Sleet to Lead Academic Advising Enhancements in New Role

Denise Sleet, Ph.D., has been appointed as interim assistant provost of academic advising, a newly established position that fulfills a key recommendation from the Operational Excellence initiative team that evaluated SLU’s existing advising structure.

Denise Sleet, Ph.D.
Denise Sleet, Ph.D.

Sleet, currently assistant dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, will soon begin to assemble the team that will refine and implement plans for the new advising model as recommended by the initiative team. She brings to the role more than 30 years of experience in student affairs in higher education, specifically in the areas of academic advising and services.

Joining SLU in 1988, as the director of student support services, Sleet’s office oversaw the administration of TRIO support services and advising students. As assistant director of academic services, she served as an academic advisor and coordinator for SLU101, the University’s orientation and registration program for new students. She also oversaw the Ernest A. Calloway Jr. Scholarship for African American Students.

In 2002, she was promoted to director of academic services, the center academic advising unit for freshmen and transfer students. Sleet entered her current role as assistant dean in 2007 and also oversaw academic advising staff and activities in that capacity.

During her tenure at SLU, Sleet has served on a number of committees including Academic Advising Leadership, the College of Arts and Sciences’ Advising and Faculty Mentoring Committee, and SLU 101 Planning Committee. She has served as moderator for the Black Student Alliance, in roles with the University’s Martin Luther King Jr. Scholars Program, and as a member of the academic integrity subcommittee for NCAA Division I athletic certification.

Her awards include the 2002 “Yes I Can” Role Models for Minority Youth Award from the St. Louis Sentinel, and the SLU Black Student Alliance Outstanding Service Award in 2001.

Sleet received her doctorate in higher education from SLU in 2000 after earning a master’s degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1980 in community development, urban affairs. She has presented on minority student academic access at the American College Personnel Association’s (ACPA), the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) and other programs.

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