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SLU COVID-19 Vaccination Information

Saint Louis University requires proof of full COVID-19 vaccinations for all students, staff and faculty who are physically present on our St. Louis campuses. Vaccinations are also required of SLU St. Louis students who will be studying outside the U.S., including on our Madrid campus.

COVID-19 Booster Requirements

All eligible students, faculty and staff must submit documentation that they have received a COVID-19 booster vaccine dose for the spring semester. Those who received an approved vaccine exemption for the fall semester will not be required to apply for a new exemption for the spring semester.

At this time, we are not requiring our eligible community members to receive a second mRNA booster dose. However, we highly encourage everyone to stay up-to-date on vaccination, especially those at high-risk for severe illness or those who live with or provide care to a high-risk individual.  

Visit the Vaccine Portal

Frequently Asked Questions

Proof of COVID-19 Vaccination/Booster

How do I let SLU know I've been vaccinated and/or boosted?

We have re-launched our online portal where students, staff and faculty who are living, studying, working, researching and ministering on our St. Louis campuses can submit proof of vaccination and booster dose, or submit their request for a medical or religious exemption.

Access the Portal

What counts as proof of vaccination and/or boosting?

A digital copy of your completed CDC COVID-19 vaccine card, or of a vaccination card provided by the vaccination site where you obtained a World Health Organization-approved COVID-19 vaccine.

What if I was vaccinated or received my booster dose at the Simon Recreation Center through SLU?

You are still required to upload proof of your vaccination/booster dose into the portal. If you lost your vaccine card, please email pandemic@slu.edu to get a replacement.

What if I am a student or employee who is studying or working fully remote?

If your work or studies never bring you to any of our St. Louis campuses, you are not required to abide by the University’s vaccination requirement. Those who come to campus for periodic work, classes or meetings are required to be vaccinated.

Are contract employees required to get the vaccine and/or booster?

The University’s vaccine requirement also applies to contract employees, including those working for our food partners at Sodexo, our Allied security partners and those involved in technical services and construction.

Sodexo, Allied and all other contract employers will be responsible for managing and enforcing our vaccination requirement for their employees, including the collection of proof and processing exemption requests.

I was recently vaccinated or infected with COVID-19. When am I eligible to receive a booster dose?
SLU policy indicates that individuals are eligible to receive their booster five months after they complete their mRNA vaccine series (e.g., Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech) or two months after they receive a dose of J & J. This is the timeline outlined by the CDC for when someone is eligible to receive their booster dose. Our policy supports the earliest time that someone is eligible to be vaccinated.
SLU policy also follows CDC guidance indicating that individuals may receive their booster as soon as they have recovered from COVID-19 and/or ended isolation. You can read about that here. If you were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, you may need to wait 90 days before receiving your booster. Please talk to your healthcare provider.
University policy only requires you to receive your booster dose when you are eligible to do so. If you are not yet eligible to receive your booster dose according to the criteria above, please email pandemic@slu.edu with details. We will place an extension on your account until you are eligible. As soon as you are eligible, you will need to obtain your booster dose and upload proof to the vaccine portal.

If you are eligible to receive your booster dose according to the above criteria, you are expected to do so by the University deadlines.

Can I get a second booster dose?

The State of Missouri has recently affirmed the CDC’s recommendation and FDA’s authorization to allow certain individuals the ability to receive a second COVID-19 mRNA booster dose. Those who are eligible are those who received their first booster dose at least 4 months ago and: 

  • Are 50 years of age or older
  • Are 12 years of age or older, and are moderately to severely immunocompromised             

 At this time, we are not requiring our eligible community members to receive a second mRNA booster dose. However, we highly encourage everyone to stay up-to-date on vaccination, especially those at high-risk for severe illness or those who live with or provide care to a high-risk individual.  

Our campus vaccination clinics will administer second booster doses to those who qualify. If you want to get your booster vaccine at SLU, you can register for an appointment on campus.

Religious and Medical Exemptions

How do I request an exemption for the booster requirement or vaccine?

If you are a vaccinated student or employee and want to request a medical or religious exemption from the booster dose, or you are a new student this semester and you want to apply for a vaccination exemption, the deadlines are:

  • January 31 for graduate and undergraduate students and all SLUCare staff.
  • February 28 for non-SLUCare faculty and staff.

Again, we will provide a brief grace period for those who may need more time to obtain a letter from their primary health care provider for a medical exemption. There will be no deadline extensions for those seeking religious exemptions.

If you obtained a University-approved vaccine exemption in fall 2021, your exemption applies to the booster dose. You don’t need to seek another exemption.

Access the Portal

If I have received a religious or medical exemption do I have to apply for a new exemption for booster doses?

No. Those who received an approved vaccine exemption for the fall semester will not be required to apply for a new exemption for the spring semester. Those who believe their situation has changed and would like to apply for a booster dose exemption may do so. More details on this will be provided soon.

What will qualify as a medical exemption?

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued guidelines regarding the medical reasons for which one may not be vaccinated (i.e., medical contraindications). The CDC guidance serves as the foundation for our approval of medical exemptions.

If you are seeking a medical exemption from our COVID-19 vaccine requirement you will need to include a signed letter from your primary licensed healthcare provider detailing your need for medical exemption. This is the same approach the Student Health Center takes when a student seeks an exemption from other required vaccinations, such as meningitis.

Supporting documentation for your COVID-19 vaccination exemption submission is to be completed by your personal health care provider with whom you have an existing patient/ physician relationship. Exemptions completed by a physician friend or family member will not be accepted.

The letter from your primary care provider must describe your specific contraindication to the COVID-19 vaccine:

  • Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to component of the COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Immediate (within four hours of exposure) allergic reaction of any severity to a previous dose or known (diagnosed) allergy to a component of the vaccine.
  • Other medical contraindication. Certifications in the “Other” category are subject to medical review, including consultation with your primary health care provider regarding the condition.

All letters and supporting documentation must be uploaded to the online portal. You can access the "SLU Vaccination Tracker" by logging in to MySLU (myslu.slu.edu) and navigating to the "Tools" tab. Please email vaccineexemption@slu.edu with any questions on vaccination exemptions. Decisions and correspondence regarding this process will come from that email account.

What will qualify as a religious exemption?

A sincerely held religious belief is one that is either part of a traditional, organized religion such as Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism or Buddhism, as well as non-theistic moral or ethical beliefs as to what is right and wrong, which are sincerely held with the strength of traditional religious views. Social, political or personal preferences do not qualify as a religious belief.

Those seeking a religious exemption will need to fill out and upload the Religious Exemption Form in the vaccine portal. The form is a Word document that you can use to write as much as you feel is needed to fully explain your sincerely-held religious belief and the basis for your exemption request.

Download the Religious Exemption Form in the Vaccine Portal

If you have received other vaccinations, please explain how or why the COVID-19 vaccine is different under your religious belief than the available vaccines to other diseases that you have received. If you have received prior COVID-19 vaccinations, please explain how or why the COVID-19 booster is different under your religious belief than the J&J, Pfizer or Moderna series with which you had been inoculated previously.

The decision regarding your request will be based solely on your written submission, so it is imperative to state fully all information you wish to be considered as part of your request. There are no appeals from the decision reached.

Please email vaccineexemption@slu.edu with any questions on vaccination exemptions. Decisions and correspondence regarding this process will come from that email account.

What if my reason for not getting the vaccine is because of distant ties to fetal cell lines?

Saint Louis University’s COVID-19 vaccine requirement follows the guidance issued by the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF), published after receiving approval from Pope Francis.

The CDF noted that “... all vaccinations recognized as clinically safe and effective can be used in good conscience with the certain knowledge that the use of such vaccines does not constitute formal cooperation with the abortion from which the cells used in production of the vaccines derive.” Further, the CDF observed that “ … from the ethical point of view, the morality of vaccination depends not only on the duty to protect one's own health, but also on the duty to pursue the common good. In the absence of other means to stop or even prevent the epidemic, the common good may recommend vaccination, especially to protect the weakest and most exposed.”

As of July 2021, of the three vaccines most readily available in the U.S., the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines were not developed using fetal cell lines. The Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccine was created in a more traditional manner. Nonetheless, the CDF guidance holds that should the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine not be available or that one’s personal risk requires a “one and done” vaccine, one should accept a J&J or other similar vaccine in support of the common good.

Please email vaccineexemption@slu.edu with any questions on vaccination exemptions. Decisions and correspondence regarding this process will come from that email account.

What doesn’t qualify for a vaccine exemption?
Neither prior infection nor antibody test results will qualify as a vaccine exemption. Please email vaccineexemption@slu.edu with any questions on vaccination exemptions. Decisions and correspondence regarding this process will come from that email account.
What is a personal preference objector?

The option of selecting a “personal preference objection” in the portal is not an approved exemption option. We offer this designation to individuals who do not have a basis for requesting a religious or medical exemption but are still choosing to remain unvaccinated for other reasons.

Students, staff and faculty who make this self-designation need to know that it communicates their intention not to comply with University policy and their understanding that this will result in their removal from the University for at least the fall semester. It also could result in their ultimate separation from the University.

How long will it take for me to know my exemption has been approved?

Our goal will be to sort the exemptions and sign-off on those that meet our requirements — and those that clearly do not — as quickly as we can. But we don’t know exactly how many exemption requests we will receive, and we will have to spend time assessing those that require consideration and judgment.

Please email vaccineexemption@slu.edu with any questions on vaccination exemptions. Decisions and correspondence regarding this process will come from that email account.

How do I contact someone if I have questions about requesting an exemption?

We have created a new email address, vaccineexemption@slu.edu, to help field questions on vaccination exemptions. Decisions and correspondence regarding this process will come from that email account.

What if I am denied an exemption?

If your request for a religious or medical exemption is denied, you are expected to get vaccinated and boosted, once eligible, in order to live, work or learn on our St. Louis campuses at Saint Louis University. There will be a grace period provided to you to get a COVID-19 vaccine at the time of your exemption decision if it is denied.

Will remote learning or working be an option for me if I am denied an exemption?

No. If your request for a religious or medical exemption is denied, you are expected to get vaccinated in order to live, work or learn on campus at Saint Louis University. There will be a grace period provided to you to get a COVID-19 vaccine at the time of your exemption decision. Remote learning and work will not be an option for those who are denied an exemption.

What if I refuse to comply?

A small number of members of our community have voiced their firm refusal to be vaccinated or boosted should their request for an exemption be denied. In the end, we hope our campus community will see that being fully boosted is the optimal way to suppress disease spread among ourselves and one another — and to abide by the common bond of our Jesuit values.

While we hope for 100% compliance with our vaccination and booster requirements (either by being fully boosted or obtaining a University-approved medical or religious exemption), we are realistic that valued members of our community will likely not comply, and we must accept that unfortunate reality. Accordingly, the University has adopted recommendations of a working group of faculty, students and staff for a series of escalating actions that ultimately provides for separation from the University for anyone choosing not to comply with the University’s vaccination and booster requirements without a University-approved medical or religious exemption.

What if I am already exempt from other vaccines?

While existing medical or religious accommodations for SLU-mandated vaccines are helpful to your request for exemption, you will still need to apply for a separate exemption from our COVID-19 vaccine requirement using the forthcoming portal.

General FAQ

How do the COVID-19 vaccines work?

Per the CDC, COVID-19 vaccines help our bodies develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 without us having to get the illness. They do this by leaving the body with a supply of certain cells that will remember how to fight that virus in the future. None of the COVID-19 vaccines are live-virus vaccines.

You can learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work on the CDC website. You’ll also find information about the three types of vaccines currently approved for use, including how they are administered and their possible side effects.

Can I mix and match vaccines when getting my booster shot?

The CDC has given each of us the agency to decide which type of vaccine — Moderna, Pfizer or J&J — we want for our COVID booster dose. You can get the same type of COVID-19 vaccine you received initially, or you can get a different vaccine type. Please speak with your primary care provider if you are unsure which is best for you.

If I am vaccinated, does that mean I don’t have to wear a face mask anymore or follow other public health safeguards?

In accordance with guidance from the St. Louis city health department, everyone — regardless of vaccination status — must wear a face mask in all campus buildings in St. Louis.

If I am up to date on vaccination and then get exposed to COVID-19, do I still have to quarantine?

Per the latest guidance from the CDC, people who are up to date on vaccination are no longer required to be quarantined if they have had close contact with a COVID-19-positive person. “Up to date on vaccination” means being two weeks past your final dose. If you are up to date on vaccination, you will not need to quarantine after exposure to an infected individual. You must provide evidence of completing your vaccine series. The vaccination site provides you with a Vaccination Record Card at the time of immunization. Take a picture of that card and don’t forget to report your vaccination dates to the University.

If I am up to date on vaccination, would I still have to be tested if I have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19?

Yes. Based on current CDC guidance, even students who are up to date on vaccination would need to be tested if they were identified through the contact tracing process as a close contact of someone who tested positive or part of a cluster. This also applies to students who are up to date on vaccination and who begin exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19, as well as all members of athletics teams that require regular asymptomatic testing per NCAA guidelines.