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Funded Projects

Below is a listing of funded Inclusive Practice Grant projects, organized by year. The number of funded projects varies from year to year. 

2020 - 2021: Assessment and rubric development for advanced BME elective courses: combined emphasis on technical-based and professional-based components

Project Title: Assessment and rubric development for advanced BME elective courses: combined emphasis on technical-based and professional-based components

Project Team: Natasha Case, Ph.D., Scott Sell, Ph.D., Silviya Zustiak, Ph.D. all from Biomedical Engineering

Project Description: Undergraduate students majoring in BME are required to take six Advanced BME Elective courses. These elective courses, which build from foundational required courses in the curriculum, are intended to expand students’ technical knowledge, to further develop students’ critical thinking skills, and to provide opportunities for students to practice “professional” skills including teamwork, entrepreneurship and innovation, and written and oral communication. Assessment of “professional skills” has long been recognized by accreditation bodies as a necessary component of higher education (for example see Shuman, Besterfield-Sacre and McGourty. JEE (2005) 94:41). Yet, having meaningful assessments to fully realize the intentions of these advanced BME courses presents a course preparation challenge. These assessments should go beyond more traditional assessments used in lower-level undergraduate courses, such as exams, quizzes, and focused group projects (< 2 – 3 weeks
of effort to complete). Such assessments would also require development of more comprehensive grading rubrics, compared to lower-level courses, that will effectively evaluate both technical and “professional” skills (i.e. problem-solving, team-work, communication, leadership, initiative, work ethic, etc). The purpose of this proposal will be the development of at least one meaningful assessment and associated rubric for one advanced BME course that each faculty member teaches.

2020-2021: Developing Culturally Responsive Syllabi for College for Public Health and Social Justice.  Infusing Diversity, Equity and Inclusion into the undergraduate curriculum. 

Project Title: Developing Culturally Responsive Syllabi for College for Public Health and Social Justice.  Infusing Diversity, Equity and Inclusion into the undergraduate curriculum. 

Project Team: Rhonda BeLue, Ph.D. (team leader), Lauren Arnold, Ph.D., Kenya Brumfield-Young, Ph.D., Clare Vogt, RN, BSN, all from College for Public Health and Social Justice

Description of the Project: We intend to analyze the syllabi of undergraduate programs in the SLU College of Public Health and Social Justice. These programs include Criminology, Social Work, Biostatistics, Health Management, and Public Health. We will assess all course syllabi from each major and analyze them to see if they meet the criteria for “equity-minded practice” outlined in the Syllabus Review Guide put out by the Center for Urban Education of the University of Southern California. We intend to develop specific criteria to identify practices in syllabi composition that promote equity and inclusion. The practices include “Demystifying policies and practices,” welcoming students and creating a culture of caring, “validating students’ abilities to be successful,” “creating a partnership for success,” “representing a wide range of experiences,” and “deconstructing the presentation of white students as the norm.” 

2019-2020: Creating awareness for inclusion in online education at the School for Professional Studies.

Project Title: Creating awareness for inclusion in online education at the School for Professional Studies.

Project Team: Katie Devany, Ph.D. (team leader), Chris Tobnick, Ph.D., Alma Torres Rojo, Ph.D. all from the School for Professional Studies

Description of the Project: Authors Coleman and Berge (2018) had discussed the responsibility of universities to offer through their programs “accessible websites that are compatible with assistive technologies to be open to students of diverse backgrounds beyond race, gender, orientation, religion, and class” (p. 5). Moreover, the “push for life long-learning” has created the need to provide education not only to young students but also to adult learners accommodating to any possible option of accessibility (Coleman & Berge, 2018). The Organizational studies department would like to spearhead an initiative to create awareness of online inclusion by reviewing the current state of inclusion at program, instructor, and administrative level in the School for Professional Studies.
We will research how the current and proposed learning management systems and classroom software can accommodate the different levels and types of inclusion and how we can disseminate an inclusion strategy at School level. We will identify a series of artifacts and specific tools to promote inclusion at these different levels. We will conduct workshops to create awareness of inclusion inviting guest speakers and promoting these artifacts and tools for inclusion. We will conduct pre and post surveys to assess how inclusion awareness has evolved during our proposed timeline.

2018 - 2019: Universal Design in Higer Education

Project Title: Universal Design in Higer Education: From Principles to Practice (2nd ed.)

Project Team: Maureen Wikete Lee, Ph.D. (team leader), Karen Myers, Ph.D., and Robert Cole, Ph.D., all from the School of Education

Description of the Project: The faculty of the School of Education’s Undergraduate Teacher Education Program began a curricular reinvention during the 2017-2018 academic year. As of April 2018, program outcomes have been developed for the new curriculum. This project supports continuing work by placing the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Framework at the forefront of the curricular redesign process. As the faculty move to the next stages in curricular development, the Reinert Center’s question, “How can we create more inclusive learning experiences for our students?” provides an essential guide for the curricular work. The Project Team will guide this framing through a book study in which faculty and adjunct instructors in the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program read Universal Design for Learning in Higher Education: From Principles to Practice (2nd ed.) (Burgstahler, Ed., 2015) and the Reinert Center’s Inclusive Teaching Practices web resources, and attend book study lunch gatherings to discuss and reflect on how this information connects to their continued engagement in curricular redesign.

The project is expected to result in multiple artifacts that can be shared with the broader SLU community in order to advance inclusive teaching across the University.