Learning Communities

About half of Saint Louis University freshmen find their perfect level of social and academic support in one of our nine on-campus learning communities.

Learning Community members

Students in learning communities live in the same residence hall and take classes that are centered around a particular major or theme. Living in a learning community is a great way to meet people and make friends who have similar interests. Plus, studies show that students are more successful when their academic experiences are integrated with other aspects of their lives.

Our faculty members are closely involved with each learning community, so you’ll hold deeper conversations about content, learn outside of the classroom, and open doors to more research, internship and mentor opportunities.

Why Join a Learning Community?

  • Connect with students with similar academic and personal goals.
  • Explore career options.
  • Get connected to campus life and University resources.
  • Explore St. Louis through field trips.
  • Volunteer through community service projects.
  • Access peer mentoring and/or tutoring.
  • Explore leadership development opportunities.

Choose Your Community

Diversity and Global Citizenship Learning Community

Located in Grand Hall, SLU's Diversity and Global Citizenship Learning Community explores what it means to live in a global society. Students living in this community further their knowledge of diverse peoples, communities, and societies and the human experience on a local and global scale.

This community is open to all majors, but it is specifically designed for students majoring in African American studies, American studies, anthropology, communication, criminal justice, economics, environmental studies, international studies, modern and classical languages, political science, social work, sociology or women's studies.

Associated Classes for 2016-17

Fall
1. CMM 1300: Freshman Seminar
2. POLS 1510: Politics of the Developing World OR
SOC 1180: World Geography 

Spring
AAM2500/CMM2300 Intergroup Dialogue OR
SOC 2080: Urban Issues: Poverty and Unemployment

Faculty Associates

Dr. Karla Scott is the assistant dean for diversity and inclusion, College of Arts and Sciences and the Department Chair for African American Studies. She has been instrumental in the development of the Saint Louis University Intergroup Dialogue program.

Dr. J.D. Bowen is an associate professor of political science who researches Latin American politics, race and ethnicity, U.S. foreign policy (particularly in Latin America) and elite politics. He uses this research to help lead our Diversity and Global Citizenship trip to Quito, Ecuador in May of each year. 

 

Engineering and Innovation Learning Community: Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology

Located in Grand Hall, SLU’s Engineering and Innovation Learning Community is a group of scholars who share a commitment to the fields of engineering, physics, and flight science. You’ll enjoy the support of your peers and of Parks College faculty with similar academic interests.

While all Parks College students are welcome, the community is designed mainly for engineering majors.

“The best part of living in the Engineering Learning Community is the ability to study together, then go to dinner. Your friends are built-in and living with you so they remind you to work hard and to have fun.” — Charlie  

Associated Classes for 2016-17

Fall
1. CHEM1075: General chemistry I lab
2. UNIV1010: University 101
3. BME 100: BME Orientation OR
ASCI 1010: Aviation Orientation OR
CVNG 1010: Intro Civil Engineering
4. Math course (various levels)

Spring
PHYS 1610: Engineering Physics

Faculty Associate

Michelle Sabick is the dean of Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology. Previously, Dr. Sabick served as the department chair for biomedical engineering. Throughout her career, Dr. Sabick has been passionate about improving the ways that universities deliver engineering education to students.

Ethical Leaders in Business Learning Community: John Cook School of Business

Located in Grand Hall, SLU’s Ethical Leaders in Business Learning Community focuses on the relationship between business leadership and the Jesuit pursuit of forming men and women for others. Members are also encouraged to participate in the business service leadership certificate program through the business school. 

The Ethical Leaders in Business Learning Community is open to students in all majors within the John Cook School of Business, including deciding students within the school. 

“One of my favorite things about the Ethical Leaders in Business Learning Community is all the connections you will make with great people on the floor who you will go to school with for the next four years.” — Alex

Associated Classes for 2016-17

Fall
BIZ 1000: Business Foundations
THEO 1000: Theological Foundations

Spring
ECON 1900: Principles of Economics

Faculty Associate

Dr. Rob Boyle is an assistant dean of administration and an assistant professor of management in the John Cook School of Business. Dr. Boyle is also a recording artist and he uses his business degree to manage and market his own music company. He has been with the learning community program since its formation, ten years ago.

Faith and Formation Learning Community

New for the 2017-18 academic year, this learning community engages in a collaborative relationship with the Catholic Studies program and offers interested students opportunities to explore the history and mission of the Society of Jesus and the traditions underlying Saint Louis University as a Catholic, Jesuit institution. Along with shared course work, the program will offer you a variety of social and spiritual activities to encourage your personal and spiritual growth.

Faculty Associate

Fr. David Vincent Meconi, S.J., D.Phil. (Oxon.) is an associate professor of historical theology and the director of the Edmund Campion Catholic Studies Center. He serves on boards of the St. Benedict Forum at Hope College in Holland, MI as well as on the ecclesiastical board of Boston College. Fr. Meconi assisted in the creation of this learning community in 2016.

Health Sciences Learning Community: Doisy College of Health Sciences/School of Nursing

Located in Reinert Hall, SLU’s Health Sciences Learning Community lets you take courses and live with other majors in the School of Nursing and Doisy College of Health Sciences. You'll also have opportunities to explore the health field with the help of faculty and staff from across campus or even schedule a shadowing experience at SSM Health SLU Hospital.

The Health Sciences Learning Community is designed specifically for students in the School of Nursing and Doisy College of Health Sciences.

“The best part about the Health Sciences Learning Community is living with other students taking similar, if not the exact same, courses as me. It really helped me when studying for exams, and it was really easy to get help when things didn’t make sense in class.” — Matt    

Associated Classes for 2016-17

PT and AT Fall

IPE 1100: Introduction to Interprofessional Health
BIOL 1100: Introduction to Biology
CHEM 1083: Principles of Chemistry I

PT and AT Spring

THEO 1000: Introduction to Theological Studies
DPT 1212: Student Development II

Health Sciences Fall

CHEM 1110: General Chemistry I
UNIV 1010: University 101

Health Sciences Spring

THEO 1000: Theological Foundations
PSY 1010: General Psychology

Nursing Fall

NURS 1400: Introduction to Nursing
PSY 1010: Introduction to Psychology
CHEM 1083: Principles of Chemistry I

Nursing Spring

THEO 1000: Theological Foundations
ANAT 1000: Basic Human Anatomy
HCE 2010: Foundations of Health Care Ethics

Occupational Therapy Fall

IPE 1100: Introduction to InterProfessional Health Care
BIOL 1100: Introduction to Biology

Occupational Therapy Spring

ANAT 1000: Basic Human Anatomy
OCS 1010: Intro to Occupational Science and Therapy

 Faculty Associate

Dr. Ginge Kettenbach is an associate professor in the Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training. Dr. Kettenbach has several publications and has presented nationally and internationally. In 2006, she received the John K. DiTiberio Award for Outstanding Dedication to the Education and Formation of Students as Professionals. 

Honors Learning Community

Located in Spring Hall, SLU’s Honors Learning Community is open to students of all majors who have been admitted to the University Honors Program. Students take on challenges and connect with SLU's scholarly community, while exemplifying the Jesuit commitment to service. You’ll also receive personalized advising and support, and pursue studies that focus on your individual academic and career interests.

“The Honors Learning Community is unique because we are made up of people with entirely different interests. This diversity assists in forming a tight-knit community unlike any other on campus.” — Brooke

Associated Classes for 2016-17

First-Year Fall Semester
1. HR 1900: Crossroads: An Intro to Honors
2. PHIL 1050: Intro to Philosophy: Self and Reality OR
THEO 1000: Theological Foundations

First-Year Spring Semester
An Honors cross-listed course

Second-Year Fall Semester
An Honors cross-listed course OR 
HR: 4810: Honors Teaching Assistantship

Second-Year Spring Semester
HR 4910: Honors Internship OR
HR 4840 Honors Research OR
HR 4850: International Partnership

Faculty Associate

Dr. Scott Berman is an associate professor of philosophy. He specializes in ancient Greek philosophy and contemporary metaphysics. Dr. Berman has published many works on the metaphysical theories of Plato and Aristotle as they relate to the contemporary discussions in metaphysics on the nature of universals and particulars. 

Leadership for Social Change Learning Community

Located in Spring Hall, SLU’s Leadership for Social Change Learning Community will challenge you to learn about social advocacy through relationship building, creative action and the social sciences. This community is a great way to build significant relationships, meet passionate faculty and become active in the city of St. Louis.

This community is open to all majors, but it is specifically designed for students majoring in American studies, Anthropology, art history, communication, education, emergency management, English, foreign language, health management, music, philosophy, psychology, public health, sociology, studio art, theatre and theology. 

 "The best part of living in the Leadership for Social Change Learning Community is being in a community of students who are all passionate about many different topics and engaging in very stimulating discussions with them.” — Darnell

Associated Classes for 2016-17

First-Year Fall Semester
PSY 1010: General Psychology
FPA 1100: The Arts and Social Change

First-Year Spring Semester
PSY 2000/3000: Positive Psychology

Second-Year Fall Semester
SOC 1500: The Urban Community: Race, Class and Spatial Justice

Second-Year Spring Semester
FPA 2000: Social Practice in the Arts

Faculty Associate

Dr. Janet Keubli is an associate professor of psychology. She studies emotional development, the role of family discourse processes in socialization, children’s health/safety socialization and the psychology of parenting. Her teaching interests include emotional and social development and the socialization of emotion and self-understanding and the psychology of gender. 

Life Sciences Learning Community

Located in Reinert Hall, SLU’s Life Sciences Learning Community can help you develop and explore your interests within medical sciences, public health, sustainability and technology in science. One of the program’s main goals is to provide the optimal environment for studying, learning and building community with other science and pre-med students.

SLU’s Life Sciences Learning Community is designed for all majors who are considering a pre-medical track.

“When I first came to college, I had a very real fear that I would have difficulty making friends or feel severe loneliness from missing all my loved ones at home. However, I feel that the Life Sciences Learning Community has become a second home to me because of all the friends I've gotten and experiences I've had.” — Kevin

Associated Classes for 2016-17

General Sections Fall

BIOL 1240: Principles of Biology I
CHEM 1110: General Chemistry I Lecture
UNIV 1010: University 101
SOC 1120: Intro to Sociology: Diversity and Health Emphasis

General Sections Spring

BIO 1260: Principles of Biology II
CHEM 1120: General Chemistry II Lecture
PUBH 2100: Intro Global Public Health OR
IPE 1100: Introduction to Interprofessional Health Care


Pre-Med Scholars Section Fall

BIOL 1240: Principles of Biology I
CHEM 1110: General Chemistry I
UNIV 1010: University 101
THEO 1000: Theological Foundations


Pre-Med Scholars Section Spring

BIO 1260: Principles of Biology II
CHEM 1120: General Chemistry II
PPHS 1020 : Med Scholars Intro to Health

 Faculty Associate

Dr. Eva Gonzales is an assistant professor of biology. She studies plant evolutionary ecology and its implications for conservation and restoration. She focuses on questions addressing the role of evolutionary history and anthropogenic disturbance in shaping genetic variation in native species with economic importance and species performing important ecosystem services.

Micah Program: Service and Faith

Located in Marguerite Hall, the Micah Program brings together faith, service, community and academics. Working among people from many racial and ethnic backgrounds living in neighborhoods near the University, students perform three hours of service a week at 16 model sites. Our primary focus is on children, helping them to find their talents, imagine bright futures and do well in school. First-year Micahs also take several core courses together in small discussion sections. In the fall, we explore ideals of social justice and in the spring, the history and promise of the ethnic groups that we serve. During a weekly community hour, students gather in small groups to support one another, reflect on their experiences in class and at service, and share their faith. Many older students stay involved throughout their college careers, serving as mentors, leading retreats and small-group gatherings, and organizing our large-group service days and social events. The program welcomes students of all faiths and majors. It offers a minor in Urban Poverty Studies.

“I love living in the Micah community because I love the four pillars that make it up – community, faith, service, and academics. Being able to live in a community where you stand with and for others by your service, exploring your faith and that of your peers, has a big impact on your growth as a person. It’s so cool to be able to continue the conversations that happen in the classroom when you go back to the residence hall.”  -Shalini Raichur, Public Health 2019

 Learn more about the Micah Program 

Associated Classes for 2016-17

Fall Semester
Choose one of the following linked pairs:

PHIL 1050: Introduction to Philosophy: Self and Reality
AND
THEO 1000: Theological Foundations
OR
PHIL 1050: Introduction to Philosophy: Self and Reality
AND
ENGL 1900: Advanced Strategies of Rhetoric and Research

Spring Semester
Choose one or more of the following courses:
AAM 2010-01/01H: Contemporary Black America
ASTD 2700: Gender, Race, and Social Justice
ASTD 3200-01/01H: The Urban Crisis
LAS 3000-01/01H: Introduction to Latin American Studies
ENGL 1900: Advanced Strategies of Rhetoric and Research

Faculty Associate

Dr. Donald Stump has directed the Micah Program since its founding in 1997. While in the Provost’s office in 2007-8, he worked with Student Development to create a Learning Community program for the entire University. He is a professor of English and lives in the Shaw neighborhood, where the Micah Program first focused its service and where it is still engaged.

How to Join a Learning Community

It’s easy to apply to take part in a learning community at SLU.

Step 1: Review the list of learning communities, and select the community or communities for which you want to apply. Don’t forget to look at the requirements for each learning community since some require a specific major or a supplemental application.

Step 2: Apply for your learning community through the housing contract. To learn more about how to sign up for housing, click here.

Step 3: Confirm your Learning Community courses.  You will be registered for these courses prior to SLU101 summer orientation and will meet with an adviser then to make sure that they fit your schedule and major.