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'Too Hot to Sing' Exhibit Showcases SLU Research

02/11/2020Media Inquiries

Jeanette Grider
Senior Media Relations Specialist
jgrider1@slu.edu
314-977-2538

Reserved for members of the media.

Too Hot to Sing, a new exhibit at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art (SLUMA) combines science, sight and sound to explore how global warming affects the abilities of animals to find suitable mates.

A student reads about how climate change impacts treehoppers at a new exhibit at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art.

A student reads about how climate change impacts treehoppers at a new exhibit at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art. Photo by Amelia Flood

Too Hot to Sing grew out of research by Kasey Fowler-Finn, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology in SLU's College of Arts and Sciences, about how global warming directly affects the abilities of animals to find suitable mates.

For the exhibition, Finn collaborated with sound artist Stephen Vitiello, whose recordings show how vibrational signals sound at different temperatures, and with Impact Media Lab, a creative agency for scientists.

Fowler-Finn’s study shows how climate change can impact mating success and, ultimately, survival of species that communicate through vibrations. It is important to note that more than 90 percent of insects use vibrations to communicate within and between species.

Vitiello and Fowler-Finn used a specialized laser recording device to record the sounds of insects as they moved on the stems and leaves of plants. Vitiello then manipulated the sound recordings to make them audible to humans.

This exhibition, a collaboration between a scientist and an artist brings climate change into sharp focus as one of the existential challenges humanity faces.

Learn More About Kasey Fowler-Finn’s Research

Want to Go?

Too Hot to Sing runs through Sunday, April 19.

Plan Your Visit

Key Research Take-Aways