be read in real time to analyze the gait of the individual. This data would be integrated into an android application that would monitor the gait of the individual and provide useful feedback and alerts to notify the individual if they are demonstrating symptoms that could lead to a fall related injury. The device would give the user helpful information to actively monitor their walking habits, but also give physicians accurate information on the patient’s ability to prevent fall related injuries. There is a major need for this technology as there are currently no products that actively prevent fall with gait analysis during each step of an individual’s walk. The risk related to serious fall related injury is most harmful to those in the elderly populations and those who have diseases that affect their balance and coordination. Therefore, this fall prevention device will improve the patient’s sense of their own physical wellbeing by providing real time analysis of their movement, and hopefully prevent fall related injuries to those who use the product with alerts to aid in self correction. 

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Infraready Group PhotoInfraready: A Tablet-Based Temperature Measurement System for Businesses

Cemil Can Ali Marandi, Emma Anderson, Katherine Gesior, Sarah Gould, Emma Speh

A person’s temperature will be measured by an external contactless infrared thermometer
connected to a tablet through the charging port and the temperature data will be transferred to an app on the tablet. The app will inform the user of their temperature and if it is within the acceptable range. The need for this device arises with the COVID-19 pandemic. Fever is a common symptom of the virus and many businesses now require temperature screenings for employees before they enter the facilities. This device would make temperature screening measurement more convenient for individuals by requiring them to take their temperature before being allowed entrance into a building. This is also more reliable than employees self-reporting their temperatures. COVID-19 creates an immediate application for this product, but it can be used beyond the pandemic for tracking employee health.

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Collage of Look Behind Team MembersLook Behind 

Jackie Curry, Joe Kuebrich. Brian Murphy, Alex Sepe, Patrick Yang

Our product, The Look Behind, is an alert system for runners and bikers that are using headphones while they exercise. It utilizes principles of Radar technology to accurately detect motion behind the individual that they would not normally be able to sense. The Radar sensor sends a signal into the environment and measures the returned signal to detect the presence of an object and how fast it is travelling. This system would then allow someone to know there is anything approaching from behind through haptic feedback vibration and give them enough time to react.

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Team Members for the Opioid BiosensorOpioid Biosensor and Symptom Tracker App

Savannah Bogner, Patrick Horst, Vishnu Rangachari, Helen Richards, Joe Sloyan

For over 20 years the United States has been the midst of an opioid crisis which creates an overall economic burden of about $75.8 billion each year. Much of the devastation of the crisis can be attributed to the lack of accessible treatment for recovering opioid abuse patients, with many patients returning to opioid abuse after being admitted into the emergency department for opioid overdose. To address this problem, we are creating a wearable opioid biosensor and symptom tracker app that will allow the patient to monitor physiological trends associated with opioid use. The opioid biosensor will track respiratory rate, heart rate, and skin temperature to detect physical changes. The symptom tracker provides the patient with an interface for inputting daily symptoms using predetermined questions and viewing reports of daily trends. The aim of this device is to increase the user’s awareness of the trends related to their opioid use.

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Team Members for Project AutumnProject Autumn

Fatima Al-Hanoosh, Mallory Grote, Emily Mouser, Ryan Wilks, Kat Zaber

Our project is a wearable fall prediction and detection device that will predict and ultimately help the user prevent themselves from falling. Our design consists of an IMU sensor which measures the user’s acceleration and orientation in real time. The IMU sensor chosen for this project, known as the MetaMotionR by mbientlab, is bluetooth compatible with common IOS and Android devices, allowing data collected by the sensor to be sent wirelessly to an app. Data is streamed directly from the sensor to a created app, and upon detection of values outside a given range, the app will produce an alert that the user is imbalanced or has fallen. These ranges were obtained through testing that signify “normal” actions of the user, such as walking or standing. Our design will improve upon currently available fall detection technology by providing fall prediction alerts rather than only alerting when the patient has fallen. 

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Team Members for RFI-DIYrfiD.I.Y- RFID Based Smart Home System

Matthew Brawner, Michaela Giltner, Miranda Kaleel, Yasir Khan, Anthony Lam

Kitchens present many obstacles and dangers to those with visual impairment without proper identification, which may not be safe by touch alone. By altering ultrahigh frequency RFID tags to include a phototransistor component, light intensity data on the tag can be transmitted to a central RFID reader. The reader elicits a response after processing the data, providing the user feedback based on the current application of the tag. These tags have an adhesive backing and can be moved and programmed to perform various functions around the kitchen. Sensors assist in many situations where tactile feedback is dangerous such as stove top burner positions, knife selections, and button identification for various appliances. This technology would also provide protective warnings if cabinets, ovens, or refrigerators are left open to prevent possible hazards. This market is becoming increasingly relevant as smart appliances become more common, but lack safeguards for visually impaired users. 

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Team Members for Rider Alert SystemRider Alert System (RAS)

Eric Adamany, Suzi Albarcha, Michael Geer, Stephanie Grant

The Rider Alert System (RAS) is a device that will detect when runner or biker is approaching the user from behind and alert them to the potential hazard. The RAS will be able to detect an image from the rear of the user, process the incoming data and determine if it is a person or a biker from a set distance, and will then alert the user. The system design includes two sections: the sensing components and the alerting components. The sensing components include a small Raspberry Pi camera will be mounted to the back of the user and will detect the environment behind them and a Nvidia Jetson Dev Kit microcontroller that will analyze the images. The alerting components include an Arduino Nano, a motor controller, and an ERM motor that will vibrate on the wrist of the user to alert them to a hazard. 

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Group Photo of Team SmartMatA Fallen Object Detector for the Visually Impaired or Blind: The SmartMat

Jack Bessey, Lili Hostetler, Christian L'ltalien, Gabriela Ronning-Arnesen, Ian Sover 

As in-home “Smart” technology continues to advance for the general population, “Smart” technology for the disabled community, specifically the visually impaired or blind, lacks new and innovative designs. Therefore this study aims to pave the way for updated in-home technological accommodations for the blind or visually impaired population with the SmartMat. The SmartMat is a pressure sensitive mat designed to detect and audibly iterate where a dropped object can be retrieved.

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Team Members in Team ThermoGoThermoGo

Yosita Beamer, Robert Campbell, Ryan Jasper, Keller Murray, Aaron Sala

Monitoring symptoms of illness, especially during the time of a pandemic, is of the utmost importance. However, many temperature monitoring products on the market are expensive, inconvenient, and only provide information for one specific point in time. This project is focused on developing a product that will enable people to continuously monitor their temperature by using their cell phones. Developing a small, non-invasive product with Bluetooth capabilities that can be integrated into a face mask is the solution to this problem that society faces daily. The addition of LED lights along with the development of a cell phone app will allow for symptom tracking without violation of privacy laws. While this product will not be able to monitor all symptoms, the ability to accurately monitor one’s own temperature, especially during a global health crisis, will help to improve the health and safety of the general public.

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Zoom screen shot of ThermoSTAT groupthermoSTAT Bluetooth Thermometer

Emma Leoni, Abby Nelson, Ifeanyi Ekpunobi, Kieran Singhal, Lorenzo Zamora

The purpose of this project was to develop a thermometer and phone application system that could assist with streamlining temperature checks for COVID-19. In the United States, the pandemic has affected 29.9 million Americans since March 2020, and has had a significant impact on our communities. A primary method of health screening is symptom tracking, which includes analysis of all potential symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, congestion, fatigue, and most importantly, fever. Our thermometer, known as thermoSTAT, aims to connect temperature reporting directly with other symptom tracking metrics by linking to a smartphone application via Bluetooth. Within the mobile app, users will be able to input their current symptoms and traveling history, and then record their temperature using the hand-held thermometer. Use of this system will encourage personal accountability of individuals, and help them to protect their community by preventing virus transmission.

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Third Eye group photoThird Eye: Alert System

Jeremy Bennick, Corbin Daiber, Katie Huskey, Emma Nehring, and Gonzalo Rodriguez-Vila

This design is a proposal for a pedestrian alert system to monitor and notify users of obstacles approaching behind them. A camera imaging system and a LIDAR sensor will be used to identify and track approaching runners, hikers, bikers and other potential hazards. Hiking trails can have blind corners and congested paths that can lead to accidental collisions and injuries. This is an especially prevalent issue with mixed use trails that may have hikers, runners and bikers sharing the same narrow trail. The “Third Eye: Alert System” has been developed to have a multiple sensor approach to this problem which will allow this alert system to ignore stationary objects commonly found on these trails such as trees, hills or rocks while still alerting the user when and on what side faster trail users are approaching from. This will ensure that the trail can safely be shared between users and non users. This alert system will also function in residential areas as well as trails to alert pedestrians of runners or bikers approaching them from behind. This will also support user notifications through a vibration so the user can be confident about his or her safety while running, hiking and biking in his or her area of choice. 

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Trustride Group PhotoTruStride: Wearable Gait Training System

Evan Capelle, Collin Fricke, Lauren Ketelhohn, Brendan McGreal, Julian Saliba

Over 800,000 patients are hospitalized because of fall injuries, and the medical costs total over $50 billion annually. Our idea is to develop a gait training system using wearable sensors to reduce fall risk for patients. By focusing on improving patient gait, we are taking a preventative approach to reduce fall injuries. Our design consists of a belt clip and two shoe insoles which house inertial measurement units, force sensors, processors, and a user interface. Our system, named TruStride, is designed to be worn by patients identified by physical therapists to have high fall risk. It will detect metrics of patients’ gait and provide information to both the patients and the physical therapists to improve patients’ form, making them proficient and confident in their walking ability.

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Civil Engineering

Preservation Perspective Group Collage PhotoBetter Family Life Remediation and Restoration

Preservation Perspective: Sophia Brouwer, Mya Ford, Madeline Karlson, Pablo Mattingly, Jessica Sullivan

The main interests of this project include the following: environmental impact, community preservation, and rehabilitation assessment. The home will be restored with an open floor plan and the existing back porch will be demolished and restored as well, to capture the history of the property. The implementation of an open concept floor plan will optimize the living space by eliminating some of the pre-existing partition walls. This will not only increase the amount of natural light that permeates the home, but it will also increase the function of several spaces as well as increase the layout’s flexibility. The community garden will offer residents and community members with the opportunity to produce a fresh and sustainable food source. Additionally, it will create a space that promotes community engagement.

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Urbanature Cityscape photoBrickline Greenway

UrbaNature: Jonathan Duffié, Mary Rohatgai, Joseph Seib, Jacob Zlotopolski 

Design of an extension of the Brickline Greenway extension at Busch Stadium. Lot is located on the corner of Cerre street and 8th street. Project entails a bio retention basin, pedestrian and bike pathway, and hardcape recreation area. 

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Project Sunflower Expansion GraphicProject Sunflower Expansion

COMBS Engineering Group: Hana Baban, James Coyne, Madeline Mueller, Matthew O'Neil, Liuce Siliunas

COMBS Engineering is leading the Sunflower Garden Expansion project to alleviate food scarcity in Saint Louis. Project Sunflower is a community garden located in North Saint Louis that was established by the nonprofit organization, the Fit and Food Connection. The main goals for this project, expressed by the client, are to increase food production, create educational opportunities, and improve food access for the surrounding community. To achieve these goals, the project encompasses three parts: an extended garden space, a multi-use pavilion and pergola, and improvements to civil infrastructure for site accessibility and functionality. This capstone project concludes with a completed set of construction documents. 

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Collage of a group photo of the Tiles Park Splash Pad Restoration GroupTilles Park Splash Pad Restoration

SMAAL Engineering: Jabria al Rashid, Alaina Andert, Evan Landewee, Emilio Mattingly, Hanna Schiffhauer

Our project improves the Tilles Park splash pad in the City of St. Louis. The existing splash pad is a simple concrete pad. SMAAL Engineering will be improving this to a soft, safe flooring with several new water features. Additionally, SMAAL will be designing a pavilion next to the splash pad.

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Mechanical Engineering

Group Photo of Autonomous Lawn Care Robot TeamAutonomous Lawn Care Robot

The Benchwarmers: Patrick Eustace, Riley Horton, Margaret Richard, Kyle Romero, Zachary Sarvis,  Conor Treese

This project has the end goal of creating a cost effective, safe, autonomous machine that can perform grass cutting to eliminate the need to take time out of a consumer's day. The team conceptualized multiple ideas, and ultimately decided to proceed with this project. There are three reasons we chose this project: it would be more sustainable than traditional lawn mowers, as it is battery powered, we thought it would be a great challenge of our skills and knowledge, and we thought it would force us to reach out to experts in fields that we lack skills in, teaching us to network.

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Group photo of Frisbee Launcher for DogsFrisbee Launcher for Dogs

The Battlehawks: Jacob Bullard, Will Florence, Trever Johnson, Jeremiah Kirsch, Drew Ottenlips

Over 63 million American households include a dog as a pet, and 37% of Boomers own a dog. For various reasons, many adults, including older adults, are unable to throw a frisbee far enough to satisfy their dog’s desire to play. While there are ball launchers and other throw assisting devices on the market, none launch a frisbee to have a dog retrieve it. The Battlehawks Frisbee Launching Device for Dogs will effectively satisfy a dog’s energy while minimizing the effort and skill required by the owner. It will be a safe, sustainable, reliable, and profitable product that is affordable and easy to use by average people who are unable to throw a frisbee to meet their dog’s energy level.

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Collage of group members in the the fuel nozzle groupFuel Nozzle

Trailer Park Boys : Andrew Behrens, Jakob Henry, Joseph Schwartz, Cory Thiesen, Kameron Wallace, Michael Wilson

The vision was to design a high flow, no spill fuel nozzle that is safe and comfortable for all users. Modern fuel nozzles tend to have ease of use issues along with poor flow rates. By surveying and research, we obtained a product that appeals to all areas while increasing performance. 

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View previous Senior Design Symposium projects by clicking here to see the 2019 Senior Design Project booklet as a PDF or click click here to view on ISSUU