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Faculty in the Center for Neuroscience

The Henry and Amelia Nasrallah Center for Neuroscience brings together researchers and clinicians throughout Saint Louis University who share a common interest in the neurosciences.

Members

Omar Ahmad
Omar Ahmad
Occupational Therapy
Doisy College of Health Sciences
syed.ahmad@health.slu.edu
Micheal A. Anch
Micheal A. Anch
Psychology
a.anch@health.slu.edu
Michael Ariel
Michael Ariel
Michael Ariel

Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
michael.ariel@health.slu.edu

Dr. Michael Ariel investigates how the brain normally processes sensory inputs.  A microelectrode tip is positioned within an animal’s brain stem that is maintained in vitro while still connected to the eyes and temporal bones.  The neuronal activity amplified at that tip is recorded in response to either visual stimulation of the eye, vibration of the ear drum or rotation of the head.  One goal of this research is to understand how these sensory inputs control eye movements that lead to the perception of a stable visual world as we move our head or body through our environment. 

The experiments are performed on neural tissues from pond turtles because of the unique ability of those isolated brain tissues to remain responsive to natural sensory stimuli while lacking blood flow to provide oxygen.  Another goal of Dr. Ariel’s research is to determine if these sensory signals can activate the brain stem even during a total lack of oxygen (anoxia).  In the normal environment of these turtles in North America, they remain submerged each winter under the frozen surface of fresh water ponds.  Dr. Ariel’s experiments hope to reveal which of the sensory systems still function during these winter months in the icy winter waters.  Understanding the mechanism of brain survival during anoxia may be important for the treatment of stroke in which oxygenated blood flow is blocked in the human brain.


Yuna Ayala

Yuna Ayala
Biochemistry
Schoool of Medicine
yuna.ayala@health.slu.edu

Alaina Baker-Nigh
Alaina Baker-Nigh
Biology, Program in Neuroscience
College of Arts and Science
alaina.bakernigh@slu.edu
 Subhashis Banerjee
Banerjee
Subhashis Banerjee

Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
subhashis.banerjee@health.slu.edu
 
Dr. Subhashis Banerjee is an assistant research professor in internal medicine - geriatrics at Saint Louis University School of Medicine.  He is also one of the co-directors managing University's Metabolic Core Facility. Dr. Banerjee completed his Ph.D. from University of Kentucky in 2010. Subsequently, he completed his postdoctoral trainings from The Scripps Research Institute, Florida and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.  He also worked as a scientist in the Department of Physiology, Oxford University, UK.  He has broad research expertise, which includes drug discovery, drug delivery, vascular biology, metabolism and circadian rhythm biology. As a postdoctoral fellow, he was involved in the creation of molecular screens that could lead to synthetic protein modulators of orphan nuclear receptors with potential applications in autoimmune diseases, cancer and cholesterol metabolism.  One of his key publications demonstrated that synthetic ligands targeting a main component of the mammalian clock, the nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and β, regulate sleep architecture and emotional behavior in mice (Banerjee et al 2014 Nature Communications).  His research also showed that REV-ERB agonists induce wakefulness and reduce anxiety-like behavior.  Dr. Banerjee presently works with peptide hormone adropin, the hepatic expression of which responds to circadian and nutrient specific cues. The overarching hypothesis of his research is that adropin regulates glucose metabolism in part through bidirectional modulation of hepatic glucagon and insulin signaling. In another project, he is investigating about adropin overexpression and prevention of age- related cognitive decline using several genetically engineered mouse models. A list of his publications and cited work can be found at https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=VYjQpVEAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=ao   Born to physician parents in Kolkata India, Dr. Banerjee is a trained soccer player and enjoys participating in debates about current affairs.

Jeffrey Bishop
Jeffrey Bishop
Center for Health Care Ethics
jeffrey.bishop@slu.edu
Tony Buchanan

Tony Buchanan
Psychology
College of Arts and Sciences
tony.buchanan@slu.edu

Andrew Butler

Andrew Butler
Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
andrew.butler@health.slu.edu

Anutosh Chakraborty

Anutosh Chakraborty
Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
anutosh.chakraborty@health.slu.edu

Pratap Chand
Pratap Chand
Pratap Chand

Neurology
School of Medicine
pratap.chand@health.slu.edu

Dr. Pratap Chand has been an academic neurologist for more than 35 years and has been at SLU since 2008.  He specializes in movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease and other disorders of movement.  He also specializes in deep brain stimulation brain microelectrode recording during brain surgery and programming these implanted devices for Parkinson’s disease, tremor, dystonia and OCD, as well as botulinum toxin injection for movement disorders.  He also is active in clinical research in each of those areas and in clinical trials of newer medicines for movement disorders and has researched a rat model of Parkinson’s with Dr. Anch.  He is interested in developing cell cultures of dopaminergic neurons.

Liz Chiarello
Liz Chiarello
Sociology and Anthropology
liz.chiarello@slu.edu
Yi-Fang Chiu
Yi-Fang Chiu
Communication Science and Disorders
yifang.chiu@health.slu.edu
Daniel Daly

Daniel Daly
Center for Anatomical Science and Education
School of Medicine
daniel.daly@health.slu.edu

Timothy Doyle

Timothy Doyle
Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
timothy.doyle@health.slu.edu

Meghan Doherty
Meghan Doherty
Occupational Therapy
Doisy College of Health Sciences
meghan.doherty@health.slu.edu
Terrance Egan
Terrance Egan
Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
terrance.egan@health.slu.edu
Susan Farr
Susan Farr
Susan Farr

Internal Medicine - Geriatrics
School of Medicine
susan.farr@health.slu.edu

Dr. Susan Farr has a Ph.D. in Behavioral Neuroscience. Her laboratory studies age-related dementia with a heavy focus on Alzheimer’s disease and risk factors for Alzheimer’s such as traumatic brain injury and diabetes. The lab's work includes testing novel compounds developed to alter biochemical changes in the brain pathways involved in learning and memory that change with aging and disease such as beta amyloid, tau, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. The lab also tests the effects of novel treatments on learning and memory followed by examination of biochemical and genetic alterations.


Colin Flaveny

Colin Flaveny
Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
Colin.Flaveny@health.slu.edu

Yan Gai
Yan Gai
Biomedical Engineering
yan.gai@slu.edu
Koyal Garg

Koyal Garg
Biomedical Engineering
koyal.garg@slu.edu

George Grossberg
George Grossberg
George Grossberg

Psychiatry
School of Medicine
george.grossberg@health.slu.edu

George T. Grossberg  is the Samuel W. Fordyce Professor and Director of Geriatric Psychiatry at Saint Louis University School of Medicine. He completed his medical degree at the St. Louis University School of Medicine in Missouri. His postdoctoral training included an internship at St. John's Mercy Medical Center and a residency in the St. Louis University Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Grossberg and his work have been featured in numerous national publications, including People magazine, Good Housekeeping, USA Today and the New York Times. He has appeared on talk radio and many television programs including 48 Hours, CNN, Lifetime. A Diplomat of the National Board of Medical Examiners and a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Grossberg holds membership in several professional societies. Additionally, he started the first geriatric Ppychiatry program in Missouri, as well as the first Alzheimer’s Disease Community Brain Bank. He is a former president of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry and Past President of the International Psychogeriatric Association (IPA). He has been a leader in developing mental health programs and in treatment and research in geriatrics. Among his many awards, Dr. Grossberg received the Missouri Adult Day Care Association Outstanding Physician Award for supporting programs that allow seniors to live independently or at home with their families and the Fleishman-Hilliard Award for career contributions to geriatrics. He appears regularly on listings of top doctors, including America’s Top Psychiatrists (2008–2019), America’s Top Doctors (2006–2019), Expertscape World Expert in Cholinesterase Inhibitors. (2019) Marquis Who’s Who in the World, Best Doctors in America, and Best Doctors in St. Louis since their inception. 

Dr. Grossberg has edited or written 15 books and published over 500+ articles, chapters, and abstracts in the peer-reviewed literature. In 2007 he published The Essential Herb-Drug-Vitamin Interaction Guide: The Safe Way to Use Medications and Supplements Together and in 2017, Psychiatric Consultation In Long-Term Care. Other recent texts include:  New Horizons in Geriatric Medicine and Delirium-An International Textbook. He currently serves as medical editor of CNS Senior Care and Section Editor for Geriatric Psychiatry for Current Geriatric Reports and Current Psychiatry.  He is on the editorial boards of Demencia Hoy, International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s and the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. He is a consultant in the development of protocols for central nervous system disorders in older patients, and is involved in a variety of basic as well as clinical research projects in the area of dementing disorders, with a focus on behavioral disturbances in Alzheimer’s Disease.


Daniel Hawiger
Daniel Hawiger
Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
School of Medicine
daniel.hawiger@health.slu.edu
 
Jafar Kafaie
Jafar Kafaie
Jafar Kafaie

Neurology
jafar.kafaie@health.slu.edu

Dr. Kafaie is an associate professor in the Department of Neurology.  He treats patients with neuromuscular diseases, including motor neuron disease, muscle diseases, neuromuscular junction disorders, and different forms of peripheral neuropathies. He has appointments with both SSM Health Saint Louis University Hospital and SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children Hospital and takes care of patients both in pediatric and adult clinics. He does electrodiagnostic tests (nerve conduction study and electromyography) on both sites. He is the director of HNF- Designated CMT Center of Excellence in Saint Louis University. He is side director for multiple clinical trials including a large international study on CMT1A. Dr. Kafaie is also director of the adult neurology residency program and is extensively involved in the teaching of residents. 

Dr. Kafaie was born and raised in Tabriz, Iran.  He attended Tehran Medical University and obtained his Ph.D. in molecular biology from McGill University before doing his residency, followed by a fellowship in neuromuscular medicine at Washington University in Saint Louis, MO.

His main research interests are neuromuscular junction disorders (Myasthenia Gravis), motor neuron disease, and neuropathies, including painful neuropathies.


Brenda Kirchhoff
Brenda Kirchhoff
Brenda Kirchhoff

Psychology
College of Arts and Sciences
brenda.kirchhoff@health.slu.edu


Mark Knuepfer
Mark Knuepfer
Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
mark.knuepfer@health.slu.edu
Grant Kolar
Grant Kolar
Pathology
School of Medicine
grant.kolar@health.slu.edu
Sergey Korolev
Sergey Korolev
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
School of Medicine
sergrey.korolev@health.slu.edu
Heather MacArthur
Heather MacArthur
Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
heather.macarthur@health.slu.edu
John Martin
John Martin
John Martin

Surgery
Center for Anatomical Science and Education
School of Medicine
john.martin@health.slu.edu

John Martin is a  professor and director of the Center for Anatomical Science and Education (CASE), Department of Surgery at SLU School of Medicine. He received a M.S. in Anatomy and Ph.D. in Anatomy from the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology at SLU in 1996 and 2001, respectively. He has been a full time faculty member at SLU School of Medicine since 2001. In addition to teaching in the anatomical sciences, primarily in neuroscience and embryology courses, he has mentored many graduate students, covering a wide arrange of research topics including anatomical studies of the reptilian oculomotor and vestibular systems, development of orofacial clefts in mice, and anatomic and genetic analysis of various congenital anomalies in human cadavers. As the director of CASE, he also oversees the anatomy graduate program, the University gift body donation program, the operations of the surgical skills lab Practical Anatomy and Surgical Education (PASE) and the financial operations of SLU School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education (CME) office. He has received awards for his teaching efforts and serves on numerous university committees. He is a member of the American Association of Anatomists, the American Association of Clinical Anatomists and Association of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Neurobiology Chairpersons and is an executive member of the Missouri State Anatomical Board and Saint Louis Anatomical Board.


Philippe Mercier
Philippe Mercier
Philippe Mercier

Neurosurgery
Surgery
philippe.mercier@health.slu.edu

Dr. Philippe Mercier is currently the interim director of the Division of Neurosurgery at Saint Louis University and a practicing neurosurgeon.  He completed his bachelor's degree at the University of Toronto followed by a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology at the University of Saskatchewan with a thesis entitled “Regulation of Heat Shock Transcription Factor 1.”  Following that, he completed M.D. at the University of Saskatchewan. In 2014, he completed his residency in neurosurgery at the University of Calgary achieving Board Certification with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.  It was then he moved to the United States completing a one-year fellowship in pediatric neurosurgery with an emphasis on pediatric tumors and epilepsy at the University of Tennessee associated with St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital. His interests include pediatric and adult brain tumor biology and the brain’s immune response to tumors of the brain.


Henry Nasrallah
Nasrallah
Henry Nasrallah

Professor Emeritus, Saint Louis University
Vice Chair for Faculty Development and Mentorship
Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology and Neuroscience
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
henry.nasrallah@health.slu.edu

Dr. Henry Nasrallah is a widely recognized neuropsychiatrist, educator and researcher. Following his psychiatric residency at the University of Rochester, and neuroscience fellowship at the NIH, he served for 12 years as chair of psychiatry at The Ohio State University and six years at Saint Louis University, as well as associate dean at the University of Cincinnati for four years. He is currently vice chair for faculty development and mentorship, professor of psychiatry, neurology and neuroscience, medical director of the neuropsychiatry program and director of the schizophrenia program in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. 

Dr. Nasrallah’s research focuses on the neurobiology and psychopharmacology of schizophrenia and psychotic mood disorders. He has published 425 scientific  articles, 550 abstracts, 150 editorials, and 12 books. He is editor-in-chief of three  journals (Schizophrenia Research,  Current Psychiatry, and Biomarkers in Neuropsychiatry) and is the co-founder of the Schizophrenia International Research Society (SIRS).   He is a distinguished fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and served as president of the Ohio Psychiatric Physicians Foundation, president of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists, president of the Missouri Psychiatric Association and the executive vice president and scientific director of the CURESZ Foundation.. He has twice received the NAMI Exemplary Psychiatrist Award and was chosen as the U.S.A. Teacher of the Year by the Psychiatric Times. He has received the Golden Apple Teaching Award at four different universities. He has received over 95 research grants and is listed annually in the book “Best Doctors in America.”


Andy Nguyen
Andy Nguyen
Andy Nguyen

Internal Medicine - Geriatrics
School of Medicine
andy.d.nguyen@health.slu.edu

Nguyen's lab studies progranulin – a protein linked to frontotemporal dementia (FTD) – and how its deficiency causes neurodegeneration. It is currently testing strategies (including antisense oligonucleotides) for increasing progranulin levels as potential therapies for progranulin-deficient FTD. It is also investigating progranulin’s structure and function using a variety of molecular and cellular approaches.


Andrew Oberle
Oberle
Andrew Oberle
Development Director
Medical Center Development
andrew.oberle@health.slu.edu
 
In June 2012, while conducting his anthropology thesis research in South Africa, Andrew Oberle was mauled by two adult male chimpanzees and nearly lost his life. He fought to survive in a Johannesburg hospital for two months, kept alive in an induced coma and on a ventilator. After that long fight, he flew home to St. Louis and received extensive care and intensive rehabilitation for his many injuries and amputations at Saint Louis University Hospital and the Rehabilitation Institute of St. Louis.
 
The incredible experience he had during his recovery has led to hisnew life purpose of helping others, serving as the director of development for the Oberle Institute, a holistic trauma program at Saint Louis University that aims to build a community that heals together and assists patients on their journey from surviving to thriving.
 
Oberle shares his story of survival in hopes that he can inspire others as they experience hardship and create a global dialogue about the effects of resilience on a thriving recovery and the importance of community for overcoming adversity. He received his master’s degree in health administration from SLU's College for Public Health and Social Justice and is currently a Ph.D. student in public health studies concentrating in health management and policy. He hopes to prove that the programs  he and his develop are improving the lives of those that experience trauma and the health care financial system.
 
As a member of the Advocacy and Outreach committee, Oberle also hopes to use his experience as a well-connected member of the Saint Louis University and St. Louis communities and patient advocate to ensure the Nasrallah Center for Neuroscience achieves success and makes the greatest possible impact on the people of St. Louis.

Judith Ogilvie
Judith Ogilvie
Judith Ogilvie

Biology
College of Arts and Sciences
judith.ogilvie@slu.edu

The Ogilvie lab takes a multidisciplinary approach to better understand the structure, development and degeneration of the vertebrate retina. Current research is focused in two major areas: primate retinal circuitry and photoreceptor development and degeneration. Website: https://judithogilvie.wixsite.com/mysite


Whitney Postman
Whitney Postman
Whitney Postman

Communication Science and Disorders
Doisy College of Health Sciences
drwhitney.postman@slu.edu

Whitney Postman is a tenure-track assistant professor and director of the Neuro-Rehabilitation of Language Laboratory in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Saint Louis University's Doisy College of Health Sciences. As a proponent of culturally and linguistically competent interdisciplinary research and its potential for optimizing clinical interventions with diverse adult and aging populations, Postman has thus far dedicated her career to integrating the related fields of neuro-imaging, cross-linguistic scholarship and speech-language pathology. Her clinical research investigates neuro-rehabilitation in culturally and linguistically diverse adult and aging populations with neurogenic cognitive-communicative disorders due to stroke, traumatic brain injury or neurodegenerative disease. The communities in which she has been privileged to serve are vulnerable to chronic health disparities in America: minority groups, socio-economically disadvantaged groups, speakers of non-standard varieties of English, and speakers of other languages with low to no proficiency in English. Her research pursues three themes:

 1) Testing the clinical utility of state-of-the-art computer-based cognitive-communicative therapy programs in medically underserved, culturally and linguistically diverse adult and aging populations with neurogenic cognitive-communicative disorders;

2) Tailoring these computer-based cognitive-communicative therapy programs to the specific linguistic and cultural characteristics of these populations by incorporating personally relevant, familiar and functional content;

3) Coupling of these interventions with Ultrasound Visual Feedback for motor-speech function and neuro-modulation (Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic or Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation), and investigating the neural mechanisms underlying rehabilitation of neurogenic cognitive-communicative disorders with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) of overt language production.


Fred Rottnek
Fred Rottnek
Fred Rottnek

Family and Community Medicine
fred.rottnek@health.slu.edu

Dr. Fred Rottnek is a Professor and the Director of Community Medicine at Saint Louis University  School of Medicine and Medical Director of the Physician Assistant Program. He is a graduate of the Saint Louis University School of Medicine and the Master of Arts in Health Care Mission Program at Aquinas Institute of Theology. His clinical practices have included correctional health care, homeless health care, community clinics, and addiction medicine. He teaches in the School of Medicine, the PA Program, the Interprofessional Education Program, and the Center for Health Law Studies. Board-Certified in Family Medicine and Addiction Medicine, he is the medical director for the Assisted Recovery Centers of American (ARCA). He serves on the boards of the Saint Louis Regional Health Commission, Alive and Well Communities, and the ARCHway Institute.  Dr. Rottnek is the program director of the Saint Louis University Addiction Medicine Fellowship.


Daniela Salvemini
 
Daniela Salvemini
Daniela Salvemini
Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
daniela.salvemini@health.slu.edu
 
Daniela Salvemini Ph.D, is professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine. She is also the director of the Henry and Amelia Nasrallah Center for Neuroscience at SLU and a fellow of the Saint Louis Academy of Science.
 

Salvemini received her B.Sc from Kings College in London and her Ph.D. from the University of London under the mentorship of the Nobel Laureate Professor Sir John Vane FRS.

Prior to joining Saint Louis University, she spent 15 years in the private sector prior, where she led drug discovery efforts on anti-inflammatories and analgesics. Her lab is highly translational and uses multidisciplinary approaches to unravel molecular and biochemical signatures of chronic pain to identify and validate novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Her research efforts enabled drug discovery efforts towards the development of novel non-opioid based analgesics for the treatment of chronic pain states.

Salvemini  is also chief scientific advisor and chair of the research advisory board of BioIntervene Inc., a SLU based start-up which she founded in 2014. BioIntervene Inc. is developing novel analgesics based on discoveries made in her lab.

Salvemini’s research achievements are reflected in over 200 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, as well as several awards including the Fellows Awards from the Saint Louis Academy of Science, Outstanding Scientist Award. She is a reviewer for several scientific journals and a grant reviewer for the NIH and several private foundations. Her lab is funded by grants from the NIH, foundations and the private sector.


Rick Samson
Rick Samson
Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
willis.samson@health.slu.edu
 
Fran Sverdrup
Fran Sverdrup
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
School of Medicine
fran.sverdrup@health.slu.edu
Graeme Thomas
Graeme Thomas
Office of Technology Management
graeme.thomas@slu.edu
Travis Threats
Travis Threats
Communication Science and Disorders
travis.threats@health.slu.edu
Carissa van den Berk-Clark
Clarissa van den Berk-Clark
Carissa van den Berk-Clark

Family and Community Medicine
School of Medicine
carissa.vandenberkclark@health.slu.edu

Dr. van den Berk-Clark is a clinical and community social work who focuses on clients and communities with high levels of trauma and substance abuse disorders. Dr. van den Berk-Clark is particularly interested in how trauma affects decision making among individuals in regards to health behaviors, especially substance use and misuse. Along with her interests in building better programs and service delivery systems for trauma-exposed patients, she also works to improve access to care by building health care workforce capacity and collaborating with primary care providers throughout the St. Louis region in SLU's ARCHNet practice based research network.   


John Walker

John Walker
Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
john.walker@health.slu.edu

Thomas Westfall
Thomas Westfall
Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
thomas.c.westfall@slu.edu
Fenglian Xu

Fenglian Xu
Biology
College of Arts and Sciences
fenglian.xu@slu.edu

Patrick Yeung
Patrick Yeung
Instruction-Social Work
patrick.yeung@health.slu.edu
Gina Yosten
Gina Yosten
Gina Yosten

Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
gina.yosten@health.slu.edu

Gina L. C. Yosten, Ph.D., joined the faculty of the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology in 2015, following her Ph.D. and post-doctoral training with Willis K. Samson, Ph.D., D.Sc., and a short fellowship at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Dr. Yosten's work focuses on the role of orphan G protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in the neurobiology of obesity- and diabetes-related complications. In collaboration with Dr. Samson, Dr. Yosten has deorphanized five orphan GPCRs, and is interested in determining the role of those receptors in normal physiology and, importantly, how those receptors can be targeted therapeutically for the treatment of human diseases.


Scott Zahm
Scott Zahm
Scott Zahm

Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
zahmds@slu.edu

Daniel S. Zahm did his early academics in central Pennsylvania (Associates, Liberal Arts, Harrisburg Area Community College, 1970; B.S., Biology, Bloomsburg University, 1977; Ph.D., Anatomy, (the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center of the Pennsylvania State University) and a postdoc at the University of Virginia (1982-5). He joined Saint Louis University in 1985, was promoted to tenured professor in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology (1996) and later moved to the Department of Pharmacological and Physiological Science (2004, now Pharmacology and Physiology). Over 35 years, his laboratory has supported nearly continuously by private foundations and the NIH to use experimental neuroanatomical and behavioral pharmacological methods to address fundamental patterns of organization in the basal forebrain, how forebrain systems contribute to behavioral synthesis and are disrupted by pathology, such as in, e.g., addictions, and what are the vulnerabilities of different forebrain systems to neurodegeneration. Most of the work from the lab was generated independently, but Zahm has also had fruitful collaborations with several domestic and foreign research groups, altogether resulting in 120 publications, including peer-reviewed papers, book chapters and a book. He has served on the editorial boards of four journals, Neuroscience (since 1996), the Journal of Chemical Neuroanatomy (since 2005), Brain Structure & Function (since 2007) and the Journal Comparative Neurology (2004-8; 2012-6) and has reviewed grant applications for domestic, foreign national and private agencies, including the NIH (member, IFCN-1, 1998-02, many ad hoc), National Science Foundation (USA), Israel Science Foundation, Medical Research Council of Canada, McKnight Endowment Fund, French National Research Agency and Wellcome Trust of Great Britain. Three students received a Ph.D. and eight Masters degrees for work done in Zahm’s laboratory and he has mentored eight postdocs and two post-graduate fellows and sat on the committees of many other grad students at SLU and other universities and, since 1985, lectured at SLU in the medical and graduate schools.


 
Jinsong Zhang
Jinsong Zhang
Jinsong Zhang


Pharmacology and Physiology Science
School of Medicine
jinsong.zhang@health.slu.edu

Dr. Jinsong Zhang received his Ph.D. degree in biochemistry and molecular biology from University of Pennsylvania in 1999. He did his doctoral dissertation in the laboratory of Dr. Mitchell A. Lazar, a world-renowned nuclear receptor and circadian rhythm expert. Dr. Zhang subsequently conducted his postdoctoral training at the Rockefeller University with Dr. Robert G. Roeder, the 2003 recipient of the prestigious Albert Lasker Award for his pioneering work in mechanisms of eukaryotic transcription. In 2005, Dr. Zhang became an assistant professor in the Department of Cancer Biology at the University of Cincinnati, and joined Saint Louis University School of Medicine in 2013 as an associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology. Dr. Zhang’s laboratory has three main research directions, including (i) understanding the molecular basis of cancer, especially leukemia, (ii) characterizing new drug targets, with a focus on (a) epigenetic enzymes such as histone-modifying enzymes, (b) transcriptional coregulators such as myeloid translocation genes, and (c) anti-GPCR/inflammatory proteins such as GPS2 (G-protein pathway suppressor 2); (iii) developing new next-generation sequencing technologies, including single-cell RNA-Seq and single-cell ATAC assays. For more information, contact Dr. Zhang at jinsong.zhang@health.slu.edu.


Silviya Zustiak
Sylvia Zustiak
Silviya Zustiak


Biomedical Engineering
Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology
silviya.zustiak@slu.edu

Dr. Silviya Zustiak obtained a B.S./M.S. degree in bioelectrical engineering from the Technical University in Sofia, Bulgaria in 2002 and a Ph.D. in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering from the University of Maryland Baltimore County in 2009. She spent three years at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland conducting postdoctoral research in biophysics. In 2011 she received the NIH Fellows Award for Research Excellence for her work on transport in complex media. Dr. Zustiak joined the Biomedical Engineering Department at Saint Louis University (SLU) in January 2013. At SLU she was awarded the Outstanding Parks Graduate Faculty Award in 2015 and the SLU Scholarly Works Award for a Junior Faculty in 2017. She is a co-director for the Institute of Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation and on the Executive Leadership Committee for the Henry and Amelia Nasrallah Center for Neuroscience at SLU.  Dr. Zustiak is a frequent reviewer for NIH and National Science Foundation (NSF) review panels, multiple scientific journals and is on the Editorial board for Frontiers in Biotechnology and Bioengineering and Pharmaceuticals journals.

Dr. Zustiak’s research is highly multidisciplinary, merging the fields of engineering, materials science, biophysics, and biology. Her research is focused on hydrogel biomaterials and tissue engineering, with emphasis on developing novel biomaterials as drug screening platforms and delivery devices for biologics, elucidating matrix structure-property relationships as well as cell-matrix interactions. Her work has resulted in over 50 peer-reviewed publications, over 200 presentations at regional and national conferences and multiple patent applications.