Skip to main content
MenuSearch & Directory

Occupational Therapy Program

Undergraduate Program Handbook Graduate Program Handbook

Saint Louis University's occupational science and occupational therapy program offers a five-year, freshman-entry master’s program. Students earn a Bachelor of Science in Occupational Science (B.S.O.S.) degree after completing four years, including one summer, and then a Master of Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.) degree after successfully completing an additional post-baccalaureate year. Students may also enter the program as transfer students or as post-baccalaureates. The occupational science and occupational therapy program has a focus on interprofessional care and occupational justice.

Occupational therapists work with people of all ages across the entire lifespan to improve the quality of their everyday lives and allow people to live life to its fullest. For an occupational therapist, this means focusing on a person’s “occupations,” including anything a person wants, needs or has to do. Occupational therapists practice in various settings, ranging from the traditional (schools, hospitals, home health, skilled nursing facilities, etc.) to the non-traditional (prisons, homeless shelters, primary care clinics, etc.). Occupational therapists partner with the client to plan interventions that promote health, focusing on important and meaningful activities to the individual or the community.

The post-professional doctorate program (O.T.D.) is available for individuals with a bachelor’s or master’s degree in occupational therapy interested in continuing their education.

Saint Louis University Occupational Therapy Program Cost of Attendance

Curriculum Overview

The occupational therapy program at Saint Louis University provides students with the coursework, faculty and resources to graduate as competent and caring health care professionals. Highlights of SLU's program include: 

  • Undergraduate students in the occupational science program have a seamless, direct entry to the graduate-level occupational therapy master's program if all of the undergraduate program's academic and professional behavior requirements are successfully completed.
  • The curriculum is divided into the pre-professional (years 1-3) and professional (years 4-5) phases. Once accepted, a student will progress through the entire program without the need for re-applying or taking a graduate entrance exam, provided the student meets the program's academic and professional behavior standards.
  • Applied experiences are an integral and complementary part of the occupational therapy curriculum. Occupational science and occupational therapy students participate in several levels of clinical experiences and fieldwork, beginning in year 3 and culminating in completing two 12-week full-time fieldwork experiences in various settings beginning in the spring semester of year 5.
  • Upon graduation with the M.O.T. degree, students must pass the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy examination to obtain a license to practice occupational therapy.
  • The curriculum is carefully planned to form students holistically and includes a liberal arts education in the Jesuit tradition with an emphasis on interprofessional health collaboration, a foundation in occupational science, occupational therapy coursework and field experiences in research and service.
  • Students have the opportunity to study abroad in the spring semester of their sophomore year.
  • The undergraduate program (B.S.O.S.) is one of a select few U.S. programs focused on the discipline of occupational science — the underpinnings of the occupational therapy profession.
  • Students are assigned to a faculty mentor who supports the student's professional development.
  • Undergraduate students have the option to conduct research and produce projects/papers acceptable for publication and presentation at professional conferences.

Clinical and Research Opportunities

Clinical fieldwork is an integral and complementary part of the occupational therapy curriculum. Through classroom and fieldwork experiences, students develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors that allow for occupation-centered and evidence-driven occupational therapy practice. Occupational science and occupational therapy students participate in several levels of clinical experiences and fieldwork.

Applied Community Service Experiences take place during year 3 and are aligned with students' engagement in occupational science courses. Students are expected to complete a minimum of 20 hours of experience throughout the fall and spring semesters.

Level I Fieldwork is the applied experience coordinated with coursework during the fall and spring semesters of year (professional year 1) 4 and the fall semester of year 5 (professional year 2). Level I Fieldwork provides occupational therapy students with opportunities to develop professional behaviors, establish relationships with clients/patients and staff, identify the role of occupational therapy in various treatment settings, formulate goals and objectives in the therapeutic process, and demonstrate emerging occupational therapy skills. Course instructors design assignments to be completed during Level I Fieldwork to assist students with meeting the learning objectives of the fieldwork experience while also addressing the course's learning objectives.

Level II Fieldwork occurs January through June of year 5. Level II Fieldwork is the in-depth practical experience in the delivery of occupational therapy services that focuses on the promotion of clinical reasoning and reflective practice skills, the application of the treatment process, including evaluation, intervention, and discharge, and professional behavior development with the ultimate goal of preparing our graduates for entry-level occupational therapy practice. Level II Fieldwork can take place in either traditional or emerging practice settings.

Students complete two 12-week Level II Fieldwork experiences following the successful completion of all didactic coursework. Fieldwork sites and the academic program collaboratively establish fieldwork objectives for these experiences. During each Level II Fieldwork experience, students participate in weekly assignments to maintain close contact with the academic program, track the progress of learning and skill development, and assist with the achievement of Level II Fieldwork learning objectives. The M.O.T. program is affiliated with approximately 300 fieldwork sites across the United States.

Regulations require all students to complete a criminal background check and a drug test at least once during the program; either or both may be repeated as agency requirements demand. Positive results from the criminal background check or drug tests may result in ineligibility to graduate from the program. A felony conviction may affect a graduate’s professional certification and licensure eligibility.

Research

Occupational therapy students who choose to pursue a master's project are matched with a faculty member who mentors their development of a comprehensive project closely associated with the faculty member's scholarship. Through this process and concurrently applied research seminars, you’ll have opportunities to understand the research process in a practice setting or academic environment.

Careers

Upon completing an accredited educational program and earning a master’s degree or entry-level clinical doctorate degree in occupational therapy, graduates must successfully pass the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) examination. After successfully passing the exam, students will receive the designation of OTR: occupational therapist, registered.

In most states, practitioners must hold a current license or limited permit to work. Typically, therapists must fulfill continuing education requirements to maintain certification and/or licensure.

Employment of occupational therapists is expected to increase by 18% between 2018 and 2028, much faster than the average occupation, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

About half of occupational therapists work in occupational therapy offices or in hospitals. Others work in schools, nursing homes and home health services. Additional opportunities include consultation to industry, community settings, teaching and research. The salary of an occupational therapist varies based upon geographic location, years of experience and type of employment. The 2020 median annual salary for an occupational therapist was $87,840, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Admission Requirements

Freshman Applicants

  • Required minimum high school GPA of 3.20 on a 4.00 scale.
  • Required minimum of one year of Biology and one year of Chemistry (or equivalent coursework).

Standardized test scores are optional. When evaluating whether to apply test-optional or with a test score, applicants should note that students accepted in previous years had an average composite 26 ACT or an average total 1230 SAT.

High school seniors applying for admission are reviewed on an individual basis.

Strong applicants will have: 

  • Four years of science, including Biology, Chemistry, Physics and/or Anatomy 
  • Four years of English 
  • Four years Math 
  • Activities demonstrating leadership and community service 
  • An interest in the profession of Occupational Therapy as demonstrated through observation, school activities, volunteer experiences, or personal experiences 

The application deadline is Dec. 1. Late applications are not considered. Admission decisions will be made Feb. 1.

Transfer Applicants

General Information

  • The Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy program at Saint Louis University admits both internal and external transfer students (students currently enrolled in another program at SLU or students enrolled at another college or university). The number of students admitted varies and is based on the available space in the respective cohort. A change of major status and program entry occurs the next applicable Fall or Spring semester following acceptance.
  • Level of entry (freshman, sophomore, junior) is based on the number of prerequisite course(s) completed (see curriculum roadmap).
    • Students should apply by March 15 for fall semester entry
    • Students should apply by Oct. 15 for spring semester entry

Admission Criteria

  • Prerequisite Coursework
    • Students must have an earned cumulative 3.2 GPA for all prior coursework.
    • Per university policy, courses with grades of C or above may be eligible for transfer credit.
    • All prerequisite courses must have been completed within the last 5 years.
    • It is recommended that science courses be taken at a four-year university; however, community college coursework may be accepted.
    • Science courses taken online are not accepted.
    • In-progress coursework must be completed by the semester of entry.
  • Experience in the profession

    • Strong candidates will document 10-15 hours of experience in a variety of Occupational Therapy practice settings, including hospitals, nursing homes, schools, or community organizations. Alternative ideas include discussions with therapists, conversations/relationships with people with disabilities or their families, volunteerism, or employment. Record your experiences in the Journal of Experience, listing the date, amount of time, site, and summary of activities.
  • Personal Essay
    • Students submit an essay discussing the reasons for pursuing a career in Occupational Therapy. The essay should integrate an understanding/definition of the profession, experiences in the profession, and an assessment of personal qualities/competence for the study and practice as a clinician. The essay will be evaluated on content, writing style, and a maximum length of 500 words.

Initial Transfer Admission Steps

  • Locate and become familiar with the program’s website and roadmap. Knowledge of the program and transfer criteria prior to beginning the process will result in subsequent productive discussion.
  • Current SLU students interested in transferring to the program should discuss their plans with their current academic advisor. Following that discussion, the student will be referred to the OT Program Director of Undergraduate Education to review coursework and eligibility further.
  • External students should contact the Transfer Admissions Office at or via telephone at 314-977-2500. A transfer advisor will review the coursework and the student’s eligibility for the program. They will also discuss admission procedures to the University. Following that discussion, the student will be referred to the OT Program Director of Undergraduate Education to review coursework and eligibility further.
  • External applicants submit official transcripts either electronically or via traditional mail to the following address:
    • Saint Louis University, Office of Admission, DuBourg Hall, room 119
      One North Grand Boulevard, St. Louis, MO  63103
  • Transferology is a helpful resource to determine how coursework from other colleges/universities may transfer toward the Program.

Completing the Transfer Admission Process

Upon completion of the above steps:

  • The Journal of Experiences and personal essay should be submitted via email to ot@slu.edu. Students desiring a fall semester entry must submit the two documents no later than March 15. Students wanting a spring semester entry must submit the two documents no later than Oct. 15.
  • To complete the interview process, an interview may be requested by the Departmental Admissions Committee.

Post-Baccalaureate

The program reserves up to 15 seats for qualified post-baccalaureate students, with entry beginning in mid-May with the start of Gross Anatomy.

Post-baccalaureate applicants to the OT program are required to have completed eight prerequisite courses (listed below), earning a minimum cumulative 3.20 GPA:

  • Biology with lab (4 credits)
  • Chemistry with lab (4 credits)
  • Basic anatomy (3 credits)
  • Physiology (3 credits)
  • Lifespan human development (3 credits)
  • Abnormal psychology (3 credits)
  • Research methods (3 credits)
  • Medical terminology (1-3 credits)
    • Completion of the eight prerequisite courses with a minimum of 3.20 GPA
    • A minimum of 20 hours of volunteering or observation experience with occupational therapists (OT) or occupational therapy assistants (OTA)

All eight prerequisite courses must have been completed within the last five years. Grades below a C will not be accepted. It is recommended that science courses be taken at a four-year university, but community college coursework will be accepted. Science courses taken online will not be accepted. Occupational therapy coursework taken elsewhere will not be accepted. Admitted students must be physically present on campus for the start of Gross Anatomy in mid-May (the exact date varies each year, students will be informed as soon as the start date is known).

Students fulfilling any prerequisite courses in the spring term before our program begins may be conditionally accepted into the program on the agreement that they will complete those prerequisites with a grade of C or higher before the start of Gross Anatomy.

Applications must be completed and transcripts submitted through the Centralized Application Service for Occupational Therapy system by the application deadline of Jan. 22. Transcripts will not be accepted by SLU.

Application Requirements

Freshman

Freshmen or undergraduate transfer applicants from the U.S. or abroad can begin the application process online through the SLU Admission page. SLU also accepts the Common App.

Post-Baccalaureate

Apply through the Centralized Application Service for Occupational Therapy (OTCAS). The OTCAS is a centralized service that enables prospective occupational therapy students to submit all application materials electronically. Application materials that must be submitted to OTCAS include:

  • Official transcripts
  • Two professional letters of reference
  • Personal essay up to 500 words, which should be a discussion of experiences in the field and reasons why you are interested in pursuing a degree in occupational therapy

Post-Baccalaureate International Students

All admission policies and requirements for domestic students apply to international students along with the following:

  • Demonstrate English Language Proficiency
  • Proof of financial support must include:
    • A letter of financial support from the person(s) or sponsoring agency funding the time at Saint Louis University
    • A letter from the sponsor's bank verifying that the funds are available and will be so for the duration of study at the University
  • Academic records, in English translation, of students who have undertaken postsecondary studies outside the United States must include the courses taken and/or lectures attended, practical laboratory work, the maximum and minimum grades attainable, the grades earned or the results of all end-of-term examinations, and any honors or degrees received. WES and ECE transcripts are accepted.

Post-Baccalaureate Deadline

Applications for admission to the MOT program must be submitted through OTCAS beginning Sept. 1 and ending Jan. 22. Interviews will be conducted throughout February and all final decisions will be made and communicated by March 1.

Scholarships and Financial Aid

There are two principal ways to help finance a Saint Louis University education:

  • Scholarships: Awarded based on academic achievement, service, leadership and financial need. In addition to University scholarships, the Doisy College of Health Sciences offers a scholarship to sophomores, juniors, seniors and graduate students.
  • Financial Aid: Provided in the form of grants and loans, some of which require repayment.

For priority consideration for merit-based scholarships, applicants should apply for admission by Dec. 1 and complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 1.

For more information, see the Doisy College Scholarship page.

Accreditation  

This program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education, (ACOTE), an Associated Advisory Council of the Executive Board of the American Occupational Therapy Association, (AOTA).
American Occupational Therapy Association, (AOTA)
6116 Executive Boulevard
Suite 200    
North Bethesda, MD 20852-4929
301-652-2682
http://www.aota.org

For more information about SLU's occupational therapy program outcomes, matriculation rate, graduation rate, certification exam pass rate and employment rate, please see the program outcomes document.

View Program Outcomes (PDF)

The total number of graduates from the Saint Louis University Master of Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.) program during the three-year period of 2019-2021 was 167, with an overall graduation rate of 97.1%.

Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapist, administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successfully passing the exam, students will receive the designation of OTR or occupational therapist, registered. In addition, most states require licensure to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT certification examination. A felony conviction may affect a graduate's ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure.

Occupational Therapy NBCOT Pass Rates

Bachelor of Science in Occupational Science

  1. Graduates will be able to describe the scope of the discipline of occupational science.
  2. Graduates will be able to apply occupational science knowledge in practice.
  3. Graduates will be able to describe the relationship between situational factors and opportunities for occupational engagement, with an emphasis on identifying injustices.
  4. Graduates will be able to analyze disciplinary concepts of humans as occupational beings.
  5. Graduates will be able to employ discipline-specific methods of scholarly and clinical inquiry.

Master of Occupational Therapy

  1. Graduates will be able to apply theories that underlie the practice of occupational therapy.
  2. Graduates will be able to demonstrate skills in assessment and intervention practice in the implementation of occupational therapy with clients across the lifespan.
  3. Graduates will be able to demonstrate skills in research designs.
  4. Graduates will be able to effectively interact through written communication in a professionally acceptable manner.
  5. Graduates will be able to construct a professional sense of self as an occupational therapist.
Foundation
ANAT 1000Basic Human Anatomy3
BIOL 1240
BIOL 1245
General Biology: Information Flow and Evolution
and Principles of Biology I Laboratory
4
CHEM 1080
CHEM 1085
Principles of Chemistry 1 Lecture
and Principles of Chemistry 1 Lab (satisfies CORE 3800)
4
CORE 1200Eloquentia Perfecta 2: Oral and Visual Communication3
CORE 1500Cura Personalis 1: Self in Community1
CORE 1600Ultimate Questions: Theology3
CORE 1700Ultimate Questions: Philosophy3
CORE 2500Cura Personalis 2: Self in Contemplation0
CORE 2800Eloquentia Perfecta 3: Creative Expression3
CORE 3400Ways of Thinking: Aesthetics, History, and Culture3
CORE 3500Cura Personalis 3: Self in the World1
ENGL 1900Advanced Strategies of Rhetoric and Research (satisfies CORE 1900)3
HCE3XXX/4XXXHealth Care Ethics Elective3
HSCI 2200Medical Terminology3
HSCI 2500Human Development across the Lifespan3
IPE 2100Interprofessional Collaboration and Healthcare in Global Context3
IPE 4200Applied Decision-Making in Interprofessional Practice3
IPE 4900Interprofessional Community Practicum (satisfies CORE 4000)2
ORES 2320Interprofessional Health Outcomes Research2
PHIL 2050Ethics3
or HCE 2010 Foundations in Clinical Health Care Ethics
PPY 2540Human Physiology4
PSY 1010General Psychology (satisfies CORE 3600)3
PSY3460Abnormal Psychology3
PSY 3XXXPsychology Elective
STAT 1300Elementary Statistics with Computers (satisfies CORE 3200)3
Required for B.S. in Occupational Science
OCS 1000Seminar in OT Practice2
OCS 1010Introduction to Occupational Science and Therapy (satisfies CORE 1000)2
OCS 3120The Study of Occupation3
OCS 3220Contexts of Occupation3
OCS 3320Development of Humans as Occupational Beings3
OCS 3520Personal and Community Wellness3
OCS 3720Critical Perspectives of Culture, Occupation, & Justice3
OCS 4620Clinical Conditions and Phenomenology3
Required for Master's of Occupational Therapy
ANAT 4000Human Gross Anatomy6
MOT 5020Professional Development I1
MOT 5030Professional Development II1
MOT 5040Professional Development III1
MOT 5150Kinesiology3
MOT 5170Neuroscience in Occupational Therapy4
MOT 5250Policy & Administration2
MOT 5260Problem-Based Learning in Occupational Therapy2
MOT 5300Fundamentals of OT Practice3
MOT 5350Theoretical Foundations of Occupational Therapy3
MOT 5400Occupational Therapy for Adults with Physical Dysfunction4
MOT 5410Occupational Therapy in Mental Health3
MOT 5450Occupational Performance & Assessment of Children and Youth3
MOT 5460Occupational Therapy with Aging Adults3
MOT 5480Occupational Therapy & Upper Extremity Rehabilitation2
MOT 5490Applied Research I1
MOT 5500Applied Research II1
MOT 5550Occupational Therapy for Adults with Neurological Dysfunction3
MOT 5560Occupational Therapy and Community Practice3
MOT 5600Occupational Therapy with Infants and Children4
MOT 5650Applied Research III1
MOT 5700Advanced Fieldwork I6
MOT 5750Advanced Fieldwork II (repeatable for up to 6 credits)3
MOT 5660Applied Research IV (optional 1-6 credits)1-6
Total Credits155-160

Non-Course Requirements

Upon completion of all requirements, students receive the Master’s in Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.) degree and are eligible to sit for the national certification examination administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). In addition to passing the national exam, most states require licensure in order to practice.

Note: All Level II Fieldwork must be complete within 18 months following completion of academic preparation.

Undergraduate Continuation Standards

The required GPA minimum for freshmen is 2.70, for sophomores is 2.80 and for juniors is 2.90. 

Graduate/Professional Continuation Standards

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.00 in all graduate/professional courses.

Roadmaps are recommended semester-by-semester plans of study for programs and assume full-time enrollment unless otherwise noted.  

Courses and milestones designated as critical (marked with !) must be completed in the semester listed to ensure a timely graduation. Transfer credit may change the roadmap.

This roadmap should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. All students are encouraged to meet with their advisor/mentor each semester. Requirements, course availability and sequencing are subject to change.

Master of Occupational Therapy (B.S.O.S./M.O.T.) Direct Entry

Plan of Study Grid
Year One
FallCredits
BIOL 1240
BIOL 1245
General Biology: Information Flow and Evolution
and Principles of Biology I Laboratory
4
CORE 1500 Cura Personalis 1: Self in Community 1
CORE 1700 Ultimate Questions: Philosophy 3
ENGL 1900 Advanced Strategies of Rhetoric and Research (satisfies CORE 1900) 3
OCS 1000 Seminar in OT Practice (satisfies CORE 1000) 2
PSY 1010 General Psychology (satisfies CORE 3600) 3
 Credits16
Spring
ANAT 1000 Basic Human Anatomy 3
CORE 3400 Ways of Thinking: Aesthetics, History, and Culture 3
HSCI 2500 Human Development across the Lifespan 3
IPE 2100 Interprofessional Collaboration and Healthcare in Global Context 3
PSY3XXX/4XXXPsychology Elective 3
 Credits15
Year Two
Fall
CHEM 1080
CHEM 1085
Principles of Chemistry 1 Lecture
and Principles of Chemistry 1 Lab (satisfies CORE 3800)
4
OCS 1010 Introduction to Occupational Science and Therapy (satisfies CORE 3500) 2
ORES 2320 Interprofessional Health Outcomes Research 2
PSY 3460 Abnormal Psychology 3
STAT 1300 Elementary Statistics with Computers (satisfies CORE 3200) 3
 Credits14
Spring
Participation in Study Abroad Optional  
CORE 1200 Eloquentia Perfecta 2: Oral and Visual Communication 3
CORE 1600 Ultimate Questions: Theology 3
CORE 2800 Eloquentia Perfecta 3: Creative Expression 3
HSCI 2200 Medical Terminology 3
PHIL 2050
or HCE 2010
Ethics
or Foundations in Clinical Health Care Ethics
3
 Credits15
Year Three
Fall
IPE 4200 Applied Decision-Making in Interprofessional Practice 3
OCS 3120 The Study of Occupation 3
OCS 3220 Contexts of Occupation 3
OCS 3320 Development of Humans as Occupational Beings 3
PPY 2540 Human Physiology 4
 Credits16
Spring
CORE 3500 Cura Personalis 3: Self in the World 1
HCE 3XXXHealth Care Ethics Elective 3
IPE 4900 Interprofessional Community Practicum (satisfies CORE 4000) 2
OCS 3520 Personal and Community Wellness 3
OCS 3720 Critical Perspectives of Culture, Occupation, & Justice 3
OCS3820Practical Applications in Occupational Science 3
 Credits15
Summer
ANAT 4000 Human Gross Anatomy 6
 Credits6
Year Four
Fall
MOT 5020 Professional Development I 1
MOT 5150 Kinesiology 3
MOT 5170 Neuroscience in Occupational Therapy 4
MOT 5300 Fundamentals of OT Practice 3
MOT 5460 Occupational Therapy with Aging Adults 3
OCS 4620 Clinical Conditions and Phenomenology 3
 Credits17
Spring
Bachelor of Occupational Science degree awarded upon completion of this semester  
MOT 5030 Professional Development II 1
MOT 5350 Theoretical Foundations of Occupational Therapy 3
MOT 5400 Occupational Therapy for Adults with Physical Dysfunction 4
MOT 5410 Occupational Therapy in Mental Health 3
MOT 5450 Occupational Performance & Assessment of Children and Youth 3
MOT 5490 Applied Research I 1
MOT 5500 Applied Research II 1
 Credits16
Year Five
Fall
MOT 5040 Professional Development III 1
MOT 5250 Policy & Administration 2
MOT 5260 Problem-Based Learning in Occupational Therapy 2
MOT 5480 Occupational Therapy & Upper Extremity Rehabilitation 2
MOT 5550 Occupational Therapy for Adults with Neurological Dysfunction 3
MOT 5560 Occupational Therapy and Community Practice 3
MOT 5600 Occupational Therapy with Infants and Children 4
MOT 5650 Applied Research III 1
 Credits18
Spring
MOT 5700 Advanced Fieldwork I 6
MOT 5750 Advanced Fieldwork II 3
MOT 5660
Applied Research IV (optional 1-6 credits)  
 Credits9
 Total Credits157

1: Select one of the following: ANTH 1200, ASTD 3200, SOC 1100, ECON XXXX or POLS XXXX

2: Select one of the following: ENGL 2XXX-3XXX or HIST XXXX

3: Select one of the following: CMM 1200, Fine Arts or Foreign Language

Post-Baccalaureate Entry

Plan of Study Grid
Year One
SummerCredits
ANAT 4000 Human Gross Anatomy 6
 Credits6
Fall
MOT 5020 Professional Development I 1
MOT 5150 Kinesiology 3
MOT 5170 Neuroscience in Occupational Therapy 4
MOT 5200 Clinical Conditions & Phenomenology 3
MOT 5300 Fundamentals of OT Practice 3
MOT 5460 Occupational Therapy with Aging Adults 3
 Credits17
Spring
MOT 5030 Professional Development II 1
MOT 5350 Theoretical Foundations of Occupational Therapy 3
MOT 5400 Occupational Therapy for Adults with Physical Dysfunction 4
MOT 5410 Occupational Therapy in Mental Health 3
MOT 5450 Occupational Performance & Assessment of Children and Youth 3
MOT 5490 Applied Research I 1
MOT 5500 Applied Research II 1
IPE 4900 Interprofessional Community Practicum 2
 Credits18
Year Two
Fall
MOT 5040 Professional Development III 1
MOT 5250 Policy & Administration 2
MOT 5260 Problem-Based Learning in Occupational Therapy 2
MOT 5480 Occupational Therapy & Upper Extremity Rehabilitation 2
MOT 5550 Occupational Therapy for Adults with Neurological Dysfunction 3
MOT 5560 Occupational Therapy and Community Practice 3
MOT 5600 Occupational Therapy with Infants and Children 4
MOT 5650 Applied Research III 1
 Credits18
Spring
MOT 5700 Advanced Fieldwork I 6
MOT 5750 Advanced Fieldwork II 3
MOT 5660
Applied Research IV (optional 1-6 credits)  
 Credits9
 Total Credits68

Apply for Admission

Contact Doisy College of Health Sciences:
Julie Miller
Recruitment Specialist
314-977-2570
dchs@health.slu.edu